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Hi guys, Is there a way to 'detect' what exceptions function/method raises? exemplifying:

def foo():
    print 'inside foo, next calling bar()'
    _bar()
    _baz()
    # lots of other methods calls which raise other legitimate exceptions

def _bar():
    raise my_exceptions.NotFound

def _baz():
    raise my_exceptions.BadRequest

so, supposing that foo is part of my API and I need to document it, is there a way to get all exceptions that can be raised from it?

Just to be clear I don't want to handle those exceptions, they are supposed to happen (when a resource is not found or the request is malformed for instance).

I'm thinking to create some tool that transform that sequence of code in something 'inline' like:

def foo():
    print 'inside foo, next calling bar()'
    # what _bar() does
    raise my_exceptions.NotFound
    # what _baz() does
    raise my_exceptions.BadRequest
    # lots of other methods calls which raise other legitimate exceptions

is there anything that can help me detect that instead of navigate through each method call? (which goes deep into several files)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't reasonably do this with Python, for a few reasons:

1) The Python primitives don't document precisely what exceptions they can throw. The Python ethos is that anything can throw any exception at any time.

2) Python's dynamic nature makes it very difficult to statically analyze code at all, it's pretty much impossible to know what code "might" do.

3) All sorts of uninteresting exceptions would have to be in the list, for example, if you have self.foo, then it could raise AttributeError. It would take a very sophisticated analyzer to figure out that foo must exist.

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Got it... thanks! About your 3rd point: I don't want this kind of 'detection', what I want is just get all explicit raised exceptions, not the ones that the interpreter can raise like the AttributeError. –  maurorodrigues Dec 26 '12 at 21:11
    
wow, just realized that you're Ned Batchelder, the guy behind coverage module right? What I was thinking to do was pretty much inspired by your module, but not that complex hehe... I agree that python dynamic nature makes impossible to do a analyzer that is 100% of times right, but it would be just to have general idea of what is raised instead of read method by method what is being raised. –  maurorodrigues Dec 26 '12 at 21:16
    
:) glad to have you on the team! :) –  Ned Batchelder Dec 26 '12 at 22:45

No, because of the dynamic nature of Python. How would your tool work if a function took another function chosen at runtime (very common), or if the code is later monkeypatched?

There's simply no way to know ahead of time (in enough situations for it to be useful), what the interpreter is going to do through static analysis. You effectively have to run the interpreter and see what happens, which of course could change between runs...

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"You effectively have to run the interpreter and see what happens, which of course could change between runs…" But that's insane! I can't know in advance what might happen at some time given certain circumstances! –  Protector one Nov 25 '13 at 10:04

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