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I have a homework problem in which I have to deduct a fee for each transaction in a bank account which goes over the allotted number of free transactions. My problem is that my Math.max is not working for the deductMonthlyCharge class, instead of applying the charge only when the transaction go over the allotted amount, the program is charging the fee for EVERY transaction. I have no idea how to fix this. Also, I am supposed to reset the transaction count after every month. I have no idea how to do this. If someone could nudge me in the right direction, it would be greatly appreciated thanks.

Here is my BankAccount code:

public class BankAccount
{  
   private double balance;
   private double fee;
   private double freeTransactions;
   private double transactionCount;

   public BankAccount()
   {   
      balance = 0;
      fee = 5;
      freeTransactions = 5;
      transactionCount = 0;
   }

   public BankAccount(double initialBalance)
   {   
      balance = initialBalance;
      transactionCount = 0;
   }

   public void deposit(double amount)
   {  
      double newBalance = balance + amount;
      balance = newBalance;
      transactionCount++;
   }

   public void withdraw(double amount)
   {   
      double newBalance = balance - amount;
      balance = newBalance;
      transactionCount++;
   }

   public double getBalance()
   {   
      return balance;
   }    

   public void setTransFee(double amount)
   { 
       balance = amount+(balance-fee);
       balance = balance;
   }

   public void setNumFreeTrans(double amount) 
   {
       amount = freeTransactions;
   }

   public double deductMonthlyCharge()
   {
       double transCount = Math.max(transactionCount, freeTransactions);
       double fee = 2.00 * (transCount - freeTransactions);
       return fee;
   }
}

Here's my BankAccountTester code:

public class BankAccountTester
    {
        private BankAccount rockdown;
        public static void main(String[] args) {
            BankAccount rockdown = new BankAccount(1000.0);
            rockdown.deposit(1000);
            rockdown.withdraw(500);
            rockdown.withdraw(400);
            rockdown.deposit(200);
            System.out.println(rockdown.getBalance()- rockdown.deductMonthlyCharge());

            rockdown.deposit(1000);
            rockdown.withdraw(500);
            rockdown.withdraw(400);
            rockdown.deposit(200);
            rockdown.deposit(500);
            System.out.println(rockdown.getBalance()- rockdown.deductMonthlyCharge());

            rockdown.deposit(1000);
            rockdown.withdraw(500);
            rockdown.withdraw(400);
            rockdown.deposit(200);
            rockdown.deposit(500);
            rockdown.withdraw(1000);
            System.out.println(rockdown.getBalance()- rockdown.deductMonthlyCharge());
        }
    } 
share|improve this question
1  
I know this is homework, but financial transactions should never be done with a floating point type, like double or float. –  bowmore Dec 26 '12 at 18:23

4 Answers 4

You never set the freeTransactions in your non-default constructor so it defaults to 0:

public BankAccount(double initialBalance) 

You could call your default constructor from the overloaded one like so:

public BankAccount(double initialBalance) {   
   super();
   balance = initialBalance;
}

so that the statement freeTransactions = 5; is called.

share|improve this answer
    
I see freeTransactions = 5 in the constructor. What are you referring to? –  Makoto Dec 26 '12 at 18:11
    
That is in the default constructor but not the one that is being called –  Reimeus Dec 26 '12 at 18:12
    
Ah. this is true. Good catch. –  Makoto Dec 26 '12 at 18:12

You're missing a couple of lines from one of your constructors.

   public BankAccount()
   {   
      balance = 0;
      fee = 5;
      freeTransactions = 5;
      transactionCount = 0;
   }

   public BankAccount(double initialBalance)
   {   
      balance = initialBalance;
      fee = 5;
      freeTransactions = 5;
      transactionCount = 0;
   }
share|improve this answer

Math.max(a,b) is correct and returns the greater value. You may want to change your method to only calc a fee, if there is a fee to calc, thus there are not free transactions left.

Btw. freeTransactions and fee should be set by declaration or in construction.

public double deductMonthlyCharge()
   {
       double transCount = Math.max(transactionCount, freeTransactions) - freeTransactions;
       double fee = 0;
       if (transCount > 0) fee = 2.00 * transCount;
       return fee;
   }

Or am I wrong?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you guys. I got this fixed :D –  Daniel Ashfall Zhou Dec 26 '12 at 18:20

I would write it this way instead of trying to use Math.

if (transactionCount <= freeTransactions)
   return 0;
return 2 * (transactionCount - freeTransactions);
share|improve this answer
    
You missed that freeTransactions may be initialized to zero, which isn't wanted. –  tuergeist Dec 27 '12 at 11:03
    
@tuergeist It could be that free transactions are only available to new accounts. :| I don't know why the counts are double and not int or long and a bunch of other things I would do differently. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 27 '12 at 11:15

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