Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to copy an image file to local storage and resize it (for the purpose of displaying it in a live tile). I'm primarily just tinkering here, this being my first Windows Store app and all. So far this is what I have:

var fileStream = null;
currentPhoto.copyAsync(Windows.Storage.ApplicationData.current.localFolder, currentPhoto.name)
    .then(function (file) {
        return file.openAsync(Windows.Storage.FileAccessMode.readWrite);
    })
    .then(function (stream) {
        return Windows.Graphics.Imaging.BitmapDecoder.createAsync(stream);
    })
    .then(function (decoder) {
        fileStream = new Windows.Storage.Streams.InMemoryRandomAccessStream();
        return Windows.Graphics.Imaging.BitmapEncoder.createForTranscodingAsync(fileStream, decoder);
    })
    .then(function (encoder) {
        encoder.bitmapTransform.scaledWidth = 100;
        encoder.bitmapTransform.scaledHeight = 100;
        return encoder.flushAsync();
    })
    .then(function () {
        fileStream.close();
    })
    .done(function () {
        // do tile update
    });

I'll calculate a proper aspect ratio after I get this part working, for now 100x100 is fine for testing. I notice when debugging that the encoder is properly detecting that it's a JPG file. However, if I interject into the function chain a call to read the file that's been saved to local storage then I see that it hasn't been resized. So, naturally, the live tile update ignores it because it's too big.

Did I miss a step in my attempt to resize the image? Or perhaps there's an easier way to accomplish this?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The above code should resize the image as expected. But you're not resizing the image in the local storage. You're just copying the original image to local storage, opening it from there and then resizing the image in an in-memory stream which of course you can't see without modifying the code.

With a minor modification to your code you can save the resized image to local storage if that's what you're after:

var decoder = null;
var fileStream = null;
filePicker.pickSingleFileAsync()
    .then(function(file) {
        return file.openAsync(Windows.Storage.FileAccessMode.readWrite);
    })
    .then(function(stream) {
        return Windows.Graphics.Imaging.BitmapDecoder.createAsync(stream);
    })
    .then(function(dec) {
        decoder = dec;
        return Windows.Storage.ApplicationData.current.localFolder.createFileAsync("out.jpg");
    })
    .then(function(file) {
        return file.openAsync(Windows.Storage.FileAccessMode.readWrite);
    })
    .then(function (stream) {
        fileStream = stream;
        return Windows.Graphics.Imaging.BitmapEncoder.createForTranscodingAsync(stream, decoder);
    })
    .then(function(encoder) {
        encoder.bitmapTransform.scaledWidth = 100;
        encoder.bitmapTransform.scaledHeight = 100;
        return encoder.flushAsync();
    })
    .then(function() {
        fileStream.close();
    });

If you try it out, you'll see resized out.jpg created in local storage.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.