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I have this query:

SELECT Param1, Param2 AS P1
FROM SomeTable

And I want to do something like this:

WHERE P1 > 2

There is way to do this? Of course there is a query instead Param2.

share|improve this question
1  
why not use Param2 instead of P1? – patrick choi Dec 26 '12 at 6:16
    
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/3096301/… – NullRef Dec 26 '12 at 6:18
    
PERFORMANCE NOTE: the predicates in a HAVING clause are evaluated only AFTER the rows have been returned, as nearly the last step in the execution plan. An equivalent predicate in the WHERE clause may be able to make use of an index to avoid searching every row for the condition. – spencer7593 Dec 26 '12 at 6:19
WITH ABC
AS
(
SELECT Param1, Param2 AS P1
FROM SomeTable
)
SELECT * from ABC where P1>2
share|improve this answer

you can use having

try this

select param1,param2 as p1
 from table
 having p1 > 2
share|improve this answer
1  
I don't think so. This isn't even valid syntax – Bohemian Dec 26 '12 at 6:16

instead of where use having clause..

    SELECT Param1, Param2 AS P1 
     FROM SomeTable 
     having P1>2;
share|improve this answer
1  
Who up voted this, and WHY? Not valid syntax – Bohemian Dec 26 '12 at 6:18

You can use a subquery:

SELECT Param1, P1
FROM
(
  SELECT Param1, Param2 AS P1
  FROM SomeTable
) src
WHERE P1 > 2
share|improve this answer

Try this,

SELECT Param1, 
[P1] = Param2
FROM SomeTable
WHERE [P1] > 2

If you're using ms sql this should work

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HAVING wouldn't work. Common table as mentioned above is a good way to do it.

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