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I have a frustrating problem with inputting huge amount of numbers into an array using std::cin (although I don't care whether it's cin or something else). I have to store, say, up to a million integers into an integer array, and have come to a solution which, for some reason, only works for the 842-843 first inputs.

My code at the moment:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{

    size_t array_size;
    size_t sum;

    std::cin >> array_size; //let's say array_size = 10000

    int* _nums = new int[array_size];

    for(int i = 0; i < (int)array_size; i++)
    {
        //everything goes fine if I put something like 500 as the array_size
        std::cin >> _nums[i];
    }

    return 0;

}

Thanks for your help!

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7  
"I have a frustrating problem" is absolutely meaningless if you don't tell us what the problem is you're having. "My code doesn't work" and a chunk of code is not an answerable question here. Please edit your question and provide information about the problem; we can't read your mind. –  Ken White Dec 27 '12 at 0:30
2  
size_t is unsigned. You may be losing percision due to the cast. Have you tried making i be of size_t? –  StoryTeller Dec 27 '12 at 0:35
3  
Well, I just ran your code on my machine, and it happily read 10 million random numbers written by another program I have. I didn't check that all the input was working. But it suggests that there's something other than your code that is wrong - for example, the input may be bad? –  Mats Petersson Dec 27 '12 at 0:36
6  
Is there some reason you can't use something like: std::vector<int> nums((std::istream_iterator<int>(std::cin)), std::istream_iterator<int>()); and be done with it? –  Jerry Coffin Dec 27 '12 at 0:40
3  
Any chance you're slamming your console input buffer size up against a wall ? try it with a console loaded with just the digit 1 and a space and see if you get significantly more entries in your list. –  WhozCraig Dec 27 '12 at 0:40

1 Answer 1

As a first step, add error checking, i.e. replace your current code

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    size_t array_size;
    size_t sum;

    std::cin >> array_size; //let's say array_size = 10000

    int* _nums = new int[array_size];

    for(int i = 0; i < (int)array_size; i++)
    {
        //everything goes fine if I put something like 500 as the array_size
        std::cin >> _nums[i];
    }
    return 0;
}

with e.g.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>        // std::vector
#include <stdexcept>     // std::runtime_error, std::exception
#include <stdlib.h>      // EXIT_FAILURE, EXIT_SUCCESS
#include <string>        // std::string

bool throwX( std::string const& s ) { throw std::runtime_error( s ); }

void cppMain()
{
    int array_size;

    std::cin >> array_size; //let's say array_size = 10000

    std::vector<int> nums( array_size );

    for( int i = 0; i < array_size; ++i )
    {
        //everything goes fine if I put something like 500 as the array_size
        std::cin >> _nums[i]
            || throwX( "Oops, input failed!" );
    }
}

int main()
{
    try
    {
        cppMain();
        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
    }
    catch( std::exception const& x )
    {
        cerr << "!" << x.what() << endl;
    }
    return EXIT_FAILURE;
}

Disclaimer: off-the-cuff code, may need fix of typos.

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