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What is a method group in C#?

What is the problem with the '+' signal to concatenate a string?

This is print screen of my problem:

http://pbrd.co/UtDf61

Json(new
{
    dom = "RegistroUsuario",
    type = "showErrorToast",
    msg = "Erro: " + e,
}, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);

string jsScript = "closeAndRedirectJson(" + Json + ")";

The error I am receiving is

Operation '+' cannot be applied to operands of type 'string' and 'method group'

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marked as duplicate by billinkc, Mark Wilkins, François Wahl, Stony, Dave Zych Dec 26 '12 at 21:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Json appears to be a function. A function is not a string. Also, we don’t want a link to a screenshot of your problem - please just include the code in your question and write out what the error is. –  minitech Dec 26 '12 at 19:43
1  
Please try not to post a link to an image, but instead post your code inside of the question itself. –  Dave Zych Dec 26 '12 at 19:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

As the error is clearly telling you, Json is neither a string nor an object.

Rather, it's a method group – a "reference" to function.
Unlike Javascript, C# functions are not objects; you can only use a method group to create a delegate instance. (which isn't what you want anyway)

If you want to convert your earlier object to a usable string of JSON, you'll need to use the JavascriptSerializer class directly.

The Json() method returns a JsonResult instance which can only be used to write the JSON to the response body; it's useless here.

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Thanks.. I´ll accept the awnser as soon as I am able to! –  Guilherme Longo Dec 26 '12 at 19:47
    
Of course, when + denotes delegate combination, one of its operands can be a method group. Maybe if f is a Func<object, string, JsonResult> or whatever signature is needed, then f + Json is allowed. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Dec 26 '12 at 21:33
    
@GuilhermeLongo: If you say so... :) –  SLaks Dec 27 '12 at 14:45

Consider the following:

static string X() { return "hello"; }
static void Main()
{
    Console.WriteLine(X + "goodbye");
}

Do you see the problem? The code concatenates the method X with the string "goodbye". But a method is not something that can be concatenated to a string! The intention was to call the method. The correct code is:

    Console.WriteLine(X() + "goodbye");

It is not clear to me from your program fragment what you intend to concatenate in there, but Json is a method, not something that can be concatenated with a string.

Incidentally, the reason that the compiler is using the somewhat confusing term "method group" in the error is because you might be in this situation:

static string X(int y) { return "hello"; }
static string X(double z) { return "hello"; }
static void Main()
{
    Console.WriteLine(X + "goodbye");
}

Now it is unclear which method X is referring to, and in fact, the C# language says that the expression X refers to both methods. Such an expression is classified as a "method group". The process of overload resolution picks a unique best method out of a method group.

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It's actually worse than that; Json() returns neither a string nor an object with a usable ToString(). –  SLaks Dec 26 '12 at 19:49

It's a function. Not a string. You can't use it with concatenation.

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1  
Wrong. That would compile too. It's a method group. –  SLaks Dec 26 '12 at 19:44
    
@SLaks Thanks. Updated. –  Soner Gönül Dec 26 '12 at 19:46

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