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The problem is that I'm trying to display a table of n and n^2 for numbers 1 - 10 and it all seems to be fine except for the first set of numbers. It seems that the program, probably due to my poor coding, thinks that 1*1=2. I've tried rearranging the code and using different loops but the closest I can get is displaying all other numbers correctly except for the first set.

Here is the code:

int main (void)
{

    int num, num2, exp;

    num = 0;

    printf ("\nPROGRAM TO DETERMINE SQUARES OF NUMBERS 1 THROUGH 10\n\n");
    printf (" -Numbers---                         ---Squares- \n"); 
    printf ("-------------------------------------------------\n");   

    for (num2 = num + 1; num2 <= 10; exp = num2*num2)   
        {
        printf ("   %3d                                   %3d\n", num2, exp);
        printf ("  ----------------------------------------------\n");
             ++num2; 
        }
}

I'm sure the solution is simple, but after hours of recoding I can't figure it out.

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closed as too localized by Jens Gustedt, Jonathan Leffler, WhozCraig, t0mm13b, Bhavik Ambani Dec 27 '12 at 1:52

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10  
That's not how for is supposed to be used... –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 26 '12 at 20:34
3  
I can't imagine how you came up with this stuff in response to such a straightforward request. :S –  Matteo Italia Dec 26 '12 at 20:35
    
Using a debugger to trace the execution step by step will show you where you are going wrong. –  Vincent Ramdhanie Dec 27 '12 at 1:49

1 Answer 1

Why does num even exist? I would do it like this, also put the loop content in the loop instead of the loop control -- makes the logic easier I believe:

int main (void)
{

    int num2, exp;

    printf ("\nPROGRAM TO DETERMINE SQUARES OF NUMBERS 1 THROUGH 10\n\n");
    printf (" -Numbers---                         ---Squares- \n"); 
    printf ("-------------------------------------------------\n");   

    for (num2 = 1; num2 <= 10; num2++)   
    {
        exp = num2*num2;
        printf ("   %3d                                   %3d\n", num2, exp);
        printf ("  ----------------------------------------------\n");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why does exp even exist? printf ("%3d %3d\n", num2, num2*num2); ;) –  Blue Moon Dec 26 '12 at 20:40
    
@KingsIndian - Your point is well taken -- It is a style issue -- I think exp makes the program clearer where num made it less clear. Of course I could get rid of all the variables, but I don't think that is as clear. –  Hogan Dec 26 '12 at 20:42
    
@Hogan, this does exactly what I wanted it to do, THANK YOU!! –  stealthonion Dec 26 '12 at 20:50
    
@KingsIndian, actually, I only had one num variable at first, and changing it to two num variables didn't change anything, as I hoped it would. The result was the same, wether I had one or two, I just added an extra step to see if it changed anything and it didn't, and I forgot to take it out. –  stealthonion Dec 26 '12 at 20:51

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