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I am using spring cache abstraction to cache objects in the service layer. This is fine for simple get/put operations, as follows:

static private final String cacheName = "messages";

@CacheEvict(value=cacheName, key="#message.id")
public void deleteMessage(Message message) {
...
}

@Cacheable(value=cacheName, key="#id")
public Message findMessage(Long id) {
...
}

@CachePut(value=cacheName, key="#message.id")
public void saveMessage(Message message) {
...
}

@CachePut(value=cacheName, key="#message.id")
public Message updateMessage(Message message) {
...
}

However, what annotation would I use for the following method:

public long countAllMessages() {
...
}

Since all the objects will be in the cache, there should be a way to get the answer from the cache and not having to go to the repository layer.

Also, the cache is being applied on the following method:

@Cacheable(cacheName)
public List<Message> findAllMessages() {
...
}

I could make the count method call the find all method like this:

public long countAllMessages() {
    return findAllMessages().size();
}

But this would not be efficient in the case where the cache is disabled, as the call would then load all records from the db instead of doing a SELECT COUNT(*)...

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1 Answer 1

The Spring cache abstraction doesn't currently provide a direct way of accessing statistics about the underlying caches. For example, there is no direct way to get the size of all the caches, the keys of the cached objects, etc. It's a higher level abstraction than that. You can, however, get access to the underlying native cache classes via the Cache#getNativeCache() method. Grabbing an instance of Cache from the CacheManager class will give you access to this method. Assuming you know the underlying types of the Cache instances managed by the CacheManager, you can cast them to the appropriate types and gain access to the helper methods on each (assuming there are any).

For example, if your underlying cache store is EHCache, you can grab an instance of the Cache named "messages" by calling CacheManager#getCache("messages"). You'd then be able to check the type and cast the type to net.sf.ehcache.Ehcache, from which you can call the various statistics helper methods (eg. getStatistics()).

Here's an example of going through all the caches managed by CacheManager, checking if they're of type net.sf.ehcache.Ehcache, and subsequently getting their statistics.

public class EhCacheStatistics {
  private CacheManager cacheManager;

  @Inject
  public void setCacheManager(CacheManager cacheManager) {
    this.cacheManager = cacheManager;
  }

  public long getTotalEhCacheSize() {
    long totalSize = 0l;
    for (String cacheName : cacheManager.getCacheNames()) {
      Cache cache = cacheManager.getCache(cacheName);
      Object nativeCache = cache.getNativeCache();
      if (nativeCache instanceof net.sf.ehcache.Ehcache) {
        net.sf.ehcache.Ehcache ehCache = (net.sf.ehcache.Ehcache) nativeCache;
        totalSize += ehCache.getStatistics().getObjectCount();
      }
    }
    return totalSize;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
And how do I ensure that on the first time countAllMessages() is called, it does not hit the cache? –  Solubris Dec 26 '12 at 11:43
    
Instead of calling your version of countAllMessages(), you would call getTotalEhCacheSize() or replace the code from getTotalEhCacheSize() into countAllMessages(). If you need an actual count from the database (or whatever back end), you would need a dedicated method to do that, which you could annotate with the @Cacheable annotation (if you want). If you want it to refresh at any time, evict that methods' cache when you call any other update methods or periodically evict it manually, for example through a background job. –  Jason Day Dec 27 '12 at 5:22

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