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I'm playing with the new lambda features in Java 8, and found that the practices offered by Java 8 are really useful. However, I'm wondering is there a good way to make a work-around for the following scenario. Suppose you have an object pool wrapper that requires some kind of a factory to fill the object pool, for example (using java.lang.functions.Factory):

public class JdbcConnectionPool extends ObjectPool<Connection> {

    public ConnectionPool(int maxConnections, String url) {
        super(new Factory<Connection>() {
            @Override
            public Connection make() {
                try {
                    return DriverManager.getConnection(url);
                } catch ( SQLException ex ) {
                    throw new RuntimeException(ex);
                }
            }
        }, maxConnections);
    }

}

After transforming the functional interface into lambda expression, the code above becomes like that:

public class JdbcConnectionPool extends ObjectPool<Connection> {

    public ConnectionPool(int maxConnections, String url) {
        super(() -> {
            try {
                return DriverManager.getConnection(url);
            } catch ( SQLException ex ) {
                throw new RuntimeException(ex);
            }
        }, maxConnections);
    }

}

Not so bad indeed, but the checked exception java.sql.SQLException requires a try/catch block inside the lambda. At my company we use two interfaces for long time:

  • IOut<T> that is an equivalent to java.lang.functions.Factory;
  • and a special interface for the cases that usually require checked exceptions propagation: interface IUnsafeOut<T, E extends Throwable> { T out() throws E; }.

Both IOut<T> and IUnsafeOut<T> are supposed to be removed during migration to Java 8, however there is no exact match for IUnsafeOut<T, E>. If the lambda expressions could deal with checked exceptions like they were unchecked, it could be possible to use simply like the following in the constructor above:

super(() -> DriverManager.getConnection(url), maxConnections);

That looks much cleaner. I see that I can rewrite the ObjectPool super class to accept our IUnsafeOut<T>, but as far as I know, Java 8 is not finished yet, so could be there some changes like:

  • implementing something similar to IUnsafeOut<T, E>? (to be honest, I consider that dirty - the subject must choose what to accept: either Factory or "unsafe factory" that cannot have compatible method signatures)
  • simply ignoring checked exceptions in lambdas, so no need in IUnsafeOut<T, E> surrogates? (why not? e.g. another important change: OpenJDK, that I use, javac now does not require variables and parameters to be declared as final to be captured in an anonymous class [functional interface] or lambda expression)

So the question is generally is: is there a way to bypass checked exceptions in lambdas or is it planned in the future until Java 8 is finally released?


Update 1

Hm-m-m, as far as I understand what we currently have, it seems there is no way at the moment, despite the referenced article is dated from 2010: Brian Goetz explains exception transparency in Java. If nothing changed much in Java 8, this could be considered an answer. Also Brian says that interface ExceptionalCallable<V, E extends Exception> (what I mentioned as IUnsafeOut<T, E extends Throwable> out of our code legacy) is pretty much useless, and I agree with him.

Do I still miss something else?

share|improve this question
    
For anyone following the evolution of the lambdas API, it's worth noting that java.util.functions.Factory::make is now java.util.function.Supplier::get. You can see an up-to-date version of the API docs at lambdadoc.net, a subsite of the [Lambda FAQ] (lambdafaq.org) –  Maurice Naftalin Dec 26 '12 at 14:50
    
@MauriceNaftalin, thanks for the comment. I currently use OpenJDK 1.8.0-EA. –  Lyubomyr Shaydariv Dec 26 '12 at 14:59
1  
one approach is given in this blog –  Matt Dec 26 '12 at 18:22
    
@Matt, thanks for the post link! –  Lyubomyr Shaydariv Dec 26 '12 at 19:50
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4 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Not sure I really answer your question, but couldn't you simply use something like that?

public final class SupplierUtils {
    private SupplierUtils() {
    }

    public static <T> Supplier<T> wrap(Callable<T> callable) {
        return () -> {
            try {
                return callable.call();
            }
            catch (RuntimeException e) {
                throw e;
            }
            catch (Exception e) {
                throw new RuntimeException(e);
            }
        };
    }
}

public class JdbcConnectionPool extends ObjectPool<Connection> {

    public JdbcConnectionPool(int maxConnections, String url) {
        super(SupplierUtils.wrap(() -> DriverManager.getConnection(url)), maxConnections);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks! Yes, your approach seems to be a possible solution in the terms of current Java 8 features (this also was suggested by Matt in a post comment via Guava Throwables java8blog.com/post/37385501926/… ). It also seems to be the most elegant solution, but, I guess you also agree, that's a little boiler-plate. Brian Goetz in 2010 tried something to solve this problem using something like variadic type parameters, and probably Java will get this fixed somehow, who knows. –  Lyubomyr Shaydariv Dec 26 '12 at 20:27
2  
Yet another great example of checked exception abuse. Wrapping the exception in RuntimeException might be necessary in this case, but failing to unwrap it again on the outside defeats the entire point of checked exceptions. Please take the time to read why checked exceptions exist and when they should be used: stackoverflow.com/a/19061110/14731 –  Gili Feb 15 at 21:05
    
