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to Perl Masters in the world!

I have a file like this to parse and want to make......

starting from the first column, ID, exon information, start position, end position and direction. ID increases by 1 when it meets a number.

1   9239    712 8571    +
1   start_codon 712 714 +
1   stop_codon  8569    8571    +
2   3882    24137   24264   +
2   start_codon 24137   24139   +
3   3882    24322   24391   +
4   3882    24490   26064   +
4   stop_codon  26062   26064   +
5   4972    26704   26740   +
5   start_codon 26704   26706   +
6   4972    26814   27170   +
7   4972    27257   27978   +
7   stop_codon  27976   27978   +
8   10048   40161   41114   -
8   start_codon 41112   41114   -
8   stop_codon  40161   40163   -
9   272 43167   43629   -
9   stop_codon  43167   43169   -
10  272 43755   44059   -
10  start_codon 44057   44059   -

like this ....

1   9239    *712*   *8571*  +
1   start_codon 712 714 +
1   stop_codon  8569    8571    +
*X  9239    712 8571    +*
2   3882    *24137* 24264   +
2   start_codon 24137   24139   +
3   3882    24322   24391   +
4   3882    24490   *26064* +
4   stop_codon  26062   26064   +
*X  3882    24173   26064   +*
5   4972    *26704* 26740   +
5   start_codon 26704   26706   +
6   4972    26814   27170   +
7   4972    27257   *27978* +
7   stop_codon  27976   27978   +
*X  4972    26704   27978 +*
8   10048   *40161* *41114* -
8   start_codon 41112   41114   -
8   stop_codon  40161   40163   -
*X  10048   40161   41114   -*
9   272 *43167* 43629   -
9   stop_codon  43167   43169   -
10  272 43755   *44059* -
10  start_codon 44057   44059   -
*X  272 43167   44059   -*

each line begins with X has to be added but with my skill I cannot... :(

The thing is for every exon number in the second column ignoring the "start_codon" and "end_codon", have to get the minimum numbered exon position and maximum numbered exon position between asterisks *.

This is my basic code to parse the data... but I guess, have to re-code from the scratch (I do not have any idea how to insert the line 'X')

(Sorry I deleted the code as its not so good enough and may give a confusion...)

Perl Masters in the World, Could you please help me???

Thank you!!

AS TLP aked I put my code back. Its embarrassing code though

use strict;

if (@ARGV != 1) {
    print "Invalid arguments\n";
    print "Usage: perl min_max.pl [exon_output_file]\n";
    exit(0);
}

my $FILENAME = $ARGV[0];
    my  $exonid = 0;
    my  $exon = "";
    my  $startpos = 0;
    my  $endpos = 0;
    my  $strand = "";
    my  $min_pos = 0;
    my  $max_pos = 0;

open (DATA, $FILENAME);

while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    chomp $line;

    if ($line ne "") {
        if ($line =~ /^(.+)\t(.+)\t(.+)\t(.+)\t(.+)/) {
        $exonid = $1;
        $exon = $2;
        $startpos = $3;
        $endpos = $4;
        $strand = $5;
        }
        if ($exon =~ /\d+/) {
            print $exonid,"\t",$exon,"\t",$startpos,"\t",$endpos,"\t",$strand,"\n";
        } else {
            print $exonid,"\t",$exon,"\t",$startpos,"\t",$endpos,"\t",$strand,"\n";
        }
    }
}

close (DATA);
exit;

How can I compare the biggest value and the lowest value....

share|improve this question
    
You have made no attempts to store the min/max values anywhere. How could that possibly work? –  TLP Dec 26 '12 at 10:44
    
exactly, I was trying but I couldn't so I just put the most basic code to begin with I deleted all the parts that weren't working. I am still working on. Thats why the above code is so simple. thanx. :( –  Karyo Dec 26 '12 at 10:47
    
why *X 10048 40161 41114 -* not *X 10048 41112 41114 -* after 8 ? –  eicto Dec 26 '12 at 10:48
    
ignoring the start_codon and the end_codon, Im looking for the smallest value and the biggest value for each numbered exoninformation. Thanx (Numbers in the second column are the exoninfo. ) –  Karyo Dec 26 '12 at 10:51
    
What did you want X to be? –  TLP Dec 26 '12 at 11:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Basically what you do is go through the lines, skip the ones you don't want (i.e. no number in col 2), remember min/max for each new line in the same set, and when the col 2 number changes you print and start over. With this solution, you also have to print the last set manually at the end.

