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I am trying to implement a basic event loop with pselect, so I have blocked some signals, saved the signal mask and used it with pselect so that the signals will only be delivered during that call.

If a signal is sent outside of the pselect call, it is blocked until pselect as it should, however it does not interrupt the pselect call. If a signal is sent while pselect is blocking, it will be handled AND pselect will be interrupted. This behaviour is only present in OSX, in linux it seems to function correctly.

Here is a code example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/select.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <signal.h>

int shouldQuit = 0;

void signalHandler(int signal)
{
    printf("Handled signal %d\n", signal);
    shouldQuit = 1;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{    
    sigset_t originalSignals;     
    sigset_t blockedSignals;
    sigemptyset(&blockedSignals);
    sigaddset(&blockedSignals, SIGINT);
    if(sigprocmask(SIG_BLOCK, &blockedSignals, &originalSignals) != 0)
    {
        perror("Failed to block signals");
        return -1;
    }

    struct sigaction signalAction;
    memset(&signalAction, 0, sizeof(struct sigaction));

    signalAction.sa_mask = blockedSignals;

    signalAction.sa_handler = signalHandler;

    if(sigaction(SIGINT, &signalAction, NULL) == -1)
    {
        perror("Could not set signal handler");
        return -1;
    }

    while(!shouldQuit)
    {
        fd_set set;
        FD_ZERO(&set);
        FD_SET(STDIN_FILENO, &set);
        printf("Starting pselect\n");
        int result = pselect(STDIN_FILENO + 1, &set, NULL, NULL, NULL, &originalSignals);
        printf("Done pselect\n");
        if(result == -1)
        {
            if(errno != EAGAIN && errno != EWOULDBLOCK && errno != EINTR)
            {
                perror("pselect failed");
            }
        }
        else
        {
            printf("Start Sleeping\n");
            sleep(5);
            printf("Done Sleeping\n");
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

The program waits until you input something on stdin, then sleeps for 5 seconds. To create the problem, "a" is typed to create data on stdin. Then, while the program is sleeping, an INT signal is sent with Crtl-C.

On Linux:

Starting pselect
a
Done pselect
Start Sleeping
^CDone Sleeping
Starting pselect
Handled signal 2
Done pselect

On OSX:

Starting pselect
a
Done pselect
Start Sleeping
^CDone Sleeping
Starting pselect
Handled signal 2
^CHandled signal 2
Done pselect
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Confirmed that it acts that way on OSX, and if you look at the source for pselect (http://www.opensource.apple.com/source/Libc/Libc-320.1.3/gen/FreeBSD/pselect.c), you'll see why.

After sigprocmask() restores the signal mask, the kernel delivers the signal to the process, and your handler gets invoked. The problem here is, that the signal can be delivered before select() gets invoked, so select() won't return with an error.

There's some more discussion about the issue at http://lwn.net/Articles/176911/ - linux used to use a similar userspace implementation that had the same problem.

If you want to make that pattern safe on all platforms, you'll have to either use something like libev or libevent and let them handle the messiness, or use sigprocmask() and select() yourself.

e.g.

    sigset_t omask;
    if (sigprocmask(SIG_SETMASK, &originalSignals, &omask) < 0) {
        perror("sigprocmask");
        break;
    }

    /* Must re-check the flag here with signals re-enabled */
    if (shouldQuit) 
        break;

    printf("Starting select\n");
    int result = select(STDIN_FILENO + 1, &set, NULL, NULL, NULL);
    int save_errno = errno;
    if (sigprocmask(SIG_SETMASK, &omask, NULL) < 0) {
        perror("sigprocmask");
        break;
    }

    /* Recheck again after the signal is blocked */
    if (shouldQuit) 
        break;

    printf("Done pselect\n");

    if(result == -1)
    {
        errno = save_errno;
        if(errno != EAGAIN && errno != EWOULDBLOCK && errno != EINTR)
        {
            perror("pselect failed");
        }
    }

There are a couple of other things you should do with your code:

  • declare your 'shouldQuit' variable as volatile sig_atomic_t

    volatile sig_atomic_t shouldQuit = 0;

  • always save errno before calling any other function (such as printf()), since that function may cause errno to be overwritten with another value. Thats why the code above aves errno immediately after the select() call.

Really, I strongly recommend using an existing event loop handling library like libev or libevent - I do, even though I can write my own, because it is so easy to get wrong.

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