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I need to sort hash using perl.

my hash is :

2 nameA
5 nameB
4 nameC
2 nameD
3 nameE

the result should be:

2 nameA
2 nameD
3 nameE
4 nameC
5 nameB

How do that ?

Thanks,

Miko

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2  
Also, wait a minute....2 appears as a key twice. –  Jack Maney Dec 26 '12 at 14:20
2  
As @JackManey states: a hash cannot have the same key twice, so the example you put is definitely not a Perl hash. What are your trying to do? –  m0skit0 Dec 26 '12 at 14:27
1  
No, it is impossible to have the same key twice, so you cannot have a hash like that. You can have data like that, but not a hash. –  TLP Dec 26 '12 at 14:32
1  
-1 that isn't a hash. –  Fraser Dec 26 '12 at 14:37
1  
no because the data structure can't exist, you can't have two items with the same key in an array or a hash. –  Fraser Dec 26 '12 at 14:41
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closed as not a real question by Fraser, Jack Maney, Dor Cohen, Jefffrey, false Dec 26 '12 at 17:17

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sort the keys and store them in an array. An array will preserve the order. I used a numerical sort here, since your keys were numerical.

my @sorted_keys = sort { $a <=> $b } keys %hash;

Now you can access them as you wish:

print "$_ $hash{$_}\n" for @sorted_keys;

You cannot, however, store the sorted result in a hash, because hashes are not ordered. And you cannot have a hash where the key 2 appears with two different values. It is impossible by design.

If you for example have that data in a file, you can do a Schwartzian transform. (Read the comments from the bottom and up and it will make sense):

open my $fh, "<", $filename or die $!;
my @sorted = map $_->[2],                   # Then map them back into the third
             sort {                     
                 $a->[0] <=> $b->[0] ||     # Sort them numerically on first
                 $a->[1] cmp $b->[1]        # ..or alphabetically on second col
             } map [ split, $_ ],           # Map them into a 3-element array ref
                 <$fh>;                     # Take all the lines in the file

The chained statements inside the sort will take effect when two values cannot be distinguished, e.g. "2" and "2" returns 0 from the <=> operator. In such cases, the sort will instead be alphabetically on the second column, which we stored in array element 1.

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foreach (sort keys %hash) {
  print "$_ : $hash{$_} \n";
}
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1  
feel free to had a little textual explanations :-) –  Stephane Rolland Dec 26 '12 at 14:44
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