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I wanted to verify in my own eyes the different between sleep and wait.

Wait can only be done in a synchronized block because it releases the ownership of the monitor lock. While sleep is not related to the monitor lock and a thread that is already the owner of the monitor lock shouldn't lose its ownership if sleeping.

For that i made a test:

Steps:

  1. Started a thread that waits in a synched block for 5 secs.
  2. Waited 3 secs and started another thread that acquires the monitor lock (because Thread-A is waiting) and simply sleeps for 5 secs while holding the monitor lock.

Expected result: Thread - A will only re-acquire the lock after 8 seconds, When Thread - B finally releases the monitor lock by exiting the synch block.

Actual result. Thread - A acquires the monitor lock after 5 seconds.

Can some1 explain to me what happened here?

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Runnable r1 = new Runnable() {

        @Override
        public void run() {

            System.out.println("r1 before synch block");
            synchronized (this) {

                System.out.println("r1 entered synch block");
                try {

                    wait(5000);
                    System.out.println("r1 finished waiting");

                } catch (InterruptedException e) {

                    e.printStackTrace();

                }

            }

        }

    };

    Runnable r2 = new Runnable() {

        @Override
        public void run() {

            System.out.println("r2 before synch block");
            synchronized (this) {

                System.out.println("r2 entered synch block");
                try {

                    Thread.currentThread();
                    Thread.sleep(5000);
                    //wait(5000);
                    System.out.println("r2 finished waiting");

                } catch (InterruptedException e) {

                    e.printStackTrace();

                }

            }

        }

    };

    try {

        Thread t1 = new Thread(r1);
        Thread t2 = new Thread(r2);

        t1.start();
        Thread.currentThread();
        Thread.sleep(3000);
        t2.start();

        t1.join();
        t2.join();
        System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " Finished joining");

    } catch (Exception e) {

        e.printStackTrace();

    }

}

EDIT:

Ok I understand my error - I waiting on this - r1/r2 and not on the same object.

Now I changed it and both acquire on the same object - The class instance of Main. 1. r1 acquires ownership of the monitor lock of Main.this 2. r1 Releases it. 3. When r1 tries to re-acquire it I get an exception:

Exception in thread "Thread-0" java.lang.IllegalMonitorStateException
at java.lang.Object.wait(Native Method)
at Main$1.run(Main.java:28)
at java.lang.Thread.run(Unknown Source)
on synchronized (Main.this)

What is the problem here?

public static void main(String[] args) {

        Main main = new Main();
        main.test();

    }

    public void test() {

        Runnable r1 = new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {

                System.out.println("r1 before synch block");
                synchronized (Main.this) {

                    System.out.println("r1 entered synch block");
                    try {

                        wait(5000);
                        System.out.println("r1 finished waiting");

                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {

                        e.printStackTrace();

                    }

                }

            }

        };

        Runnable r2 = new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {

                System.out.println("r2 before synch block");
                synchronized (Main.this) {

                    System.out.println("r2 entered synch block");
                    try {

                        Thread.currentThread();
                        Thread.sleep(5000);
                        //wait(5000);
                        System.out.println("r2 finished waiting");

                    } catch (InterruptedException e) {

                        e.printStackTrace();

                    }

                }

            }

        };

        try {

            Thread t1 = new Thread(r1);
            Thread t2 = new Thread(r2);

            t1.start();
            Thread.currentThread();
            Thread.sleep(3000);
            t2.start();

            t1.join();
            t2.join();
            System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " Finished joining");

        } catch (Exception e) {

            e.printStackTrace();

        }

    }
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

here's a much better way to make the test work , and show that it works . your problem was that you didn't wait correctly and used Thread.currentThread() for no reason .

btw, in case you want to use signalling of the wait-notifier mechanism without losing the signal , i suggest you read this link.

public class MAIN
  {
  public static void main(final String[] args)
    {
    final Object sync =new Object();
    final long startTime=System.currentTimeMillis();
    final Runnable r1=new Runnable()
      {
        @Override
        public void run()
          {
          System.out.println((System.currentTimeMillis()-startTime)/1000+": r1 before synch block");
          synchronized(sync)
            {
            System.out.println((System.currentTimeMillis()-startTime)/1000+": r1 entered synch block");
            try
              {
              sync.wait(5000);
              System.out.println((System.currentTimeMillis()-startTime)/1000+": r1 finished waiting");
              }
            catch(final InterruptedException e)
              {
              e.printStackTrace();
              }
            }
          System.out.println((System.currentTimeMillis()-startTime)/1000+": r1 exited synch block");
          }
      };
    final Runnable r2=new Runnable()
      {
        @Override
        public void run()
          {
          System.out.println((System.currentTimeMillis()-startTime)/1000+": r2 before synch block");
          synchronized(sync)
            {
            System.out.println((System.currentTimeMillis()-startTime)/1000+": r2 entered synch block");
            try
              {
              Thread.sleep(5000);
              System.out.println((System.currentTimeMillis()-startTime)/1000+": r2 finished waiting");
              }
            catch(final InterruptedException e)
              {
              e.printStackTrace();
              }
            }
          System.out.println((System.currentTimeMillis()-startTime)/1000+": r2 exited synch block");
          }
      };
    try
      {
      final Thread t1=new Thread(r1);
      final Thread t2=new Thread(r2);
      t1.start();
      Thread.sleep(3000);
      t2.start();
      t1.join();
      t2.join();
      System.out.println((System.currentTimeMillis()-startTime)/1000+":  Finished joining");
      }
    catch(final Exception e)
      {
      e.printStackTrace();
      }
    }
  }
share|improve this answer

The two threads actually hold two different locks. Say your class name is MyClass, change two lines of synchronized (this) to synchronized (MyClass.this), that makes the two threads to hold same lock.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right. Changed it as you said but not I get the IllegalMonitorStateException - shouldn't the Thread wait instead of throwing exception? –  ZiviMagic Dec 26 '12 at 14:47
2  
@ZiviMagic: no, wait is assuming you're locking on the object you're calling wait on, but you're locking on a different object, so it throws an exception. call Main.this.wait() instead. –  Nathan Hughes Dec 26 '12 at 17:07

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