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I want to perform some long running operation (e.g. listening to some event raised by OS) on the background thread. Most of the times, operation will run continuously without any problem. But in certain rare conditions, OS level API sends some error code and I need to raise exception from background thread which has to be propagated to the main thread to show it to the user of my WinFrom application.

I had decided to use BackgroundWorker for this. But .NET 4.0 provides Task class of the Task Parallel Library which is a better option as per various blogs on the TPL.

In my application, I have to kick off the background task before actual form is shown. Since actual code is quite complex, I have written some sample code simulating real time problem:

public static Task task;

        /// <summary>
        /// The main entry point for the application.
        /// </summary>
        [STAThread]
        static void Main()
        {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            ThreadTest tt = new ThreadTest();
            task = new Task(() => tt.PerformTask("hi"));
            task.Start();
            try
            {
                task.Wait();
            }
            catch (AggregateException aggregateException)
            {
                // Handle exception here.
            }

            Application.Run(new Form1());
        }

In this code, I never see the main form simply because background task keeps running without exception and task.Wait() call makes the current thread waiting until background task finishes!

Can I use TPL's Task for such scenarios where main thread should not wait until background task is finished but at the same time, it should get exception details whenever exception is raised from the background task?

In above code, one of the solutions could be to move the task creation code at some later stage. But my question is more academic in this case.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes you can. Please see the code below.

  1. The program code is:

         /// <summary>
    /// The main entry point for the application.
    /// </summary>
    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        Application.EnableVisualStyles();
        Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
    
        CancellationTokenSource  cancellationTokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
    
        Task  longRunningTask = new Task((state) =>
            {
                LongRunningWork.DoWork(  cancellationTokenSource.Token);
    
            },cancellationTokenSource.Token,TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
    
        var newForm = new Form1(cancellationTokenSource); 
        new Thread((state) =>
            {
                longRunningTask.Start();
    
                try
                {
                    longRunningTask.Wait();
                }
                catch (AggregateException exception)
                {
                    Action<Exception> showError = (ex) => MessageBox.Show(state as Form, ex.Message);
    
                    var mainForm = state as Form;
                    if (mainForm != null)
                    {
                        mainForm.BeginInvoke(showError, exception.InnerException);
                    }
    
                }
            }).Start(newForm);
        Application.Run(newForm);
    
  2. And the code for the long running task is:

    public class LongRunningWork
    {
        public static void DoWork( CancellationToken cancellationToken)
        {
    
            int iterationCount = 0;
            //While the 
            while (!cancellationToken.IsCancellationRequested &&iterationCount <5)
            {
                //Mimic that we do some long jobs here
                Thread.Sleep(1000);
    
                iterationCount++;
                //The jobs may throw the exception on the specific condition
                if (iterationCount ==5)
                {
                    throw  new InvalidOperationException("Invalid action");
                }
    
    
            }
    
            //cancel the task 
            cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
        }
    }
    
  3. Finally, the code for the Form1 which includes a exit button, whose function is to terminate the program on clicking.

    public partial class Form1 : Form {

        private CancellationTokenSource _cancellationTokenSource;
    
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }
    
        public Form1(CancellationTokenSource cancellationTokenSource):this()
        {
            _cancellationTokenSource = cancellationTokenSource;
        }
    
        private void exitBtn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //Cancel out the task
            if (_cancellationTokenSource != null)
            {
                _cancellationTokenSource.Cancel();
            }
    
            //Exit the program
            Application.Exit();
    
        }
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
This is really very helpful. Thanks for this. However, in your code too, exception is not propagated to the "main" thread. It's propagated to the thread which started the Task. This would create a problem if we need to show modal MessageBox for which main form has to be passed as a owner of the modal MessageBox. Isn't it? –  CSharpLearner Dec 27 '12 at 8:45
    
See my edited version for the program code –  Toan Nguyen Dec 27 '12 at 10:19
    
Awesome! Worked for me. :) –  CSharpLearner Dec 27 '12 at 10:54
    
You're welcome! –  Toan Nguyen Dec 27 '12 at 11:06

Start your long running operation from the form itself rather than before the form is created. Remember that Application.Run() starts a message loop on the current thread, but that means you can use that message loop to poll your task from the Timer class.

class Form1 : Form
{
    private Timer PollingTimer;
    private Task BackgroundTask;

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        // Begin the background task.
        ThreadTest tt = new ThreadTest();
        this.BackgroundTask = new Task(() => tt.PerformTask("hi"));
        this.BackgroundTask.Start();

        // Monitor the task's status by polling it regularly.
        this.PollingTimer = new Timer();
        this.PollingTimer.Interval = 1000;        // In milliseconds.
        this.PollingTimer.Tick += timerCallback;
        this.PollingTimer.Start();
    }        

    private timerCallback(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (this.BackgroundTask.IsFaulted)
        {
            // Exception information is in BackgroundTask.Exception.
        }
    }
}

If you dislike polling (which I do), you'll need to catch the exception from your task and marshall it back to your UI thread. The best way to do that is simply not catch the exception in the task itself and provide a continuation method which will only execute on error.

class Form1 : Form
{
    private Task BackgroundTask;

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        // Capture the UI thread context.
        // (Note, it may be safer to run this in the Form.Load event than the constructor.
        var uiContext = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();

        // Begin the background task.
        ThreadTest tt = new ThreadTest();
        this.BackgroundTask = new Task(() => tt.PerformTask("hi"))
            // Schedule a continuation to be executed after the task is completed.
            .ContinueWith((t,arg) => 
            {
                // Exception information is in t.Exception
            },null, null, 
            // Only execute the continuation if the task throws an exception.
            TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted,
            // Execute the continuation on the UI thread we captured above. 
            uiContext);
        this.BackgroundTask.Start();
    }        
}

MSDN references for Task.ContinueWith() and TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext().

And, if you have the luxury of .NET 4.5 with async and await:

class Form1 : Form
{
    private Task BackgroundTask;

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }        

    private async void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        ThreadTest tt = new ThreadTest();
        try
        {
            // Move your Task creation and start logic into a method.
            await tt.RunAsync();
        } 
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // Really smart compiler writers make sure you're on the right thread 
            // and everything Just Works(tm).
        }
    }
}
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