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I'm new to string manipulation and just trying to replace values in a list.

The two inputs I'm trying to fix are MCAFEE and PORT O'BRIAN.

So I run ucwords(strtolower($rawTitle)). But now I have Mcafee and Port O'brian when I need to show McAfee and Port O'Brian.

Focusing on Port O'brian first, this is my attempt, but obviously it does not work because it capitalizes the third letter of the string and not the third matched character like I'd like it to :(

$oPattern = "/O\'[a-z]/"; //Pattern to match
$doesMatch = preg_match($oPattern, $output, $matches); //Do I need to the perform operation?
if ($doesMatch == 1) {
    $letters = str_split($output);//break it out into an array
    $cappedLetter = strtoupper($letters[2]);//capitalize the 3rd letter
    $output = preg_replace("/O'$letters[2]/", $output, "O'$cappedLetter");//replace the O'x with O'X
    return $output;
}

Is there a different function I should be using here?

share|improve this question
    
Why not just use preg_replace instead of preg_match? –  Mike Brant Dec 26 '12 at 19:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, there is no generic way to do this if the casing information isn’t in the string. (Consider, for example, the two possible casings of the last name O'Hara/O'hara.) You could try it as best you could:

$title = ucwords(strtolower($rawTitle));
$title = preg_replace_callback('/(?<=O\'|Mc)./', function($match) {
    return strtoupper($match[0]);
}, $title);

But make sure to go over them manually afterwards.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, thank you. Would you mind going over the regex in detail? –  nipponese Dec 26 '12 at 20:19
1  
@nipponese: Sure! It just checks for anything (that’s the . at the end) that follows ((?<=...)) one of O' or Mc, and replaces it with an uppercase version of itself. –  minitech Dec 26 '12 at 20:27
    
And it misses "von" ;-) –  Ray Paseur Dec 26 '12 at 20:33
    
@RayPaseur: Hence "there is no generic way to do this". I didn’t really mean you should add von to the list, I just meant that it really does deserve going over manually :) –  minitech Dec 26 '12 at 20:35
    
I realize I am asking for the sun here, but it's not really meant to be a first class name parser, as it's meant to parse titles for a video production company, so this solution fixes 80%+ of the problem. –  nipponese Dec 26 '12 at 20:38

The rules for capitalizing names can be quite complicated. This is my teaching example of how to approach the issues. Please see http://www.laprbass.com/RAY_capitalize_names.php

<?php // RAY_capitalize_names.php
error_reporting(E_ALL);

// SOME TEST NAMES
$names = array
( "o'brien"
, 'MCAFEE'
, "barrett-o'reilly"
, "smith jones"
, "burns"
, "CROWTHER"
, "George w. bush, iiI"
, "RONALD    MCDONALD"
, "RONALD    MCDONALD-o'brien"
, "van De Graaff GeneratoR"
)
;

// TEST EACH CASE
foreach ($names as $name)
{
    echo "<br/>$name ";
    echo fixname($name);
}


// FUNCTION TO HANDLE NAMES
function fixname($name)
{
    // SPECIAL CASES FOR UPPER OR LOWER CASE DISPOSITION
    $uc = array  // UPPERCASE AFTER ANY OF THESE
    ( 'Mc'
    , "'"
    , '-'
    )
    ;

    $lc = array  // ALWAYS LOWER CASE
    ( 'Van De '
    )
    ;

    $mc = array  // ALWAYS UPPER CASE
    ( 'Iii'
    )
    ;

    // REMOVE UNNECESSARY BLANKS
    $name = preg_replace('/\s\s+/', ' ', $name);

    // START WITH LOWER CASE AND UPPER FIRST
    $name = strtolower($name);
    $name = ucwords($name);

    // CHECK FOR KNOWN SPECIAL UPPER-CASES
    foreach ($uc as $dlm)
    {
        // FIX THE Mcdonald EXAMPLE, ETC
        $namex = explode($dlm, $name);
        foreach ($namex as $k => $v)
        {
            $namex[$k] = ucwords($v);
        }
        $name = implode($dlm, $namex);
    }

    // CHECK FOR KNOWN CONSTANT LOWER-CASES
    foreach ($lc as $dlm)
    {
        // FIX THE van de Graaff EXAMPLE
        $name = str_replace($dlm, strtolower($dlm), $name);
    }

    // CHECK FOR KNOW CONSTANT UPPERCASE
    foreach ($mc as $dlm)
    {
        // FIX THE Bush, III EXAMPLE
        $name = str_replace($dlm, strtoupper($dlm), $name);
    }

    // RETURN THE REPAIRED STRING
    return $name;
}
share|improve this answer
    
As I mentioned, though, it is impossible to tackle the capitalization of names generically. O'Hara/O'hara. MacDonald/Macdonald. You also forgot to include von. –  minitech Dec 26 '12 at 20:29
    
It's only impossible in the edge cases. The overwhelming majority of correct capitalization can be done programatically. See the "Special Cases" arrays in the example above. In the instant case of this question the script tests out correctly, as shown in the link. And please feel free to copy my script and add "von" –  Ray Paseur Dec 26 '12 at 20:31
    
Oh, of course. Only in the edge cases, like... the first prime minister of Canada. And O'Hara is my name, O'hara is my friend's name. Is it so very rare as that? –  minitech Dec 26 '12 at 20:32

Throwing this solution out there.. Utilizes array functions to make your name in the casing you were looking for. It's dirty, but quick and effective.

1) Split by '

2) Uppercase the items array_walk()

3) implode.

4) Do the same for spaces

function nameFix(&$name, $key)
{
    $name = ucfirst($name);
}

function nameFixer($name)
{
    $array = explode(" ", $name);
    array_walk(
            $array, 
            function (&$name, $key) { 
                $name = explode("'", $name); 
                array_walk($name, 'nameFix'); 
                $name = implode("'", $name); 
            }
    );
    array_walk($array, nameFix);
    return implode(" ", $array);
}

echo nameFixer("mister port o'hare o'brian fredrickson"); 
// Returns: Mister Port O'Hare O'Brian Fredrickson
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