Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This is the content of my script

#!/bin/bash
# test.sh
# Note: Set permissions on this script to 555 or 755,
# then call it with ./test.sh or sh ./test.sh.
echo
echo "This line appears ONCE in the script, yet it keeps echoing."
echo "The PID of this instance of the script is still $$."
# Demonstrates that a subshell is not forked off.
echo "==================== Hit Ctl-C to exit ===================="
sleep 1
exec $0 # Spawns another instance of this same script
#+ that replaces the previous one.
echo "This line will never echo!" # Why not?
exit 99 # Will not exit here!
# Exit code will not be 99!

And this is the output when I run the script using /bin/bash

[user@localhost ~]$ /bin/bash test.sh 

This line appears ONCE in the script, yet it keeps echoing.
The PID of this instance of the script is still 4872.
==================== Hit Ctl-C to exit ====================
test.sh: line 11: exec: test.sh: not found

This is the output when I run the script using /bin/sh

[user@localhost ~]$ /bin/sh ./test.sh 

This line appears ONCE in the script, yet it keeps echoing.
The PID of this instance of the script is still 4934.
==================== Hit Ctl-C to exit ====================

This line appears ONCE in the script, yet it keeps echoing.
The PID of this instance of the script is still 4934.

==================== Hit Ctl-C to exit ====================

I had to use Ctl-C to stop this.

Why does the same script behave differently based on different mode of execution. FYI: I had to use Ctl-C which I executed the script like this: ./test.sh

share|improve this question
1  
For actual differences between Bourne and Bash, there's a whole section in the Bash manual about this topic. This is not one of them, though. Your script is valid in both; for consistency, you may want to change the shebang line to #!/bin/sh (or edit comments etc to point to /bin/bash instead). – tripleee Dec 26 '12 at 8:14

The first time you run this script using /bin/bash test.sh. The second time, you run it with /bin/sh ./test.sh. Note the difference: test.sh vs ./test.sh.

For whatever reason, the script is unable to spawn a second process running the script, because it's unable to find test.sh. (I'm not sure why this is. I'd guess a PATH issue, perhaps?) See the below error message:

[user@localhost ~]$ /bin/bash test.sh 

This line appears ONCE in the script, yet it keeps echoing.
The PID of this instance of the script is still 4872.
==================== Hit Ctl-C to exit ====================
test.sh: line 11: exec: test.sh: not found

The script can't execute test.sh because it doesn't know where test.sh is; ./test.sh is a full path to the script, which is findable.

The second time you run it, the child processes spawn happily, because ./test.sh is found.

Try running: /bin/bash ./test.sh and /bin/sh ./test.sh and see if there's any difference in the output (shouldn't be).

share|improve this answer

You get the error test.sh: not found because you don't have the current directory in your PATH.

When you run it with ./test.sh, the pathname is relative and PATH is not consulted, so the command is found.

Note that /bin/bash ./test.sh would iterate, and /bin/sh test.sh would fail; it is not an issue of the difference between /bin/bash and /bin/sh.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.