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I have a couple of JavaScript functions that I would like to reuse on multiple different pages, so I created an external .js file for the functions. I was wondering if it was possible to change the global variables of that javascript without changing the actual .js file. Here's an example of what I mean:

Suppose I have this tag for my external JavaScript:

<script src="myscripts.js"></script>

Could I somehow define the global variables for the scripts in the <script> tag like so?

<script src="myscripts.js">
    sampleglobalvariable = "somevalue";
    sampleglobalvariable2 = "somevalue2";
</script>

Or like so?

<script src="myscripts.js"></script>
<script>
    sampleglobalvariable = "somevalue";
    sampleglobalvariable2 = "somevalue2";
</script>

Or would I have to define them inside the actual myscripts.js file?

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1  
You can do this in theory. However, it's a pretty bad idea. –  cdhowie Dec 26 '12 at 21:32
2  
No you can't do that, not even in theory (if there was such a thing). You need two <script> tags there, one with the src and one with contents –  Popnoodles Dec 26 '12 at 21:32
    
<script src="myscripts.js?sampleglobal=somevalue"></script> should work too –  kkkkk Dec 26 '12 at 21:34
    
Wait, so I can do it if I use two <script> tags? I'm fine with that. –  Shrey Gupta Dec 26 '12 at 21:34
1  
You may want to use RequireJS to handle dependencies instead of relying on problematic global variables. –  elclanrs Dec 26 '12 at 21:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do this:

<script>
    var sampleglobalvariable = "somevalue";
    var sampleglobalvariable2 = "somevalue2";
</script>

<script src="myscripts.js"></script>

myscripts.js will have access to the global variables defined before.

Alternatively you can turn myscripts.js into a server-side script (written in PHP for example). That would let you pass parameters like this:

<script src="myscripts.js?foo=1&bar=2"></script>

The server-side script would then have to read $_GET['foo'] and $_GET['bar'] and echo custom generated javascript back:

echo 'var sampleglobalvariable = ' . json_encode($_GET['foo']) . ';';
echo 'var sampleglobalvariable2 = ' . json_encode($_GET['bar']) . ';';
echo 'alert(sampleglobalvariable);  // rest of the script, etc';
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To do the latter the server would need to know that .js would have to be parsed as php, and really you should show an example of the php file if you're going to suggest it. Someone who doesn't understand might just try myscripts.js?foo=1&bar=2 and struggle wondering why it doesn't work. –  Popnoodles Dec 26 '12 at 21:40

You should seriously consider changing your script to allow creation of context objects that you can use to call library functions; this will remove your dependency on global variables (which should be avoided) while also allowing two different contexts to be used on the same page. For example, if you have this right now:

var sampleGlobalVariable = 'default1';
var sampleGlobalVariable2 = 'default2';

function foo() {
    alert(sampleGlobalVariable);
}

Consider doing this instead:

// Rename this function to something specific to your script, to
// prevent possible name clashes.
function createScriptContext(sampleGlobalVariable, sampleGlobalVariable2) {
    if (sampleGlobalVariable === undefined) {
        sampleGlobalVariable = 'default1';
    }
    if (sampleGlobalVariable2 === undefined) {
        sampleGlobalVariable2 = 'default2';
    }

    var that = {};

    that.foo = function () {
        alert(sampleGlobalVariable);
    };
}

Then you could use this function from your page to create the context that will be used by other scripts:

<script type="text/javascript">
    var pageGlobalContext = createScriptContext('value1', 'value2');

    // ... later ...

    pageGlobalContext.foo();

    // ... or use default values ...

    var defaultPageGlobalContext = createScriptContext(undefined, undefined);
</script>

A more robust solution would take an object as an argument to the context creation function and initialize the variables from its properties; this will make your settings bound by name instead of by position, as well as making them all syntactically optional.

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You can't use src and have contents.

<script>
    sampleglobalvariable = "somevalue";
    sampleglobalvariable2 = "somevalue2";
</script>
<script src="myscripts.js"></script>
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