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I need to check whether a URL (represented by a NSURL) is available or returns 404. What is the best way to achieve that?

I would prefer a way to check this without a delegate, if possible. I need to block the program execution until I know if the URL is reachable or not.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 29 down vote accepted

As you may know already that general error can capture by didFailWithError method:

- (void)connection:(NSURLConnection *)connection didFailWithError:(NSError *)error {
    NSLog(@"Connection failed! Error - %@ %@",
          [error localizedDescription],
          [[error userInfo] objectForKey:NSErrorFailingURLStringKey]);
}

but for 404 "Not Found" or 500 "Internal Server Error" should able to capture inside didReceiveResponse method:

- (void)connection:(NSURLConnection *)connection didReceiveResponse:(NSURLResponse *)response {
    if ([response respondsToSelector:@selector(statusCode)])
    {
        int statusCode = [((NSHTTPURLResponse *)response) statusCode];
        if (statusCode == 404)
        {
            [connection cancel];  // stop connecting; no more delegate messages
            NSLog(@"didReceiveResponse statusCode with %i", statusCode);
        }
    }
}
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3  
Note that there's a handy class method on NSHTTPURLResponse to return a localized description for the error code: [NSHTTPURLResponse localizedStringForStatusCode: [response statusCode]] –  Jim Dovey Mar 20 '11 at 19:41

I needed a solution that didn't use a delegate either, so I took pieces of code shown in other answers here and created a simple method that works well in my case (and might be what you are looking for as well):

    -(BOOL) webFileExists {

        NSString *url = @"http://www.apple.com/somefile.html";

        NSURLRequest* request = [NSURLRequest requestWithURL:[NSURL URLWithString:url] cachePolicy:NSURLRequestUseProtocolCachePolicy timeoutInterval:5.0];
        NSHTTPURLResponse* response = nil;
        NSError* error = nil;
        [NSURLConnection sendSynchronousRequest:request returningResponse:&response error:&error];
        NSLog(@"statusCode = %d", [response statusCode]);

        if ([response statusCode] == 404)
            return NO;
        else
            return YES;
     }
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1  
That is not very useful on big files. It will download the entire file before returning a response –  Joris Mans Oct 6 '11 at 14:52
    
This works great, thanks. For others looking to do this, you might consider checking for a 200 status code so you know your file is accessible since any number of errors could occur besides a 404 such as 403 Forbidden and 500 Internal Server Error. Thanks! –  Clifton Labrum Jun 18 at 21:12

You can achieve a synchronous connection by calling:

NSURLRequest* request = [NSURLRequest requestWithURL:[NSURL URLWithString:url]];
NSHTTPURLResponse* response = nil;
NSError* error = nil;
[NSURLConnection sendSynchronousRequest:request returningResponse:&response error:&error];

Your thread will block until the request has beeen made.

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Synchronous requests block the GUI and also waste resources. Asynchronous does not and allows on top of that better error handling and canceling. –  MacMark Apr 18 '12 at 8:02
    
Nope, that's wrong. If nothing is at url, it won't block : NSURLConnection will download the content of the 404 webpage. But you can check the status code with [response statusCode] –  Martin Oct 1 '12 at 12:54
    
@MacMark Why do you assume a synchronous request will block the GUI? What if I've very carefully placed it in an NSOperation that won't? At which point -- to get to my question -- how exactly do they 'waste resources' compared to an asynchronous request? (For that matter, how do they allow for better error handling... unless you use the NSURlConnection protocol instead, which I think you can still do if you really want to, though it's a bit more complicated and if you've already threaded the operation, is completely counterproductive and a waste of resources itself!) –  RonLugge Nov 22 '12 at 3:40

I used the answer from woodmantech above, but changed it based on what I have seen on other similar questions here so that it does not download the whole file to see if it exists.

I changed NSURLRequest to NSMutableURLRequest, and added:

[request setHTTPMethod:@"HEAD"];

This seems to work fine. I am working on my first app, so no real experience yet. Thanks everyone.

 NSMutableURLRequest* request = [NSMutableURLRequest requestWithURL:[NSURL URLWithString:url] cachePolicy:NSURLRequestUseProtocolCachePolicy timeoutInterval:5.0];
    [request setHTTPMethod:@"HEAD"];
    NSHTTPURLResponse* response = nil;
    NSError* error = nil;
    [NSURLConnection sendSynchronousRequest:request returningResponse:&response error:&error];
    NSLog(@"statusCode = %d", [response statusCode]);
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