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I have a simple div setup:

<div id="container">
    <div id="title"><h4>Title</h4></div>
    <div id="content"></div>
</div>

The #container element is set to a fixed height. I would like to have #content us all the available height, but I haven't found a clean cross-browser way to do this. Here is the CSS:

div {
  width: 100%;
}
#container {
  height: 400px;
}
#content {
  height: 100%;
}

But this results in #content having the same height as #container and overflows its parent.

A live example can be seen at http://jsbin.com/amekah/2/edit.


I should note that I'm writing a JavaScript library that appends the #content div to an input div element (#container in this example) so I don't want to fiddle too much with the layout of either the parent element or any child elements. I don't mind using JavaScript to calculate the available height dynamically.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ridiculously easy with Javascript. I'm currently doing something like that on my current project.

  1. Get the Height of the Container: elem.offsetHeight where elem is a javascript pointer to the object. In your example this would be:

    var containerHeight = document.getElementById('container').offsetHeight.

  2. Get the Height of Child Elements in the Container: Here's a link on how to properly get childNodes. Here's what I'd do:

    var lastChild = elem.childNodes[elem.childNodes.length - 1];
    var verticalOffset = lastChild.offsetTop + lastChild.offsetHeight; 
    

Now you have the height of the container AND the vertical offset from the top of the parent to the last child plus the height of the last child.

All that's left to do is calculate the difference and assign it as the height of #content.

document.getElementById('content').style.height = (containerHeight - verticalOffset) + "px";   

EDIT: Proof of Concept

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Just occurred to me you can make step two even easier by appending div#content to the container then getting its own offsetTop and using that in place of lastChild.offsetTop + lastChild.offsetHeight. Simpler and way more accurate. –  Akamaozu Dec 26 '12 at 15:53
    
The idea may be okay but this doesn't work in its current form. Not least because lastChild is a text node. –  MikeM Dec 26 '12 at 18:52
    
Oh ye of little faith. jsfiddle.net/jWPkL –  Akamaozu Dec 26 '12 at 21:15
    
But see and explain this please: jsbin.com/amekah/36/edit –  MikeM Dec 26 '12 at 23:04
    
Your exact code in jsfiddle.net: jsfiddle.net/XFqbt Clearly the variation is a result of jsbin.com. The code didn't change one bit ;) For good measure ... file in the browser for your benefit: designbymobius.ca/offsetTop.html Difference here is a reset stylesheet to normalize the weird behaviors between browsers (default prefixes etc). Once all of that is eliminated, everything works perfectly. Might have been presumptuous of me to assume one is being used, but I can't imagine any real projects that isn't resetting browser default styles to a certain extent. –  Akamaozu Dec 27 '12 at 5:01

The overflow issues is caused by the 100% declaration for the #content div. Take this property out.

If you would like the #content div to have 100% height WHILE overlapping the title div then you must use absolute position.

#container {
  height: 400px;
  position: relative;
}
#content {
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  position: absolute;
}
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Yes, that does get to fill the width, but without respecting the height of other child elements (like the #title div). –  Gingi Dec 26 '12 at 15:38
    
Is the height of #title fixed? –  ProfileTwist Dec 26 '12 at 16:13
    
No. The problem is that my library does not know a priori the CSS of any other elements. I can use JavaScript (see @Akamaozu's answer), but was hoping for an elegant CSS solution. :) –  Gingi Dec 26 '12 at 16:53
    
I'd be interested in an elegant CSS solution myself. I'm not a fan of using Javascript for something CSS is more than capable of handling. Fingers crossed that you find something. Like I said, I'm using JS for my current project; would be nice to chuck it out in favor of some CSS wizardry. –  Akamaozu Dec 26 '12 at 18:47
    
I'm afraid there is no pure CSS solution. Perhaps you should reconsider the necessity to define the parent's height. Usually, the parent height will be inherit from all of its child's divs. If you are designing for aesthetic purposes than look into styling the parent div directly instead of forcing the child to go all the way down. –  ProfileTwist Dec 27 '12 at 5:32

What about sharing the available container's height between title and content?

#container {
  background: #FEE;
  height: 400px;
}
#title {
  border: 1px dotted green;
  height : 20%;
}
#content {
  border: 1px dotted red;
  height: 80%;
}
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Even easier if you use jQuery:

function setHeight() {
  // using outer height to get margins and padding into account,
  // see http://jqapi.com/#p=outerHeight
  var titleHeight = $("#title").outerHeight(true), 
      totalHeight = $('#container').outerHeight(true);
  $('#content').outerHeight(totalHeight - titleHeight);      
}
// start on document.ready
$(function() {
  setHeight();
});
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If you don't mind using fixed height for your title element you can easily achieve this. The first step is to make the #container position relative, and then content can have absolute position with bottom set to 0 and top set to height of your title (see demo).

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I found a way to get #content to use the remainder of the available height:

#container { display: table }
#container > div { display: table-row }

You can see it here: http://jsbin.com/amekah/32/

I'm still not happy with it because it potentially changes other CSS elements that table rows don't have (like a border).

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#content actually has the same height as #container except that it overflows with #container because #title already eats some % of #container's height. You could try positioning your elements.

div {
  width: 100%;
}
#container {
  background: #FEE;
  height: 400px;
  position: relative;
}
#title {
  border: 1px dotted green;
  position: relative;
  z-index: 1; /* if you don't want #content overlapping with this element */
}
#content {
  border: 1px dotted green;
  height: 100%;
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  top: 0;
  z-index: 0;
}
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