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Phonegap - Load Values from Database based on a user ID

I am creating a Phonegap application that requires user registration. I am doing this through a PHP Script acting as a web service to a MySQL database and using the AJAX POST/Get method.

For some reason LogCat is always giving me "There was an error" (falls in the error function of the post) .

UPDATED: From the logs of MySQL I am getting this error:
PHP Fatal error: Call to a member function bindValue() on a non-object
It points to this line: $username = $_POST['username'];

Here is a snippet of my JS code:

var u = $("#username").val();    
var p = $("#password").val();

var userRegData = $('#registration').serialize();

$.ajax({
  type: 'POST',
  data: userRegData,
  dataType: 'JSONp',
  url: 'http://www.somedomain.com/php/userregistration.php',
  success: function(data){   
      if(response==1){
          // User can be saved
      } else {
          // User exsts already 
      }
  },
  error: function(e){
      console.log('There was an error');
      $.mobile.loading ('hide'); 
  }
}); 
return false;

And here is a snippet of my PHP code. I am using PDO.

$db = new PDO('mysql:host=' . $config['db']['host'] . ';dbname=' . $config['db']['dbname'], $config['db']['username'], $config['db']['password']);
$db->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);

$username = $_POST['username'];
$password = $_POST['password'];
$query->bindValue(':username', $username, PDO::PARAM_STR);
$query->bindValue(':password', $password, PDO::PARAM_STR);

try {

$db->beginTransaction();

$db->query("SELECT `user`.`Username` FROM `user` WHERE `user`.`Username` = :username LIMIT 1");
try {
    if ( $query->rowCount() > 0 ) {
        $response=1;
        echo $response;
    }
    else {
        $response=0;
        $db->query("INSERT INTO `user` (`user`.`Username`, `user`.`Password`) VALUES :username, :password");
        echo $response; 
        $db->commit();  
    }
} catch (PDOException $e) {
    die ($e->getMessage());
}


} catch (PDOException $e) {
    $db->rollBack();
    die ($e->getMessage());
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by eggyal, obi NullPoiиteя kenobi, Ja͢ck, rlemon, Troy Alford Dec 26 '12 at 21:26

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
You should check your browser's XHR (Ajax) console what the back-end returns. The error must be in the back-end and not in the front-end. The other way of debugging this is hard-coding the POST values in the back-end and see what the error is. –  Blaise Dec 26 '12 at 13:40
    
Error is only thrown if your request fails, (404, 403, 500 errors). I would check to make sure your page actually returns a result. –  phpisuber01 Dec 26 '12 at 13:42
    
Make sure you're using JSONP –  jacktheripper Dec 26 '12 at 13:47
    
can u please try : console.log(e); in stead of console.log('There was an error'); and please let us know what is the output –  T.Baba Dec 26 '12 at 14:01
1  
fyi, you don not need to use the table name in front of all columns. you also do not need backticks for most column names unless they are reserved keywords. –  ThiefMaster Dec 26 '12 at 15:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It should be like

Your HTML Page

<html>
    <body>
        <script>
            function checkIfUserCanBeSaved(){
                var userRegData = $('#registration').serialize();

                $.ajax({
                  type: 'POST',
                  data: userRegData,
                  url: 'http://www.somedomain.com/php/userregistration.php',
                  success: function(data){   
                      if(response==1){
                          alert('user found');
                      } else {
                          alert('user saved')
                      }
                  },
                  error: function(e){
                      console.log('There was an error');
                      $.mobile.loading ('hide');
                  }
                });
                return false;
            }
        </script>
        <form id="registration">
            <input type="text" name="username">
            <input type="text" name="password">
            <input type="button" onclick="checkIfUserCanBeSaved()" value="submit">
        </form>
    </body>
</html>

Your PHP Page

$db = new PDO('mysql:host=' . $config['db']['host'] . ';dbname=' . $config['db']['dbname'], $config['db']['username'], $config['db']['password']);
$db->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);

