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I want to perform basic arithmetic operations like addition, substraction, multiplication and division using only one generic method per operation for wrapper types like Integer, Float, Double ... (excluding BigDecimal and BigInteger).

I have tried to do something like the following (for addition) using a generic class.

public final class GenericClass<E extends Number>
{        
    public E add(E x, E y)
    {
        return x+y; // Compile-time error
    }
}

It issues a compile-time error,

operator + cannot be applied to E,E

Is there a way to use such a generic version to achieve such operations?

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1  
this sounds like overengineering the problem domain. –  Woot4Moo Dec 26 '12 at 21:05

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, there isn't a way to do this, or else it would be built into Java. The type system isn't strong enough to express this sort of thing.

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No, you can't do that because the + operator is not part of the Number class. What you can do is to create an abstract base class and extends from it:

static void test() {

    MyInteger my = new MyInteger();
    Integer i = 1, j = 2, k;
    k = my.add(i, j);
    System.out.println(k);
}

static public abstract class GenericClass<E extends Number> {
    public abstract E add(E x, E y);
}

static public class MyInteger extends GenericClass<Integer> {
    @Override
    public Integer add(Integer x, Integer y) {
        return x + y;
    }       
}

(I made these classes static in order to facilitate the testing but you can remove this modifier.)

You could also add an abstract function that will take and return parameters and return value of type Number and override it and the subclasses but the required casting for the return value will defeat its usefulness.

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Regarding the scenario in the question, there is no meaning to use a generic class in this way. Additionally, declaring a static class in this way is not allowed in Java (this is however the case with C#). A static class must have at lest one none-static enclosing class (outermost classes cannot be static) i.e. a static class must be contained by at least one outermost none-static class. –  Lion Dec 27 '12 at 0:31
    
For the static classes, I did not say that I was not enclosing them into another class. I made these static simply because I was instanciating them from a static function but you're right, it would have been simpler to just remove this word everywhere. As to your other statement, "Regarding the scenario in the question, there is no meaning to use a generic class in this way", I'm not totally sure to understand what you are saying but lets me just say that's simply impossible in Java to solve the original scenario exactly as described. –  SylvainL Dec 27 '12 at 1:03

All I can think of is receiving the type as an unknown type and use instance of.

Something like:

public class GenericClass<? extends Number>{
    public Integer add(? x, ? y){
        if(x instance of Integer && y instance of Integer){
            //Do your math with Integer class methods help
            //Return here
        }
        return (Interger)null;
    }

} 

But not sure :/

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Generally you don't need this as it's simpler and more efficient to use a "super" type like double or BigDecimal which can represent any value of any type.

Note: a double uses less than half the space of an Integer with a reference to it.

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Number is a class type, so the primitive type operators do not apply. Additionally, generics in Java don't support primitive types, so you won't be able to bind E to allow primitive types only.

One way around this would be to handle each primitive type that Number supports separately in the Add method, but I think that defeats what you're trying to accomplish.

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As suggested by Afonso, another possibility would be to create a function and write down all the required possibilities. Here are some variations:

      // Examples with static functions:
        Integer i = addNumbers (1, 2); // OK
        Double d = addNumbers (3.0, 4.0); // OK
        String s = addObjects ("a", "b"); // OK
//
      // Example with a raw type for a class with both method
      // (or member function) and static functions:
GenericClass gc = new GenericClass();  // Raw type
//
      // Note the error if we don't add a cast:
// i = gc.add(1, 2); // Error: Cannot convert from Number to Integer
//
      // Now OK with a cast but with a Type safety warning:
        i = (Integer) gc.add (1, 2); // Type safety warning.
        i = GenericClass.add2 (1, 2); // OK
        i = GenericClass.add3 (1, 2); // OK
//    
      // Example with an instanciated type for the same class:
        GenericClass<Integer> gc1 = new GenericClass<Integer>();
//
      // Note that we don't need a cast anymore:
        i = gc1.add(1, 2); // Now OK even without casting.
//
        i = GenericClass2.add2 (1, 2); // OK
        s = GenericClass2.add2 ("a", "b"); // OK
        i = GenericClass2.<Integer>add2 (1, 2); // OK.
        d = GenericClass2.<Double>add2 (1.0, 2.0); // OK
        s = GenericClass2.<String>add2 ("a", "b"); // OK
//  
    public static<T extends Number> T addNumbers(T x, T y) {

        if (x instanceof Integer && y instanceof Integer){
            return (T) (Integer) ((Integer)x + (Integer)y);
        } else if (x instanceof Double && y instanceof Double){
            return (T) (Double) ((Double)x + (Double)y);
        } else
            return (T)null;
    }
//    
    public static<T> T addObjects(T x, T y) {

        if (x instanceof Integer && y instanceof Integer) {
      //
      // We must add an (Integer) cast because the type of the operation
      // "((Integer)x + (Integer)y))" is "int" and not "Integer" and we
      // cannot directly convert from "int" to "T".  Same thing for Double
      // but not for the type String:
      //
            return (T) (Integer) ((Integer)x + (Integer)y);
        } else if (x instanceof Double && y instanceof Double) {
            return (T) (Double) ((Double)x + (Double)y);
      } else if (x instanceof String && y instanceof String) {
            return (T) ((String)x + (String)y);            
      } else
            return (T)null;
    }
 //  
    static class GenericClass<T extends Number> {

        public T add(T x, T y) {
            if (x instanceof Integer && y instanceof Integer) {
                return (T) (Integer) ((Integer)x + (Integer)y);
            } else if (x instanceof Double && y instanceof Double) {
                return (T) (Double) ((Double)x + (Double)y);
            } else
                return (T)null;
        }
 //   
        // The type <T> here is NOT the same as the one for the class.
        // We should rename it in order to make this clearer. See add3() 
        // for an example of this.
        public static<T> T add2(T x, T y) {
            if (x instanceof Integer && y instanceof Integer) {
                return (T) (Integer) ((Integer)x + (Integer)y);
            } else if (x instanceof Double && y instanceof Double) {
                return (T) (Double) ((Double)x + (Double)y);
            } else if (x instanceof String && y instanceof String) {
                return (T) ((String)x + (String)y);
            } else
                return (T)null;
        }
 //   
        // The type here is not the same as the one for the class
        // so we have renamed it from <T> to <N> to make it clearer.
        public static<N extends Number> N add3(N x, N y) {
            if (x instanceof Integer && y instanceof Integer) {
                return (N) (Integer) ((Integer)x + (Integer)y);
            } else if (x instanceof Double && y instanceof Double) {
                return (N) (Double) ((Double)x + (Double)y);
            } else
                return (N)null;
        }
    }
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