This code uses the internal DATA file handle for demonstration data. Simply change <DATA> to <> to use on a target input file like so: perl script.pl inputfile

use strict;
use warnings;
use List::Util qw(min max);

my $print;
my ($min, $max, $id);
while (<DATA>) {                   ###### change to <> to run on input file
    my @line = split;
    if ($line[1] !~ /^\d+$/) {                # if non-numbers in col 2
         print;                               # print line
         next;                                # skip to next line
    }
    if (!defined($id) or $id != $line[1]) {   # New dataset!
        say $print if $print;                 # Print and reset 
        $id = $line[1];
        $min = $max = undef;
    }
    $min = min($min // (), @line[2,3]);       # find min/max, skip undef
    $max = max($max // (), @line[2,3]);
    $print = join "\t", "X", $line[1], $min, $max;  # buffer the print
}
print $print;

__DATA__
1   9239    712 8571    +
1   start_codon 712 714 +
1   stop_codon  8569    8571    +
2   3882    24137   24264   +
2   start_codon 24137   24139   +
3   3882    24322   24391   +
4   3882    24490   26064   +
4   stop_codon  26062   26064   +
5   4972    26704   26740   +
5   start_codon 26704   26706   +
6   4972    26814   27170   +
7   4972    27257   27978   +
7   stop_codon  27976   27978   +
8   10048   40161   41114   -
8   start_codon 41112   41114   -
8   stop_codon  40161   40163   -
9   272 43167   43629   -
9   stop_codon  43167   43169   -
10  272 43755   44059   -
10  start_codon 44057   44059   -

Output:

9239    712     8571
3882    24137   26064
4972    26704   27978
10048   40161   41114
272     43167   44059
share|improve this answer
    
Thanx TLP for the help, but the output that I wanted was like the second box in my question. But reading thorugh you code will help me learning perl more. So I am glad and appreciate your help and time. –  Karyo Dec 26 '12 at 13:19
    
@Karyo That's just a matter of adding a print statement before the next statement, and then reformatting the $print variable. Unless you also wanted the * symbols around the min/max numbers. –  TLP Dec 26 '12 at 14:23
    
Thanks TLP, your one works more generally!!!! but what do you mean by adding a print statement before the next statement? Sorry I don't get it :( –  Karyo Dec 27 '12 at 1:48
    
It's not rocket science. I mean adding the word print before the word next. :) I've made some small changes, you can study the version history of my post to see exactly what I did. Click the part where it says edited X hours/minutes ago. –  TLP Dec 27 '12 at 11:39

If I understand you right, here's one way (untested!) to do what you seem to be asking for:

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'say';

# read first line, initialize accumulators, print it back
chomp($_ = <>);
my ($last_id, $last_exon, $min_start, $max_end, $last_strand) = split /\t/;
say $_;

# loop over remaining lines
while (<>) {
    chomp;
    my ($exonid, $exon, $startpos, $endpos, $strand) = split /\t/;

    if ($exon !~ /\D/ and $exon != $last_exon) {
        # new exon found, print summary of last one...
        say join "\t", "X", $last_exon, $min_start, $max_end, $last_strand;
        # ...and reset accumulators
        ($last_id, $last_exon, $min_start, $max_end, $last_strand)
            = ($exonid, $exon, $startpos, $endpos, $strand);
    }
    else {
        # previous exon continues, just update accumulators
        $last_id     = $exonid;
        $last_exon   = $exon     if $exon !~ /\D/;
        $min_start   = $startpos if $min_start > $startpos;
        $max_end     = $endpos   if $max_end < $endpos;
        $last_strand = $strand;  # should not really be needed
    }
    # ...and don't forget to print the original line back again
    say $_;
}
# end of file, print summary of last exon
print join("\t", "X", $last_exon, $min_start, $max_end, $last_strand), "\n";

Basically, I'm assuming that you want to print a summary line starting with X whenever you encounter a number in the second column which is different from the previous number in that column, and that lines with non-numeric values in the second column should never trigger a summary. Also, you'll presumably want a summary line at the end of the file, too.

The expression $exon !~ /\D/ returns true if $exon contains only numbers. (Specifically, it tests whether it doesn't contain a non-numeric character, so an empty string would match too.)

There are a bunch of edge cases that I haven't considered, since I don't know whether they're possible in your data and how you want to treat them if they do occur. For example, just to be careful, one might wish to also print a summary in the unlikely event that the strand changes while the exon number stays the same. Similarly, a careful programmer might want to consider the possibility of the input file being empty, or of the first line containing a non-numeric value in the second column.

At least with use warnings you'll be alerted if any of the values I assumed would always be numeric turn out not to be so.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanx llmari Karonen! This code is working great, but it doesn't print out the first line of the file "1 9239 712 8571 +" and starting with the second line. But thanx heaps I will manage to do the rest! –  Karyo Dec 26 '12 at 13:10
    
Ah, silly me. Fixed. –  Ilmari Karonen Dec 26 '12 at 13:24
    
I've tried, but this time the first line printed twice. So Once I removed the 'say $_;' from the first chomp line, it worked perfect! Thanx heaps! –  Karyo Dec 26 '12 at 13:39
    
Oh no my bad! Ur edited one just worked perfect! –  Karyo Dec 26 '12 at 13:52

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