$username = $_POST['username'];
$password = $_POST['password'];


try {

$db->beginTransaction();

try {

     $query = $db->prepare("SELECT user.Username FROM user WHERE user.Username = :username LIMIT 1");
     $query->bindValue(':username', $username, PDO::PARAM_STR);
     $query->execute();

    if ( $query->rowCount() > 0 ) {
        $response=1;
        echo $response;
    }
    else {
        $response=0;
        $query = $db->prepare("INSERT INTO user ( username, password ) VALUES ( :username, :password )" );
        $query->bindValue(':username', $username, PDO::PARAM_STR);
        $query->bindValue(':password', $password, PDO::PARAM_STR);
        $query->execute();
        echo $response; 
        $db->commit();  
    }
} catch (PDOException $e) {
    die ($e->getMessage());
}


} catch (PDOException $e) {
    $db->rollBack();
    die ($e->getMessage());
}
share|improve this answer
    
since im checking for a value in the database and then actually inserting, should this be considered as a POST or a GET in the JS? –  user1809790 Dec 26 '12 at 15:54
    
since you using a Ajax request of type 'POST', using $_POST['username'] should work. Using POST for such requests is also better than GET –  Akash Dec 26 '12 at 15:57
    
for some reason I am getting a parserError when I am trying it :( not sure what is going wrong –  user1809790 Dec 26 '12 at 15:59
    
is my Ajax call in the JS correct, or I have something wrong there. This is the first time for me doing ajax call and connecting with the dbase this way –  user1809790 Dec 26 '12 at 16:00
    
I have updated my answer with the HTML code, let me know if this works –  Akash Dec 26 '12 at 16:20

There are two basic problems here: You don't understand the limitations of JSONP, and you are using PDO incorrectly.

PDO

There are a few patterns of PDO usage. (You can abstract these patterns for clarity and code reuse, but fundamentally you have to use the objects in this order.)

Simple Queries

// 1. Get a database handle
$dh = new PDO($DSN, $USERNAME, $PASSWORD, array(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE=>PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION));

// 2. Issue a string query, no bindings!
$cursor = $dh->query('SELECT 1');

// 3. read results. There are many ways to do this:
// 3a. Iteration
foreach ($cursor as $row) {
    //...
}

// 3b. *fetch*
// You can use any one of multiple fetch modes:
// http://php.net/manual/en/pdostatement.fetch.php
while ($row = $cursor->fetch()) {
    //...
}

// 3c. *fetchAll*
//     *fetchAll* can also do some aggregation across all rows:
//     http://php.net/manual/en/pdostatement.fetchall.php
$results = $cursor->fetchAll();

// 3d. *bindColumn*
$cursor->bindColumn(1, $id, PDO::PARAM_INT);
while ($cursor->fetch(PDO::FETCH_BOUND)) {
    //$id == column 1 for this row.
}

// 4. close your cursor
$cursor->closeCursor();

Prepared statements

// 1. Get a database handle
$dh = new PDO($DSN, $USERNAME, $PASSWORD, array(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE=>PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION));

// 2. Prepare a statement, with bindings
$cursor = $dh->prepare('SELECT id, name FROM mytable WHERE name = :name');

// 3. Bind parameters to the statement. There are three ways to do this:
// 3a. via *execute*:
$cursor->execute(array(':name'=>$_GET['name']));

// 3b. via *bindValue*
$cursor->bindValue(':name', $_GET['name']);

// 3c. via *bindParam*. In this case the cursor receives a *reference*.
$name = 'name1';
$cursor->bindParam(':name', $name); // name sent to DB is 'name1'
$name = 'name2'; // name sent to DB is now 'name2'!
$name = 'name3'; // now it's 'name3'!

