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Looking through the answers and comments on CUDA questions, and in the CUDA tag wiki, I see it is often suggested that the return status of every API call should checked for errors. The API documentation contains functions like cudaGetLastError, cudaPeekAtLastError, and cudaGetErrorString, but what is the best way to put these together to reliably catch and report errors without requiring lots of extra code?

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3  
NVIDIA's CUDA samples contains a header, helper_cuda.h, that has macros called getLastCudaError and checkCudaErrors, which do pretty much what is described in the accepted answer. See the samples for demonstrations. Just choose to install the samples along with the toolkit and you will have it. –  chappjc Sep 3 '14 at 1:16
    
@chappjc I do not think this question and answer pretends to be original, if this is what you mean, but it has the merit to have educated people using CUDA error checking. –  JackOLantern Feb 18 at 17:51
    
@JackOLantern No, that's not what I was implying. This Q&A was very helpful to me and it's certainly easier to find than some header in the SDK. I thought it was valuable to point out this is also how NVIDIA handles it and where to look for more. I'd soften the tone of my comment if I could though. :) –  chappjc Feb 18 at 18:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 152 down vote accepted

Probably the best way to check for errors in runtime API code is to define an assert style handler function and wrapper macro like this:

#define gpuErrchk(ans) { gpuAssert((ans), __FILE__, __LINE__); }
inline void gpuAssert(cudaError_t code, const char *file, int line, bool abort=true)
{
   if (code != cudaSuccess) 
   {
      fprintf(stderr,"GPUassert: %s %s %d\n", cudaGetErrorString(code), file, line);
      if (abort) exit(code);
   }
}

You can then wrap each API call with the gpuErrchk macro, which will process the return status of the API call it wraps, for example:

gpuErrchk( cudaMalloc(&a_d, size*sizeof(int)) );

If there is an error in a call, a textual message describing the error and the file and line in your code where the error occurred will be emitted to stderr and the application will exit. You could conceivably modify gpuAssert to raise an exception rather than call exit() in a more sophisticated application if it were required.

A second related question is how to check for errors in kernel launches, which can't be directly wrapped in a macro call like standard runtime API calls. For kernels, something like this:

kernel<<<1,1>>>(a);
gpuErrchk( cudaPeekAtLastError() );
gpuErrchk( cudaDeviceSynchronize() );

will firstly check for invalid launch argument, then force the host to wait until the kernel stops and checks for an execution error. The synchronisation can be eliminated if you have a subsequent blocking API call like this:

kernel<<<1,1>>>(a_d);
gpuErrchk( cudaPeekAtLastError() );
gpuErrchk( cudaMemcpy(a_h, a_d, size * sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost) );

in which case the cudaMemcpy call can return either errors which occurred during the kernel execution or those from the memory copy itself. This can be confusing for the beginner, and I would recommend using explicit synchronisation after a kernel launch during debugging to make it easier to understand where problems might be arising.

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18  
Thanks, this is very useful. If anyone is reading this question, and answer, please upvote both question and answer to make it very visible to search and FAQ. –  Robert Crovella Dec 26 '12 at 13:55
1  
Shouldn't this question be made "community wiki"? –  harrism Feb 6 '14 at 5:01
2  
@harrism: I don't think so. Community Wiki is intended for questions or answers which are frequently edited. This isn't one of those –  talonmies Feb 6 '14 at 5:19
    
shouldn't we add cudaDeviceReset() before exiting also? And a clause for memory deallocation? –  FormlessCloud Oct 21 '14 at 14:14

talonmies' answer above is a fine way to abort an application in an assert-style manner.

Occasionally we may wish to report and recover from an error condition in a C++ context as part of a larger application.

Here's a reasonably terse way to do that by throwing a C++ exception derived from std::runtime_error using thrust::system_error:

#include <thrust/system_error.h>
#include <thrust/system/cuda_error.h>
#include <sstream>

void throw_on_cuda_error(cudaError_t code, const char *file, int line)
{
  if(code != cudaSuccess)
  {
    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << file << "(" << line << ")";
    std::string file_and_line;
    ss >> file_and_line;
    throw thrust::system_error(code, thrust::cuda_category(), file_and_line);
  }
}

This will incorporate the filename, line number, and an English language description of the cudaError_t into the thrown exception's .what() member:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  try
  {
    // do something crazy
    throw_on_cuda_error(cudaSetDevice(-1), __FILE__, __LINE__);
  }
  catch(thrust::system_error &e)
  {
    std::cerr << "CUDA error after cudaSetDevice: " << e.what() << std::endl;

    // oops, recover
    cudaSetDevice(0);
  }

  return 0;
}

The output:

$ nvcc exception.cu -run
CUDA error after cudaSetDevice: exception.cu(23): invalid device ordinal

A client of some_function can distinguish CUDA errors from other kinds of errors if desired:

try
{
  // call some_function which may throw something
  some_function();
}
catch(thrust::system_error &e)
{
  std::cerr << "CUDA error during some_function: " << e.what() << std::endl;
}
catch(std::bad_alloc &e)
{
  std::cerr << "Bad memory allocation during some_function: " << e.what() << std::endl;
}
catch(std::runtime_error &e)
{
  std::cerr << "Runtime error during some_function: " << e.what() << std::endl;
}
catch(...)
{
  std::cerr << "Some other kind of error during some_function" << std::endl;

  // no idea what to do, so just rethrow the exception
  throw;
}

Because thrust::system_error is a std::runtime_error, we can alternatively handle it in the same manner of a broad class of errors if we don't require the precision of the previous example:

try
{
  // call some_function which may throw something
  some_function();
}
catch(std::runtime_error &e)
{
  std::cerr << "Runtime error during some_function: " << e.what() << std::endl;
}
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For those of you who can't/won't use exceptions, here's a suggestion which allows you to make calls as follows:

CUDA_CALL(cudaSomeFunction, param1, param2, param3);

On failure, the error messages mention the name of the API call you used; also, it will be nice and verbose.

Here's the code:

#define CUDA_CALL(cuda_function, ...)  { \
    cudaError_t status = cuda_function(__VA_ARGS__); \
    cudaEnsureSuccess(status, #cuda_function, __FILE__, __LINE__); \
}

bool cudaEnsureSuccess(cudaError_t status, const char* status_context_description,
        bool die_on_error, bool debug_prints, const char* filename, unsigned line_number) {
    if (status_context_description == NULL)
        status_context_description = "";
    if (status == cudaSuccess) {
#if REPORT_CUDA_SUCCESS
         cerr <<  "Succeeded: " << status_context_description << std::endl << std::flush;
#endif
        return true;
    }
    const char* errorString = cudaGetErrorString(status);
    cerr << "CUDA Error: ";
    if (status_context_description != NULL) {
        cerr << status_context_description << ": ";
    }
    if (errorString != NULL) {
        cerr << errorString;
    }
    else {
        cerr << "(Unknown CUDA status code " << status << ")";
    }
    if ((filename != NULL) && (line_number != NULL)) {

        cerr << filename << ":" << line_number;
    }

    cerr << std::endl << std::flush;
    if(die_on_error) {
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
            // ... or cerr << "FATAL ERROR" << etc. etc.
    }
    return false;
}

Notes:

  • The macro is necessary for getting __FILE__ and __LINE__; we could limit it to just this functionality, as in @talmonies ' answer.
  • This function can also be used with a kernel execution wrapper macro which ensures success.
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