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For the Longest Common Subsequence of 2 Strings I have found plenty examples online and I believe that I understand the solution.
What I don't understand is, what is the proper way to apply this problem for N Strings? Is the same solution somehow applied? How? Is the solution different? What?

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One possible solution uses Longest increasing subsequence. It is described in this book: Algorithms on Strings, Trees and Sequences by Dan Gusfield (Chapter 12.5.4) –  Evgeny Kluev Dec 26 '12 at 18:37

2 Answers 2

This problem becomes NP-hard when input has arbitrary number of strings. This problem becomes tractable only when input has fixed number of strings. If input has k strings, we could apply the same DP technique in by using a k dimensional array to stored optimal solutions of sub-problems.

Reference: Longest common subsequence problem

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Do you know of a reference example? –  Cratylus Dec 26 '12 at 19:55
    
Excuse me, do you mean a reference example to solve k strings LCS? –  ChengYi He Dec 26 '12 at 20:03
    
That's right.Do you know one? –  Cratylus Dec 26 '12 at 20:06
    
Sorry, so far I have no example. I would implement it tomorrow if available. It's too late and my mother is angry now. –  ChengYi He Dec 26 '12 at 20:30
    
But where is it noted that it is tractable for fixed number of strings? –  Cratylus Jan 24 '13 at 20:09

To find the Longest Common Subsequence (LCS) of 2 strings A and B, you can traverse a 2-dimensional array diagonally like shown in the Link you posted. Every element in the array corresponds to the problem of finding the LCS of the substrings A' and B' (A cut by its row number, B cut by its column number). This problem can be solved by calculating the value of all elements in the array. You must be certain that when you calculate the value of an array element, all sub-problems required to calculate that given value has already been solved. That is why you traverse the 2-dimensional array diagonally.

This solution can be scaled to finding the longest common subsequence between N strings, but this requires a general way to iterate an array of N dimensions such that any element is reached only when all sub-problems the element requires a solution to has been solved.

Instead of iterating the N-dimensional array in a special order, you can also solve the problem recursively. With recursion it is important to save the intermediate solutions, since many branches will require the same intermediate solutions. I have written a small example in C# that does this:

string lcs(string[] strings)
{
    if (strings.Length == 0)
        return "";
    if (strings.Length == 1)
        return strings[0];
    int max = -1;
    int cacheSize = 1;
    for (int i = 0; i < strings.Length; i++)
    {
        cacheSize *= strings[i].Length;
        if (strings[i].Length > max)
            max = strings[i].Length;
    }
    string[] cache = new string[cacheSize];
    int[] indexes = new int[strings.Length];
    for (int i = 0; i < indexes.Length; i++)
        indexes[i] = strings[i].Length - 1;
    return lcsBack(strings, indexes, cache);
}
string lcsBack(string[] strings, int[] indexes, string[] cache)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < indexes.Length; i++ )
        if (indexes[i] == -1)
            return "";
    bool match = true;
    for (int i = 1; i < indexes.Length; i++)
    {
        if (strings[0][indexes[0]] != strings[i][indexes[i]])
        {
            match = false;
            break;
        }
    }
    if (match)
    {
        int[] newIndexes = new int[indexes.Length];
        for (int i = 0; i < indexes.Length; i++)
            newIndexes[i] = indexes[i] - 1;
        string result = lcsBack(strings, newIndexes, cache) + strings[0][indexes[0]];
        cache[calcCachePos(indexes, strings)] = result;
        return result;
    }
    else
    {
        string[] subStrings = new string[strings.Length];
        for (int i = 0; i < strings.Length; i++)
        {
            if (indexes[i] <= 0)
                subStrings[i] = "";
            else
            {
                int[] newIndexes = new int[indexes.Length];
                for (int j = 0; j < indexes.Length; j++)
                    newIndexes[j] = indexes[j];
                newIndexes[i]--;
                int cachePos = calcCachePos(newIndexes, strings);
                if (cache[cachePos] == null)
                    subStrings[i] = lcsBack(strings, newIndexes, cache);
                else
                    subStrings[i] = cache[cachePos];
            }
        }
        string longestString = "";
        int longestLength = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < subStrings.Length; i++)
        {
            if (subStrings[i].Length > longestLength)
            {
                longestString = subStrings[i];
                longestLength = longestString.Length;
            }
        }
        cache[calcCachePos(indexes, strings)] = longestString;
        return longestString;
    }
}
int calcCachePos(int[] indexes, string[] strings)
{
    int factor = 1;
    int pos = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < indexes.Length; i++)
    {
        pos += indexes[i] * factor;
        factor *= strings[i].Length;
    }
    return pos;
}

My code example can be optimized further. Many of the strings being cached are duplicates, and some are duplicates with just one additional character added. This uses more space than necessary when the input strings become large.

On input: "666222054263314443712", "5432127413542377777", "6664664565464057425"

The LCS returned is "54442"

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