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I've used this simple code that encrypts plain text. Then I tried to decrypt it using the same encrypting method but reversed in encryption section. There's a multiplication process that I don't know how to reverse it in the decryption code.

Here is the code:

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  s: String;
  count, ilength: Integer;
begin
  s := edit1.Text;
  ilength := Length(s);
  FOR count := 1 to ilength do
  begin
    s[count] := chr(ord(s[count]) * 4 + 1); // Encoding
  end;
  Label1.caption := s;
  // Display encoded text
  // Decoding section
  // This will probably be placed in another procedure.
  FOR count := 1 to ilength do
  begin
    s[count] := chr(ord((s[count]) / 4) - 1);
    // Here I Get An Error ! Please Help Guys, Thanks
  end;
end;
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1  
What does the error say? –  SLaks Dec 26 '12 at 15:53
4  
Security is hard. Don't invent your own crypto –  SLaks Dec 26 '12 at 15:53
    
@Slaks [DCC Error] Unit1.pas(47): E2008 Incompatible types –  Billo .S Dec 26 '12 at 15:54
    
@Slaks ,,I Don't Get It ?? Please Clarify What You're Trying To Say ? –  Billo .S Dec 26 '12 at 15:55
1  
@DavidHeffernan, yes sir, sorry for that, students can do nothing but bow for their respective teachers, and I think you are a great teacher. Thanks for help I will be avoiding those mistakes in the future. The fact is i'm really new here and English is not my native language, thanks a lot for your effort to put back on the right path. –  Billo .S Dec 26 '12 at 16:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You are trying to perform integer division. In Delphi you do that with div. The / operator is for floating point division. Looking at the code, you are trying to reverse this calculation:

ord(s[count]) * 4 + 1

You reverse that like this:

(ord(s[count]) - 1) div 4

However, your algorithm will not work. Consider what happens when you encrypt 64 and 128. You multiply by 4 to get 256 and 512 respectively. Then add one to get 257 and 513. Then you store back to an 8 bit data type and lose the higher order bytes. And so both characters are encoded to the value 1.

I'm assuming that you are using 8 bit text. But if you are using 16 bit text, your algorithm still fails in an exactly analogous fashion. Your proposed algorithm is not reversible.

I urge you to find an off-the-shelf encryption algorithm rather than trying to write your own. Encryption is hard to get right.

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It could be made to work if the factor 4 were replaced by an odd number, though, since those are invertible modulo 2^8. But I fully agree with you last sentence. –  Ilmari Karonen Dec 26 '12 at 16:00
    
@DavidHeffernan ,, Thank You Very Much ,, You Were Very Helpful To Me ,, Thanks a Lot ! –  Billo .S Dec 26 '12 at 16:01
    
@DavidHeffernan But this part of your answer I think I didn't get it correctly probably "Consider what happens when you encrypt 64 and 128. You multiply by 4 to get 256 and 512 respectively. Then add one to get 257 and 513. Then you store back to an 8 bit data type and lose the higher order bytes. And so both characters are encoded to the value 1. I'm assuming that you are using 8 bit text. But if you are using 16 bit text" what is 8 bit text and 16 bit text ? I tried large amounts of data and it decrypted it perfectly ! –  Billo .S Dec 27 '12 at 23:37
    
Which version of Delphi are you using? –  David Heffernan Dec 28 '12 at 7:38
    
@DavidHeffernan 2009 –  Billo .S Dec 28 '12 at 9:02

You're using / to do a division. This returns a floating point. use DIV instead to return an integer.

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1  
,, Thank YOUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU ,, It Worked Perfectly !!! –  Billo .S Dec 26 '12 at 15:59
    
@Billo.S - if this is the correct answer please mark it as accepted. –  Leonardo Herrera Dec 26 '12 at 18:32
1  
@LeonardoHerrera It's incomplete though. Replacing / with div is not enough. –  David Heffernan Dec 26 '12 at 19:17
    
@DavidHeffernan - this or the other one, I'm just reminding the OP about accepting an answer. –  Leonardo Herrera Dec 27 '12 at 13:15
    
@LeonardoHerrera accepted –  Billo .S Dec 27 '12 at 18:55

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