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I'm trying to invert a simple dictionary like:

{'a' : 1, 'b' : 2, 'c' : 3, 'd' : 4}

I'm using this function:

def invert(d):
    return dict([(x,y) for y,x in d.iteritems()])

Now when I invert my dictionary, everything works out fine. When I invert it twice however, I get:

{'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'b': 2, 'd': 4}

which is not in the same order as the dictionary I started with. Is there a problem with my invert function? Sorry I'm kinda new to python, but thanks for any help!

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This is a good video on dictionaries : blip.tv/pycon-us-videos-2009-2010-2011/… –  Ashwini Chaudhary Dec 26 '12 at 17:48

3 Answers 3

That is correct, dictionaries are unordered in python

from another so answer answer:

CPython implementation detail: Keys and values are listed in an arbitrary order which is non-random, varies across Python implementations, and depends on the dictionary’s history of insertions and deletions.

from the docs:

It is best to think of a dictionary as an unordered set of key: value pairs, with the requirement that the keys are unique (within one dictionary). A pair of braces creates an empty dictionary: {}. Placing a comma-separated list of key:value pairs within the braces adds initial key:value pairs to the dictionary; this is also the way dictionaries are written on output.

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Python dictionaries are unsorted by design.

You can use collections.OrderedDict instead if you really need this behaviour.

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Try running this code:

d = {
    'a' : 1, 'b' : 2, 
    'c' : 3, 'd' : 4
}

def invert(d):
    return dict([(x,y) for y,x in d.iteritems()])

print d

d = invert(d)

print d

d = invert(d)

print d

This is the output:

{'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'b': 2, 'd': 4}
{1: 'a', 2: 'b', 3: 'c', 4: 'd'}
{'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'b': 2, 'd': 4}

As you can see, it technically is the same dictionary, but when you declare it, it is unordered.

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