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I'm trying to download a single array off of Oracle 11g into Python using the cur.fetchall command. I'm using the following syntax:

 con = cx_Oracle.connect('xxx')
 print con.version
 cur = con.cursor()
cur.execute("select zc.latitude from  orders o, zip_code zc where o.date> '24-DEC-12'     and TO_CHAR(zc.ZIP_CODE)=o.POSTAL_CODE")
latitudes = cur.fetchall()
cur.close()
print latitudes

when I print latitudes, I get this:

[(-73.98353999999999,), (-73.96565,), (-73.9531,),....]

the problems is that when I try to manipulate the data -- in this case, via:

x,y = map(longitudes,latitudes)

I get the following error -- note, I'm doing the same exact type of syntax to create 'longitudes':

TypeError: a float is required

I suspect this is because cur.fetchall is returning tuples with commas inside the tuple elements. How do I run the query so I don't get the comma inside the parenthesis, and get an array instead of a tuple? Is there a nice "catch all" command like cur.fetchall, or do I have to manually loop to get the results into an array?

my full code is below:

from mpl_toolkits.basemap import Basemap
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
import cx_Oracle
con = cx_Oracle.connect('xxx')
print con.version
cur = con.cursor()
cur.execute("select zc.latitude from  orders o, zip_code zc where     psh.ship_date> '24-DEC-12' and TO_CHAR(zc.ZIP_CODE)=o.CONSIGNEE_POSTAL_CODE")
latitudes = cur.fetchall()
cur.close()

cur = con.cursor()
cur.execute("select zc.longitude from  orders o, zip_code zc where psh.ship_date> '24-DEC-12' and TO_CHAR(zc.ZIP_CODE)=o.CONSIGNEE_POSTAL_CODE")
longitudes = cur.fetchall()
print 'i made it!'
print latitudes
print longitudes
cur.close()
con.close()
map = Basemap(resolution='l',projection='merc',         llcrnrlat=25.0,urcrnrlat=52.0,llcrnrlon=-135.,urcrnrlon=-60.0,lat_ts=51.0)
# draw coastlines, country boundaries, fill continents.
map.drawcoastlines(color ='C')
map.drawcountries(color ='C')
map.fillcontinents(color ='k')
# draw the edge of the map projection region (the projection limb)
map.drawmapboundary()
# draw lat/lon grid lines every 30 degrees.
map.drawmeridians(np.arange(0, 360, 30))
map.drawparallels(np.arange(-90, 90, 30))
plt.show()
# compute the native map projection coordinates for the orders.
x,y = map(longitudes,latitudes)
# plot filled circles at the locations of the orders.
map.plot(x,y,'yo')
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2 Answers 2

The trailing commas are fine that is valid tuple syntax and what you get when you print a tuple.

I don't know what you are trying to achieve, but map is probably not what you want. map takes a function and a list as arguments but you are giving it 2 lists. Something more useful might be to retrieve the latitude and longitude from the database together:

cur.execute("select zc.longitude, zc.latitude from  orders o, zip_code zc where o.date> '24-DEC-12'     and TO_CHAR(zc.ZIP_CODE)=o.POSTAL_CODE")

Update to Comments

From the original code it looks like you are trying to use the built-in map function which is not the case from your updated code.

The reason you are getting the TypeError is matplotlib is expecting a list of floats but you are providing a list of one tuples. you can unwrap the tuples from your original latitudes with a simple list comprehension (the map built-in would also do the trick):

[row[0] for row in latitudes]

Using one query to return the latitudes and longitudes:

cur.execute("select zc.longitude, zc.latitude from...")
points = cur.fetchall()
longitudes = [point[0] for point in longitudes]
latitudes = [point[1] for point in latitudes]

Now longitudes and latitudes are lists of floats.

share|improve this answer
    
To further explain, I'm using Basemap to plot latitudes and longitudes over a map of the US. here's my whole code: –  Bryan Dec 26 '12 at 20:55
    
I've put my whole code above, but basically I'm trying to plot orders geographically. I've had no problem in the past passing two arrays into map() via x,y=map(array1, array2) so I suspect that isn't the problem. Please correct me if I'm wrong though. If you think that retrieving latitude and longitude together makes more sense, could you please show how I would pass this into map() and then map.plot()? –  Bryan Dec 26 '12 at 21:02
    
I copied your code verbatim, but when I print out 'latitudes' and 'longitudes' i get: –  Bryan Dec 26 '12 at 21:55
    
I copied your code verbatim, but when I print out 'latitudes' and 'longitudes' i get: [], i.e. the arrays are not filled. Am I missing something? I had to define latitudes and longitudes as arrays to avoid error: the name is undefined. Here's the new code: import cx_Oracle con = cx_Oracle.connect('xxx') cur = con.cursor() cur.execute("select zc.latitude, zc.longitude...") points = cur.fetchall() longitudes=[] latitudes=[] longitudes = [point[0] for point in longitudes] latitudes = [point[1] for point in latitudes] cur.close() con.close() –  Bryan Dec 26 '12 at 22:00

Found another way to tackle this -- check out TypeError: "list indices must be integers" looping through tuples in python. Thanks for your hard work in helping me out!

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