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I need to replace a selected character with as many copies of another character as necessary to fill up a determined space (exact 12 chars).

Example, replace char '1' with zero or more char '0':

ABC1           =>  ABC000000000
ABC1JKL        =>  ABC000000JKL
1JKL           =>  000000000JKL
1000           =>  000000000000
ABCDEFGHIJKL1  =>  ABCDEFGHIJKL
1ABCDEFGHIJKL  =>  ABCDEFGHIJKL
ABCDEFGHIJKL   =>  ABCDEFGHIJKL
1EFG1          =>  undefined (do not bother with this case)
EFG            =>  undefined (do not bother with this case)
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3  
2  
Curious... Have you tried anything yet? –  Buggabill Dec 26 '12 at 20:06
1  
Apparently not... Also, asking the same question multiple times will not speed up a response. –  Buggabill Dec 26 '12 at 20:08
    
Well, not the same question as I actually need to replace regex strings. From what I see there are two approaches to the solution, visualizing it as simple strings with sed or something similar, or using regular expression rules. Maybe it's the same solution, but to solve two similar, not identical problems. I searched with both ideas, it seems this might be easier to answer this. Do I delete the previous post? –  nhereveri Dec 26 '12 at 20:15
    
OK, I delete previous question. It is just string manipulation. Thanks for help me in edition. –  nhereveri Dec 26 '12 at 20:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since everybody is giving his own personal answer, here's my own brew (100% pure bash), probably a good candidate for a code-golf (and also probably one of the most efficient — no loop, no pipe, only one subshell (see end of post to get rid of it)):

$ string="ABC1"
$ echo "${string/1/$(printf "%.$((13-${#string}))d" 0)}"
ABC000000000

Do I win?

If you just can't believe that this one liner works, here you go:

$ while read string; do printf "%s%$((13-${#string}))s => %s\n" "$string" '' "${string/1/$(printf "%.$((13-${#string}))d" 0)}"; done < <(printf "%s\n" ABC1 ABC000000000 ABC1JKL 1JKL 1000 ABCDEFGHIJKL1 1ABCDEFGHIJKL ABCDEFGHIJKL 1EFG1 EFG)
ABC1          => ABC000000000
ABC000000000  => ABC000000000
ABC1JKL       => ABC000000JKL
1JKL          => 000000000JKL
1000          => 000000000000
ABCDEFGHIJKL1 => ABCDEFGHIJKL
1ABCDEFGHIJKL => ABCDEFGHIJKL
ABCDEFGHIJKL  => ABCDEFGHIJKL
1EFG1         => 00000000EFG1
EFG           => EFG

Want to get rid of the subshell in this method? Easy, but you'll need an auxiliary variable:

$ string="ABC1"
$ printf -v aux "%.$((13-${#string}))d" 0
$ echo "${string/1/$aux}"
ABC000000000
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Nice! Thanks for all! –  nhereveri Dec 31 '12 at 15:53

Using bash's Parameter expansion:

#! /bin/bash
inputs=(ABC1             
    ABC1JKL          
    1JKL             
    1000             
    ABCDEFGHIJKL1    
    1ABCDEFGHIJKL    
    ABCDEFGHIJKL     
)

outputs=(ABC000000000
    ABC000000JKL
    000000000JKL
    000000000000
    ABCDEFGHIJKL
    ABCDEFGHIJKL
    ABCDEFGHIJKL
)

for ((i=0; i<${#inputs[@]}; i++)) ; do
    x=${inputs[i]}
    while [[ ${x:12} ]] ; do               # Shorten if too long
        x=${x/1}
    done
    while [[ ${x:11} == '' ]] ; do         # Insert 1's if too short
        x=${x/1/11}
    done
    x=${x//1/0}
    [[ $x == ${outputs[i]} ]] || echo Different $x
done
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A solution in awk:

{
  temp = $1
  gsub (/[^1]/, "", temp)
  if (length(temp) == 1) {
    l = 12 - (length ($1) - 1)
    if (l > 0) {
      t = "000000000000"
      sub (/1/, substr (t,0,l), $1)
    }
  }
  print $1
}

And a solution in bash/sed:

#!/bin/bash

while read n; do
  temp=$(echo $n | sed 's/[^1]//g')
  if [[ ${#temp} == 1 ]]; then
    l=$(( 12 - $(( ${#n} - 1)) ))
    if [[ $l > 0 ]]; then
      t=000000000000
      n=$(echo $n | sed "s/1/${t:0:$l}/")
    fi
  fi
  echo $n
done
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No, it isn't. But your solution is better. And it actually isn't needed, got leftover from an earlier iteration. I will edit and remove it. –  Brad Lanam Dec 26 '12 at 21:29

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