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I am using string.split() in my C# code for reading tab separated file. I am facing "OutOfMemory exception" as mentioned below in code sample.

Here I would like to know why problem is coming for file having size 16 MB?

This is right approach or not?

using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(_path))
{
  //...........Load the first line of the file................
  string headerLine = reader.ReadLine();

  MeterDataIPValueList objMeterDataList = new MeterDataIPValueList();
  string[] seperator = new string[1];   //used to sepreate lines of file

  seperator[0] = "\r\n";
  //.............Load Records of file into string array and remove all empty lines of file.................
  string[] line = reader.ReadToEnd().Split(seperator, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
  int noOfLines = line.Count();
  if (noOfLines == 0)
  {
    mFileValidationErrors.Append(ConstMsgStrings.headerOnly + Environment.NewLine);
  }
  //...............If file contains records also with header line..............
  else
  {
    string[] headers = headerLine.Split('\t');
    int noOfColumns = headers.Count();

    //.........Create table structure.............
    objValidateRecordsTable.Columns.Add("SerialNo");
    objValidateRecordsTable.Columns.Add("SurveyDate");
    objValidateRecordsTable.Columns.Add("Interval");
    objValidateRecordsTable.Columns.Add("Status");
    objValidateRecordsTable.Columns.Add("Consumption");

    //........Fill objValidateRecordsTable table by string array contents ............

    int recordNumber;  // used for log
    #region ..............Fill objValidateRecordsTable.....................
    seperator[0] = "\t";
    for (int lineNo = 0; lineNo < noOfLines; lineNo++)
    {
      recordNumber = lineNo + 1;
      **string[] recordFields = line[lineNo].Split(seperator, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);** // Showing me error when we  split columns
      if (recordFields.Count() == noOfColumns)
      {
        //Do processing
      }
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3  
As an aside, Eric Lippert has a great blog on OutOfMemoryExceptions. blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2009/06/08/… – Ray Booysen Sep 10 '09 at 10:17
    
Is this on the compact framework (i.e. Windows Mobile)? – MusiGenesis Sep 10 '09 at 12:06
    
@Ray: you can't trust someone who drives a Miata. – MusiGenesis Sep 10 '09 at 12:12
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Split is implemented poorly, and have serious performance issue when applied on huge strings. Please refer to this article for details on memory requirements by split function:

What happens when you do a split on a string containing 1355049 comma separated strings of 16 characters each, having total character length of 25745930 ?

  1. An Array of pointers to string object: Contiguous virtual address space of 4 (address pointer)*1355049 = 5420196 (arrays size) + 16 (for book keeping) = 5420212.

  2. Non-contiguous virtual address space for 1355049 strings, each of 54 bytes. It does not mean all those 1.3 million strings would be scattered all across the heap, but they will not be allocated on LOH. GC will allocate them on bunches on Gen0 heap.

  3. Split.Function will create internal array of System.Int32[] of size 25745930, consuming (102983736 bytes) ~98MB of LOH, which is very expensive L.

share|improve this answer

Try not reading the whole file into an array first "reader.ReadToEnd()" Read the file line by line directly ..

  using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(this._path))
        {
            string line = "";
            while(( line= sr.ReadLine()) != null)
            {
                string[] cells = line.Split(new string[] { "\t" }, StringSplitOptions.None);
                if (cells.Length > 0)
                {

                }
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Does it make impact when we read line by line – Hemant Kothiyal Sep 10 '09 at 11:26
    
It doesn't work if all my data is in just one line. – Butzke Nov 25 '15 at 15:15

Try reading the file linewise instead of splitting the whole content.

share|improve this answer

I would recommend reading line-by-line if you can, but sometimes splitting by new lines is not the requirement.

So you can always write your own memory efficient split. This solved the problem for me.

    private static IEnumerable<string> CustomSplit(string newtext, char splitChar)
    {
        var result = new List<string>();
        var sb = new StringBuilder();
        foreach (var c in newtext)
        {
            if ((c == splitChar))
            {
                if (sb.Length > 0)
                {
                    result.Add(sb.ToString());
                    sb.Clear();
                }
                continue;
            }
            sb.Append(c);
        }
        if (sb.Length > 0)
        {
            result.Add(sb.ToString());
        }
        return result;
    }
share|improve this answer

I use my own. It has been tested with 10 unit tests..

public static class StringExtensions
{

    // the string.Split() method from .NET tend to run out of memory on 80 Mb strings. 
    // this has been reported several places online. 
    // This version is fast and memory efficient and return no empty lines. 
    public static List<string> LowMemSplit(this string s, string seperator)
    {
        List<string> list = new List<string>();
        int lastPos = 0;
        int pos = s.IndexOf(seperator);
        while (pos > -1)
        {
            while(pos == lastPos)
            {
                lastPos += seperator.Length;
                pos = s.IndexOf(seperator, lastPos);
                if (pos == -1)
                    return list;
            }

            string tmp = s.Substring(lastPos, pos - lastPos);
            if(tmp.Trim().Length > 0)
                list.Add(tmp);
            lastPos = pos + seperator.Length;
            pos = s.IndexOf(seperator, lastPos);
        }

        if (lastPos < s.Length)
        {
            string tmp = s.Substring(lastPos, s.Length - lastPos);
            if (tmp.Trim().Length > 0)
                list.Add(tmp);
        }

        return list;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

can you debug and watch the headerLine before splitting?

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