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you can get all the details about the problem from this pdf document: www.shaastra.org/2013/media/events/70/Tab/422/Modern_Warfare_ps_v1.pdf

how to recognize a zebra crossing from top view using opencv ?? it is not a straight zebra crossing it has some twists and turns i have some ideas, 1. parallel line detection but the available techniques only works to find straight parallel not the ones that has curve in it. 2. template matching to match a template of back to back white and black stripes but it becomes tedious since i cant find any pattern matching techniques with scaling and rotation.

in fact a idea on any single part of the problem will be so helpful!! it is driving me crazy someone please help!!!! any help is appreciated thanks in advance ....

NOTE: the zebra crossing i am talking about has the inside lines perpendicular to the border lines, just like a normal zebra crossing. only difference is that the path has curves like a river

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I'd put some research into recognizing a zebra from Hough transform. –  Algebra Dec 26 '12 at 13:25
    
cool idea @Algebra but i really don't want to get that deep to detect a zebra ,and also the zebra crossing i am talking about has the inside lines perpendicular to the border lines, just like a normal zebra crossing only difference is that the path has curves like a river ............ any way thank you –  user1929880 Dec 26 '12 at 16:06

2 Answers 2

Here is a relevant paper:

Detecting and Locating Crosswalks using a Camera Phone

While this is not an opencv implementation it should be a reasonable place to start.

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Reading this paper, and another one of their papers that they site it appears that their algorithm is tuned for straight zebra striped cross walks. Still, this may be a good start. –  ditkin Dec 26 '12 at 14:20
    
it seems really helpful and also reminds me that even to solve this problem I still have a lot to learn !! –  user1929880 Dec 26 '12 at 16:54

I'd have a look at Haar-like features as a low level descriptor. It is very commonly used in face detection but is a technique with wide applications.

Some of the very common features are sensitive to lines; vertical, horizontal, or diagonal. These should be well suited to detecting zebra crosswalks. Also, depending on your implementation, these feature sets can be scale insensitive which would make your algorithm more robust.

A large number of parallel lines with such contrast (white (or yellow) paint vs pavement) should get you on your way to recognizing zebra crossings. I'm not sure exactly what you mean by 'twists and turns' as zebra crossings, by design, are supposed to be straight. If you provide an image or two of your edge cases, perhaps we can brainstorm with you.

Edit: I also agree strongly with @Algebra's comment. Using a Hough transform, you could get the edges of the lines. A number of parallel lines at regular intervals should be a strong indication of a zebra crossing.

For whichever approach(es) you explore, you will want to use machine learning techniques for pattern recognition to make the final decision on what a zebra crossing looks like. You do not want to hard code things like 'x parallel lines of y width and z length'.

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you can get all the details about the problem from this pdf document: www.shaastra.org/2013/media/events/70/Tab/422/Modern_Warfare_ps_v1.pdf and the zebra crossing i am talking about has the inside lines perpendicular to the border lines, just like a normal zebra crossing.only difference is that the path has curves like a river thanks for the idea going through that........ –  user1929880 Dec 26 '12 at 16:21
    
and actually the curved zebra crossing will always be in a perfect scale black and white stripes 25 mm each and the path is 250 mm width –  user1929880 Dec 26 '12 at 16:25
    
This is for a robotics competition? With a physical game space, yeah? If so, I'd highly suggest getting images from the perspective of your robot. The competition may provide these, you could build a physical model of the game space yourself, or maybe generate mock images using a 3d modeling tool. The point being, you will the perspective of your robot will change how you design your algorithm. If its a top-down flying robot thats a different problem than a robot that's low to the ground and looking forward. In either case you'll probably be using edge detection, pattern recognition, etc. –  Sean Connolly Dec 26 '12 at 16:40
    
Also, take a look at the Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) and similar feature descriptor algorithms. They might help in recognizing the zebra crossing at different angles. –  Sean Connolly Dec 26 '12 at 16:43
    
yes this is for a robotics competition. surely the perspective of the robot changes a lot but for the due to accuracy , hard deadline and all other stuffs ,which one will be easier to program the on-board camera or the top view camera ?? and also you might have seen that the robot has to process some obstacles along its path –  user1929880 Dec 26 '12 at 17:02

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