@Gili Checked exceptions are an abuse of programmer, not vice versa. They promote boilerplate code, incidental complexity, and downright programming errors. They break program flow, especially because try-catch is a statement and not an expression. Wrapping exceptions is a) a nuisance, b) little more than a hack and work around the basic misdesign. –  Marko Topolnik Mar 21 at 10:18
1  
99% of real-life program logic requires checked and unchecked exceptions alike to break the current unit of work and have them uniformly handled at the top-level exception barrier. Those rare cases where the exception is a part of regular program logic are not something that the programmer will tend to miss, and would need the compiler to tell him. –  Marko Topolnik Mar 21 at 10:19
1  
@MarkoTopolnik, I withdraw my comment about the software crashing in the face of the WIFI connection going down. We could have a very interesting debate on this topic, but Stackoverflow's comment system doesn't work well for this kind of discussion (comments are too short, and too asynchronous). Let's agree to disagree for now ;) –  Gili Mar 23 at 15:58
show 8 more comments

In the lambda mailing list this was throughly discussed. As you can see Brian Goetz suggested there that the alternative is to write your own combinator:

Or you could write your own trivial combinator:

static<T> Block<T> exceptionWrappingBlock(Block<T> b) {
     return e -> {
         try { b.accept(e); }
         catch (Exception e) { throw new RTE(e); }
     };
}

You can write it once, in less that the time it took to write your original e-mail. And similarly once for each kind of SAM you use.

I'd rather we look at this as "glass 99% full" rather than the alternative. Not all problems require new language features as solutions. (Not to mention that new language features always causes new problems.)

In those days the Consumer interface was called Block.

I think this corresponds with JB Nizet's answer.

Later Brian explains why this was designed this way (the reason of problem)

Yes, you'd have to provide your own exceptional SAMs. But then lambda conversion would work fine with them.

The EG discussed additional language and library support for this problem, and in the end felt that this was a bad cost/benefit tradeoff.

Library-based solutions cause a 2x explosion in SAM types (exceptional vs not), which interact badly with existing combinatorial explosions for primitive specialization.

The available language-based solutions were losers from a complexity/value tradeoff. Though there are some alternative solutions we are going to continue to explore -- though clearly not for 8 and probably not for 9 either.

In the meantime, you have the tools to do what you want. I get that you prefer we provide that last mile for you (and, secondarily, your request is really a thinly-veiled request for "why don't you just give up on checked exceptions already"), but I think the current state lets you get your job done.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. Frankly speaking, I hoped that lambda expressions will be checked-exceptions-friendly, and the universe of checked exceptions will pass by lambdas since they are purely a compiler-driven feature. But no luck. –  Lyubomyr Shaydariv Mar 27 at 18:19
    
@LyubomyrShaydariv I think the expert group struggled with several design issues. The need, requirement or constraint to keep backwards compatibility made things difficult, then we have other important issues like the lack of value types, type erasure and checked exceptions. If Java had the first and lacked of the other two the design of JDK 8 would have been very different. So, we all must understand that it was a difficult problem with lots of tradeoffs and the EG had to draw a line somewhere and make a decision. That may not always pleases us, but surely there will be workarounds suggested. –  Edwin Dalorzo Mar 28 at 15:04
    
Yes, but lacking both value types and true generics is caused with JVM legacy, despite the checked exceptions do not exist in runtime, and they are purely compiler-driven. Kotlin or Xtend do not have checked exceptions, so they do not force to catch an IOException, for example. For me, it's still not yet clear why the design team doesn't allow to omit the checked exceptions in lambda expressions. It would be nice to have an example scenario where omitting a checked exception in a lambda expression might break the expectations. –  Lyubomyr Shaydariv Mar 28 at 16:03
    
@LyubomyrShaydariv A functional interface is just like any other interface. You can implement it through a lambda expression or manually. If you would throw a checked exception within the implementation of an interface method that does not declare to throw that exception you are breaking the semantics of the programming language. You are throwing an exception not expected by the code dealing with implementations of the interface. I do not see that is OK. I will need a more elaborate example of your proposition for it to make sense to me. Maybe you should create another discussion for that. –  Edwin Dalorzo Mar 28 at 16:13
1  
Well, so the only thing I currently see, if lambda expressions were checked-exceptions-friendly, is: try { iDontHaveThrowsDeclared(x -> someIOOperation(x)) } catch ( IOException ) { ... } won't compile, because IOException in the catch block is known to be a checked one and the iDontHaveThrowsDeclareddoesn't have a throws clause. So yes, it breaks. –  Lyubomyr Shaydariv Mar 28 at 17:52
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Have you considered using a RuntimeException (unchecked) wrapper class to smuggle the original exception out of the lambda expression, then casting the wrapped exception back to it's original checked exception?

