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I'm deriving a class from a parameterless-constructor class like this:

public class Base
{
    public Base(Panel panel1)
    {

    }
}

public class Derived : Base
{
    public Derived() : base(new Panel())
    {
        //How do I use panel1 here?
    }
}

How can I refer to panel1 in Derived?

(Simple workarounds welcome.)

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Adil's answer assumes that you can modify Base. If you can't, you can do this:

public class Derived : Base
{
    private Panel _panel;

    public Derived() : this(new Panel()) {}

    private Derived(Panel panel1) : base(panel1)
    {
        _panel = panel1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Good catch. I actually can't modify Base! – ispiro Dec 26 '12 at 11:00
    
@ispiro note that the private _panel field is actually a little bit dangerous. If you had some other use for the panel in mind when you wrote "how can I use panel1 here", you should just do that, and remove the private field (and, of course, the assignment). And thanks for cleaning up the code formatting! – phoog Dec 26 '12 at 21:57
    
That's exactly what I did (-not having the private field). But what do you mean "dangerous"? – ispiro Dec 26 '12 at 22:54
    
@ispiro if you have a private reference to an object, and the base class has its own private reference to the object, it's not necessarily guaranteed that they will always point to the same object. In other words, the base class might, as an implementation detail, create a new object and start using that, while the derived class's private field is still pointing to the original object. It seems unlikely in this case, but it's possible in general. – phoog Dec 26 '12 at 23:14
    
Thanks. And thanks again for the answer. – ispiro Dec 27 '12 at 0:13

You need to define Panel in Base, you can use protected instead of public as well. Read more aboud access speicifiers here

public class Base
{
    public Panel panel {get; set;};
    public Base(Panel panel1)
    {
         panel = panel1;
    }
}


public class Derived : Base
{
    public Derived() : base(new Panel())
    {
          //  this.panel
    }
}
share|improve this answer
public class Base
{
    // Protected to ensure that only the derived class can access the _panel attribute
    protected Panel _panel;
    public Base(Panel panel1)
    {
        _panel = panel1;
    }
}

public class Derived : Base
{
    public Derived() : base(new Panel())
    {
        // refer this way: base.panel
    }
}


Further if you want to provide only a get and not a set for the derived classes you can do this:

 public class Base
    {
        // Protected to ensure that only the derived class can access the _panel attribute
        private Panel _panel;
        public Base(Panel panel1)
        {
            _panel = panel1;
        }

        protected Panel Panel
        {  get { return _panel; } } 
    }

    public class Derived : Base
    {
        public Derived() : base(new Panel())
        {
            // refer this way: base.Panel (can only get)
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Two ways:

public class Derived : Base
{
    Panel aPanel;

    public Derived() : this(new Panel()) {}

    public Derived(Panel panel) : base(aPanel)
    {
        //Use aPanel Here.
    }
}

OR

public class Base
{
    protected Panel aPanel;

    public Base(Panel panel1)
    {
        aPanel = panel1
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The first doesn't work. – ispiro Dec 26 '12 at 10:58

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