// 4. Execute the statement
$cursor->execute();

// 5. Read the results
//    You can use any of the methods shown above.

foreach ($cursor as $row) { // Iteration
    // ...
}

// 6. Don't forget to close your cursor!
//    You can execute() it again if you want, but you must close it first.

$cursor->closeCursor();

JSONP

There are many other problems with your code that seem to come down to you being unclear about what is traveling over the wire between the browser and the server.

JSONP is a technique to get around restrictions in browsers against cross-domain requests. It works by adding a script element to the current page with a url and a callback= query parameter. The server prepares a response with JSON, and then wraps the callback string around the JSON, turning the reply into a function call.

Example:

function doSomething(response) { response.name === 'bob'; response.callback === 'doSomething'; }

On the server:

header('Content-Type: text/javascript;charset=utf-8'); // NOT application/json!
echo $_GET['callback'], '(', $json_encode($_GET), ')';

Back to the browser, the script it gets back is:

doSomething({"name":"bob","callback","doSomething"})

As you can see, JSONP is fundamentally a hack. It doesn't use XMLHttpRequest. jQuery does some things to fake it in its $.ajax() function, but there are still limitations it can't escape:

  • The only possible method is GET (no POST) because that's what script src= does.
  • The only way to pass data to the server is via query strings.
  • Your response "callback" must be accessible from the global scope.
  • It is a huge security hole. You must trust the end server completely because it can output any script it wants.

If at all possible, use CORS instead of JSONP.

Suggested solution

This is an untested, suggested way of doing what you want.

Some notes:

  • The registration url is http://example.org/register. It always returns JSON, even for errors (you can change this). It also emits CORS headers, so you can POST to it using XHR from other domains.
  • The server code has a little bit of abstraction:
    • serviceRegisterRequest() is the main function which performs the action of the URL. It illustrates how to use PDO with proper exception handling. It returns an abstraction of an HTTP response.
    • userExists() and createUser() show how to use PDO prepared statements.
    • createUser() illustrates the proper use of the crypt() method to encrypt your passwords. (Do not store plaintext passwords!)
    • emitResponse() shows how to set CORS headers and how to produce JSON output.

On the browser, http://example.COM/register:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title>test registration</title>
<script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.8.3.min.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
    <form id="theform">
        <input name="u">
        <input name="p" type="password">
    </form>
    <script>
        $('#theform').submit(function(e){
            $.ajax({
                url: 'http://example.org/register',
                type: 'POST',
                data: $(e.target).serialize()
            }).done(function(response){
                console.log('SUCCESS: ');
                console.log(response);
            }).fail(function(jqXHR, textStatus){
                console.log('FAILURE: ');
                if (jqXHR.responseText) {
                    console.log(JSON.parse(jqXHR.responseText));
                }
            });
        });
    </script>
</body>

On the server:

function userExists($dbh, $name) {
    $ps = $dbh->prepare('SELECT id, Username FROM user WHERE Username = ?');
    $ps->execute(array($name));
    $user = $ps->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);
    $ps->closeCursor();
    return $user;
}

function createUser($dbh, $name, $pass, $salt) {
    $ps = $dbh->prepare('INSERT INTO user (Username, Password) VALUES (?,?)';
    $crypt_pass = crypt($pass, $salt);
    $ps->execute(array($name, $crypt_pass));
    $user_id = $dbh->lastInsertId();
    $ps->closeCursor();
    return array('id'=>$user_id, 'name'=>$name);
}

function serviceRegisterRequest($method, $data, $salt, $DBSETTINGS) {

if ($method==='POST') {
    $dbh = new PDO($DBSETTINGS['dsn'],$DBSETTINGS['username'],$DBSETTINGS['password']);
    $dbh->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);

    $response = array('status'=>200,'header'=>array(),'body'=>array());