class WrappedSqlException extends RuntimeException {
    static final long serialVersionUID = 20130808044800000L;
    public WrappedSqlException(SQLException cause) { super(cause); }
    public SQLException getSqlException() { return (SQLException) getCause(); }
}

public ConnectionPool(int maxConnections, String url) throws SQLException {
    try {
        super(() -> {
            try {
                return DriverManager.getConnection(url);
            } catch ( SQLException ex ) {
                throw new WrappedSqlException(ex);
            }
        }, maxConnections);
    } catch (WrappedSqlException wse) {
        throw wse.getSqlException();
    }
}

Creating your own unique class should prevent any likelihood of mistaking another unchecked exception for the one you wrapped inside your lambda, even if the exception is serialized somewhere in the pipeline before you catch and re-throw it.

Hmm... The only thing I see that's a problem here is that you are doing this inside a constructor with a call to super() which, by law, must be the first statement in your constructor. Does try count as a previous statement? I have this working (without the constructor) in my own code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for reply. I would really like to prevent explicit try/catching in lambda expressions because try/catch blocks look ugly making the lambdas ugly too. I guess there are at least two reasons of why it cannot work like that so far: 1) the history of Java itself; 2) a method, that's invoked with a lambda expression having methods with throws invocations inside, probably should be "automatically" declared as "throws SomeEx", even if the method is declared without any throws or it declares to throw exception of another type rather than could be propagated from the lambda. –  Lyubomyr Shaydariv Aug 9 '13 at 4:00
    
3) If it could "swallow" checked exceptions, I think, then it might break your expectations for a checked exception or unchecked exception you might expect to catch in any caller outside. For example, you could expect to catch IOException for currently illegal code like list.forEach(p -> outputStream.write(p.hashCode())) (write() throws IOException), but you'd probably couldn't do it, because Iterable.forEach() is not declared as a method throwing IOException, so a compiler cannot know of these intentions. Sometimes checked exceptions are really harmful... –  Lyubomyr Shaydariv Aug 9 '13 at 4:16
    
I agree. It would be overkill to provide a second set of java.util.function classes that declare that they throw a (checked) Exception. Especially since we'd need two versions of every method with a function parameter - one that throws and one that doesn't. That goes a long way toward explaining why Scala doesn't have checked exceptions (only unchecked). Java 8 is a copy of Scala's lambdas with a -> instead of =>. I wonder if Martin Odersky suggested any of this while he was working at Sun? I hope Java 9 includes immutable versions of most of their API classes. –  GlenPeterson Aug 9 '13 at 15:09
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Wrapping the exception in the described way does not work. I tried it and I still get compiler errors, which is actually according to the spec: the lambda expression throws the exception which is incompatible with the target type of the method argument: Callable; call() does not throw it so I can not pass the lambda expression as a Callable.

So basically there is no solution: we are stuck with writing boilerplate. The only thing we can do is voice our opinion that this needs fixing. I think the spec should not just blindly discard a target type based on incompatible thrown exceptions: it should subsequently check whether the thrown incompatible exception is caught or declared as throws in the invoking scope. And for lambda expressions that are not inlined I propose we can mark them as silently throwing checked exception (silent in the sense that the compiler should not check, but the runtime should still catch). let's mark those with => as opposed to -> I know this is not a discussion site, but since this IS the only solution to the question, let yourself be heard and let's change this spec!

share|improve this answer
    
The wrapping is described just like it could imitate a checked-exception-less Supplier<T> instead of Callable<T> -- that is a surrogate way and it works for most cases that I was faced with. I personally would change the behavior of lambda expressions / functional interfaces for checked exceptions. But I have doubt that the lambda-dev team will agree to change that behavior for lambda's. Unfortunately Java checked exceptions are good by intention, but harmful in practice. This is similar to wrapping a checked exception into RuntimeException within try/catch in every method. –  Lyubomyr Shaydariv Jan 15 '13 at 17:35
    
Well, there is a way to kind of genericly wrap the checked exception which is slightly more eloborate then described, see my upcoming answer. But still, I agree with you that our programming lives would be better if the compiler would work a bit harder and allow us to throw checked exceptions in our lambdas. As it stands we are deprived of catching specific checked exceptions that occur there, forcing us into ugly cumbersome coding. yuck! –  Waldo auf der Springe Jan 16 '13 at 22:21
    
By the way, you can try to suggest your idea for simplified checked exceptions handling to lambda-dev team via their mailing list. If they approve your email (not idea itself) -- you might know their pros and cons for changing the spec, and probably personal ideas and thoughts by Brian Goetz too. –  Lyubomyr Shaydariv Jan 17 '13 at 9:45
    
Thank you for the tip. I tried that actually, but the suggestion has completely been ignored. The reactions of contributions made regarding checked exceptions don't look too positive. Nevertheless I hope that people that share these concerns speak out, while there is still some time to repair it. The java lambda looks so good that this deserves fixing. –  Waldo auf der Springe Jan 18 '13 at 20:46
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