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This is -- as far as I can tell -- a strictly academic/theoretical question.

As I understand it (Vance Morrison, http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163715.aspx, "Volatile memory accesses cannot be created..."), the volatile keyword in C# -- among other things -- prevents any additional reads of the corresponding field from being introduced via "code motion".

There is a variant ( http://blogs.msdn.com/b/brada/archive/2004/05/12/130935.aspx ) of double-checked locking for C# that does not use volatile:

public sealed class Singleton
{
   private static Singleton value;
   private static object syncRoot = new object();

   public static Singleton Value
   {
      get
      {
         if (value == null)
         {
            lock (syncRoot)
            {
               if (value == null)
               {
                  Singleton newVal = new Singleton();
                  Thread.MemoryBarrier(); // ensures that all is ready to publish
                  value = newVal;
               }
            }
         }

         return value;
      }
   }     
}

However, if we assume only the ECMA memory model (rather than the stronger .NET 2.0 memory model), I wonder if this variant could fail? In other words (by attempted analogy with one of Morrison's constructions, under his Figure 8), suppose that the code looked like this:

public sealed class Singleton
{
   private static Singleton value;
   private static object syncRoot = new object();

   public static Singleton Value
   {
      get
      {
         Singleton register = value; // read the field into a register
         if (value == null) // re-read the field (for some unknown reason)
         {
            lock (syncRoot)
            {
               if (value == null)
               {
                  Singleton newVal = new Singleton();
                  Thread.MemoryBarrier();
                  value = register = newVal; // update the register and the field
               }
            }
         }

         return register; // return the reference from the register
      }
   }     
}

In the second code sample, if a thread were pre-empted immediately after reading the not-yet-initialized field into the register, and if the thread resumed sometime after some other thread had initialized the field, then the property would return null. If someone wrote it this way in code (using a local variable called register), I would think that it was broken. But could "code motion" -- in theory, if not in practice -- effectively turn the first sample (in code) into the second (for execution)? I believe that volatile would protect against this. And I don't know why any real-world system might re-read the field after copying the value to a register, but that's not the point I'm driving at. I guess my question really boils down to: under the ECMA memory model, is there anything about the transformation implied above (transforming the first sample into the second) that would be invalid (as a matter of "code motion")?

In the second code sample, from the standpoint of a single thread, the register certainly holds the same reference as the field by the time the register is read. But we know that we could be looking at a thread-shared field, and if it is valid for code motion to introduce reads of that field, then don't we run into the possibility that a read of the field could see a different value from the one currently held by the register? And if there is nothing (like volatile) to signal that this would be a problem, what actually would prevent code motion from interleaving reads of a field and a (hypothetical) register in this way (other than the absence of any reason to do so)? Entering the lock (and its imbedded MemoryBarrier) should (presumably) signal that a register -- a genuine register, not a local variable representing a register -- could be stale, but what if the thread never enters the lock (due to the preceding repeated reads)?

Obviously this is difficult to test, because the .NET memory model delivers stronger guarantees.

share|improve this question
    
Sure that's bad code. A jitter that would generate code like that is a broken jitter. Hard to say anything more beyond this, jitters are not broken like this. –  Hans Passant Dec 26 '12 at 21:14
    
@HansPassant, "broken" because it would be wasteful -- repeating the read -- or because it could fail under a weak memory model if not coached via volatile? I think present-day JITters display the latter characteristic -- in other situations -- so I doubt that is what you mean. But if the former characteristic would classify a JITter as "broken", then why is that not formulated as part of the memory model? Or is it (somehow)? Otherwise formal correctness depends on some unspecified notion of what dumb things a JITter shouldn't do... –  Will Montgomery Dec 26 '12 at 23:20
    
Broken because it doesn't implement the memory model. You magically assume that a jitter doesn't. Without a good example of one that does. Sure, it will be hard to find one, the guys that write one do pay attention. –  Hans Passant Dec 27 '12 at 0:06
    
@HansPassant, if you can explain how my example violates the memory model, I'd love to hear it. That's exactly what I am trying to ask about. Does this hypothetical transformation violate the ECMA memory model, and -- if so -- how? –  Will Montgomery Dec 27 '12 at 0:28
    
It is not an example. If you write this code in C# then it is obviously broken code that nobody would ever write. You like to assume that a jitter translates C# code to the equivalent of what you posted. A jitter doesn't do that, ever, it violates the memory model. (Screwed up my last comment, doesn't = does). –  Hans Passant Dec 27 '12 at 1:33

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