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I am trying to grep a log file for entries within the last 24 hours. I came up with the following command:

grep "$(date +%F\ '%k')"\|"$(date +%F --date='yesterday')\ [$(date +%k)-23]" /path/to/log/file

I know regular expressions can be used in grep, but am not very familiar with regex. You see I am greping for anything from today or anything from yesterday between the current hour or higher. This isnt working and I am guessing due to the way I am trying to pass a command as a variable in the regex of grep. I also wouldnt be opposed to using awk with awk I came up with the following but it is not checking the variables properly:

t=$(date +%F) | y=$(date +%F --date='yesterday') | hr=$(date +%k) | awk '{ if ($1=$t || $1=$y && $2>=$hr) { print $0 }}' /path/to/log/file

I would assume systime could be used with awk rather than settings variables but i am not familiar with systime at all. Any suggestions with either command would be greatly appreciated! Oh and here's the log formatting:

2012-12-26 16:33:16 SMTP connection from [127.0.0.1]:46864 (TCP/IP connection count = 1)
2012-12-26 16:33:16 SMTP connection from (localhost) [127.0.0.1]:46864 closed by QUIT
2012-12-26 16:38:19 SMTP connection from [127.0.0.1]:48451 (TCP/IP connection count = 1)
2012-12-26 16:38:21 SMTP connection from [127.0.0.1]:48451 closed by QUIT
2012-12-26 16:38:21 SMTP connection from [127.0.0.1]:48860 (TCP/IP connection count = 1)
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Can we see your log file? Pretty please? –  Justin Lewis Dec 26 '12 at 22:06
    
Here are the first few lines of the log: 2012-12-26 16:33:16 SMTP connection from [127.0.0.1]:46864 (TCP/IP connection count = 1) 2012-12-26 16:33:16 SMTP connection from (localhost) [127.0.0.1]:46864 closed by QUIT 2012-12-26 16:38:19 SMTP connection from [127.0.0.1]:48451 (TCP/IP connection count = 1) 2012-12-26 16:38:21 SMTP connection from [127.0.0.1]:48451 closed by QUIT 2012-12-26 16:38:21 SMTP connection from [127.0.0.1]:48860 (TCP/IP connection count = 1) –  mr.pribesh Dec 26 '12 at 22:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's one way using GNU awk. Run like:

awk -f script.awk file

Contents of script.awk:

BEGIN {
    time = systime()
}

{ 
    spec = $1 " " $2
    gsub(/[-:]/, " ", spec)
}

time - mktime(spec) < 86400

Alternatively, here's the one-liner:

awk 'BEGIN { t = systime() } { s = $1 " " $2; gsub(/[-:]/, " ", s) } t - mktime(s) < 86400' file

Also, the correct way to pass shell vars to awk is to use the -v flag. I've made a few adjustments to your awk command to show you what I mean, but I recommend against doing this:

awk -v t="$(date +%F)" -v y="$(date +%F --date='yesterday')" -v hr="$(date +%k)" '$1==t || $1==y && $2>=hr' file

Explanation:

So before awk starts processing the file, the BEGIN block is processed first. In this block we create a variable called time / t and this is set using the systime() function. systime() simply returns the current time as the number of seconds since the system epoch. Then, for every line in your log file, awk will create another variable called spec / s and this is set to the first and second fields seperated by a single space. Additionally, other characters like - and : need to be globally substituted with spaces for the mktime() function to work correctly and this done using gsub(). Then it's just a little mathematics to test if the datetime in the log file is within the last 24 hours (or exactly 86400 seconds). If the test is true, the line will be printed. Maybe a little extra reading would help, see Time Functions and String Manipulation Functions. HTH.

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Steve, thank you so much you are a life saver. This works perfectly. Would you mind explaining how the one-liner is working? it looks like you are setting the t variable with the current time, and Im am not so sure what the second string is doing and then the third seems to be just saying match match everything within the last day. Can you confirm or deny this and explain the middle part there please it would be greatly appreciatexd –  mr.pribesh Dec 27 '12 at 0:16
    
@mr.pribesh: You are correct - the t variable is being set to the current time and the last expression is a test to see if the datetime has occurred with the last 24 hrs. The 'middle bit' is just formatting the variable spec / s to make it into a string that mktime() can understand (i.e. the format must be strictly: "YYYY MM DD HH MM SS"). Please see the entry for mktime() in the link above - it should clear things up hopefully. HTH. –  Steve Dec 27 '12 at 0:49
    
Steve, again thank you very much. I wish man documentation was this clear. I really appreciate your time and help! –  mr.pribesh Dec 27 '12 at 15:46

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