    $dbh->beginTransaction(); // if using MySQL, make sure you are using InnoDB tables!
    try {
       $user = userExists($dbh, $data['u']);
       if ($user) {
          $response['status'] = 409; // conflict
          $response['body'] = array(
            'error' => 'User exists',
            'data'  => $user,
          );
       } else {
          $user = createUser($dbh, $data['u'], $data['p'], $salt);
          $response['status'] = 201; //created
          $response['header'][] = "Location: http://example.org/users/{$user['id']}";
          $response['body'] = array(
             'success' => 'User created',
             'data'    => $user,
          );
       }
       $dbh->commit();
    } catch (PDOException $e) {
       $dbh->rollBack();
       $response['status'] = 500;
       $response['body'] = array(
          'error' => 'Database error',
          'data'  => $e->errorInfo(),
       );
    } catch (Exception $e) {
       $dbh->rollBack();
       throw $e;  // rethrow errors we don't know about
    }
    return $response;

}

}


function emitResponse($response) {
    // restrict allowed origins further if you can
    header('Access-Control-Allow-Origin: *');
    header('Access-Control-Allow-Methods: POST');
    foreach ($response['header'] as $header) {
        header($header);
    }
    header('Content-Type: application/json', true, $response['status']);
    $output = json_encode($response['body']);
    header('Content-Length: '.strlen($output));
    echo $output;
    exit();
}

$DBSETTINGS = array(
    'dsn'=>'mysql:...',
    'username' => 'USERNAME',
    'password' => 'PASSWORD',
);
$salt = '$6$rounds=5000$MyCr4zyR2nd0m5tr1n9$';

$response = serviceRegisterRequest($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'], $_POST, $salt, $DBSETTINGS);
emitResponse($response);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 in spirit because I reached vote limit, though if you're already suggesting crypt() you could and should use bcrypt ($2y$). –  Ja͢ck Dec 26 '12 at 22:21
    
I am a newbie in PHP and tried your code though I would have had to change my logic completely. I understand that your code is more secure and pro, however I am only doing a demo and do not require such security. I have also saved the password in the database using sha1() –  user1809790 Dec 27 '12 at 9:07
    
Using a simple hash such as MD5 or SHA1, even with a salt, is almost as bad as a plaintext password. If even the PHP docs tell you it's not secure, that's saying something. However the point of my suggested code is not security, but clarity of interface and adherence to RESTful principles. –  Francis Avila Dec 27 '12 at 14:00

the serialize method is just to transform your variables into JSON array, i assume that you didn't gave the inputs names. So you should put names in your html to be something like this:

<form id="registration">
    <input type="text" name="username" ... 
    <input type="password" name="password" ...

Now when you run your code, the userRegData will be something like:

username=value_in_username_input&password=value_in_password_input
share|improve this answer
    
I already have the names, and when I tried alert($('#registration').serialize()); I get the same string you gave me. I am not sure what is happening cos then when I press ok, nothing happens - it goes to the error function instead of success –  user1809790 Dec 26 '12 at 14:31
    
The serialized form is like this: username=value_in_username&password=value_in_password&password-check=value_in_pa‌​ssword_check –  user1809790 Dec 26 '12 at 14:40
    
one more thing to try, can you please dump the post variables ? and let us see the output –  T.Baba Dec 26 '12 at 19:57

This should be a bit more helpful, you'll also need to then revise your sql. The issue is that you using two different methods of querying. Binding parameters requires using the Prepare statement.

$username = $_POST['username'];
$password = $_POST['password'];
//new query
$query = $db->prepare("SELECT `user`.`Username` FROM `user` WHERE `user`.`Username` = :username LIMIT 1");
// since you're only using one argument, the password in the prior query I did not bind this here.
$query->bindParam(':username' PDO::PARAM_STR);

try {

$db->execute();
share|improve this answer
    
I need to first check whether the user exists in the database using the SELECT statement, and if the user does not exist then I trigger the INSERT statement. That is why I have two statements in my code. However I am not sure whether this is the correct way of doing it –  user1809790 Dec 26 '12 at 16:04

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