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Is there a built-in function for PHP for me to check whether two arrays contain the same values ( order not important?).

For example, I want a function that returns me true for the following two inputs:

array('4','5','2') 
array('2','4','5')

Edit: I could have sorted the two arrays and compare them, but as I am such a lazy guy, I would still prefer a one-liner that I can pull out and use.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 19 down vote accepted

array_diff looks like an option:

function array_equal($a1, $a2) {
  return !array_diff($a1, $a2) && !array_diff($a2, $a1);
}

or as an oneliner in your code:

if(!array_diff($a1, $a2) && !array_diff($a2, $a1)) doSomething();
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3  
You can use empty only with varliables. –  Gumbo Sep 10 '09 at 9:27
    
gumbo: no, you can use it on arrays just fine. taken from <php.net/empty>;: “The following things are considered to be empty: # array() (an empty array)” –  knittl Sep 10 '09 at 9:40
3  
Gumbo is right. You can't use a function's return value with empty. That's what he was actually saying. You have to store the return value of array_diff in a temp variable or just use the not operator: return !array_diff($a1, $a2). –  Ionuț G. Stan Sep 10 '09 at 9:44
1  
@knittl: No, you can only test variables and not values. empty() only checks variables as anything else will result in a parse error. Again, see docs.php.net/empty –  Gumbo Sep 10 '09 at 9:44
    
ionut: ok, that makes more sense. i’ve just tried it, and you’re both correct. i edited my answer to use a boolean cast (negate) –  knittl Sep 10 '09 at 9:47
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The best solution is to sort both array and then compare them:

$a = array('4','5','2');
$b = array('2','4','5');
sort($a);
sort($b);
var_dump($a === $b);

As a function:

function array_equal($a, $b, $strict=false) {
    if (count($a) !== count($b)) {
        return false;
    }
    sort($a);
    sort($b);
    return ($strict && $a === $b) || $a == $b;
}

Here’s another algorithm looking for each element of A if it’s in B:

function array_equal($a, $b, $strict=false) {
    if (count($a) !== count($b)) {
        return false;
    }
    foreach ($a as $val) {
        $key = array_search($val, $b, $strict);
        if ($key === false) {
            return false;
        }
        unset($b[$key]);
    }
    return true;
}

But that has a complexity of O(n^2). So you better use the sorting method.

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as I am such a lazy guy, I would still prefer a one-liner that I can pull out and use. –  Graviton Sep 10 '09 at 8:45
2  
@Ngu Soon Hui - so wrap Gumbo's code into a function (array_equals($arr1,$arr2))? –  karim79 Sep 10 '09 at 8:47
2  
It would be helpful if the down-voter commented on why he voted my answer down. –  Gumbo Sep 10 '09 at 10:10
    
@Gumbo Maybe, because he or she is a sick prick (sorry! :~), and that's why he or she downvoted a perfectly valid and professionally written answer? :] –  trejder Sep 23 '13 at 7:36
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The array_diff() method above won't work.

php.net's manual says that array_diff() does this:

"Returns an array containing all the entries from array1 that are not present in any of the other arrays."

So the actual array_diff() method would be:

function array_equal($array1, $array2)
{
   $diff1 = array_diff($array1, $array2);
   $diff2 = array_diff($array2, $array1);

   return
   (
      (count($diff1) === 0) &&
      (count($diff2) === 0)
   );
}

However I go with the sort method :D

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+1 that's a better way to do it. I found that issue today and ended up using !array_diff($a,$b) && !array_diff($b,$a). Not the best solution, but it does work. –  Weboide Feb 12 '11 at 19:02
    
A side note: Though, this is out of OP's question, it is worth to remember, that using array_diff() (and similar like array_intersect()) will fail on multidimensional arrays (PHP notice: Array to string conversion), while using simple array operators of == and === will work on such arrays without any problems. –  trejder Sep 23 '13 at 8:47
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You can use array_diff.

$a = array('4','5','2');
$b = array('2','4','5');

if(count(array_diff($a, $b)) == 0) {
  // arrays contain the same elements
} else {
  // arrays contain different elements
}

However, a problem with this approach is that arrays can contain duplicate elements, and still match.

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1  
Anyone know the details on performance difference between a diff and a sort in php? –  Kazar Sep 10 '09 at 8:51
2  
if (array_diff($a, $b)) {} would do. empty array evaluate to false. –  SilentGhost Sep 10 '09 at 9:32
    
Using array_diff is easy. But it requires extra space (O(n)) as an additional array is created where those elements of A are stored, that are not also element of B. –  Gumbo Sep 10 '09 at 9:36
1  
@Gumbo: and is there a reason to care? –  SilentGhost Sep 10 '09 at 9:46
    
@SilentGhost: Not if you have infinite time and space. But who has that? –  Gumbo Sep 10 '09 at 9:53
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Its as easy as using == or ===.

($a == $b) TRUE if $a and $b have the same key/value pairs.

($a === $b) TRUE if $a and $b have the same key/value pairs in the same order and of the same types.

http://php.net/manual/en/language.operators.array.php

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That doesn't work for what he's looking for because he only wants to compare the array values, not the keys. In his example the keys are different (because the elements are in a different order), but he wants it to still return true because the values are the same. –  orrd Mar 30 at 5:35
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if (count($a1) == count($a2) && !array_diff($a1, $a2))

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You can use array_intersect() instead of array_diff():

$a = array('4','5','2');
$b = array('2','4','5');
$ca = count($a);
$cb = count($b);
$array_equal = ( $ca == $cb && $ca == count(array_intersect($a, $b)) );

Performance wise. solution, where two factors are important:

  • the more often arrays are matching, the more array_intersect() is fast.
  • the more arrays are big (more than 10 values), the more array_intersect() is fast.

Depending on these factors, one method can be two or three time faster than the other. For big arrays with few (or no) matching combinations, or for little arrays with lots of matching, both methods are equivalent.

However, the sort method is always faster, except in the case with little arrays with few or no matching combinations. In this case the array_diff() method is 30% faster.

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Formatting notice: You used poorly written HTML instead of Markdown (fixed) and you seems to be not liking capital letters in the beginning of each section (fixed). So in general, I should downvote your laziness! :] But, on the other hand, you provided an exceptional and interesting answer, so that's fine! :] –  trejder Sep 23 '13 at 7:40
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