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Making a game... More efficient to do this?

if (37 in keysDown) { //left arrow
    if (sprite.state != 'left') sprite.state = 'left';
}

or this?

if (37 in keysDown) { //left arrow
    sprite.state = 'left';
}

This is being called in my game's update function (constantly, as fast as possible).

Sidenote: here is my input key checking code.

//input
var keysDown = {};
window.addEventListener('keydown', function(e) {
    keysDown[e.keyCode] = true;
});
window.addEventListener('keyup', function(e) {
    delete keysDown[e.keyCode];
});
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2  
keydown and keyup will trigger events, use those triggers –  Popnoodles Dec 27 '12 at 0:43
1  
@popnoodles: I assume he wants it to trigger as long as the key is held down, in a game's loop; not once, and not on autorepeat. –  Amadan Dec 27 '12 at 0:44
1  
I doubt that this is generally answerable, since this may (and will) be different for different JS runtimes. –  Lucero Dec 27 '12 at 0:49
3  
Thanks all. popnoodles' comment is the most useful to my case, as I am using keydown and keyup events to add/delete keys from an array. simply setting sprite.state on these events will be the best way to do this. –  Sam Dec 27 '12 at 1:08
1  
@Thilo, that depends how expensive a write operation is behind the scenes. Reads have less impact on caches etc.). Also, this depends on the ratio of reads and writes, e.g. how often would the condition end up as true? –  Lucero Dec 27 '12 at 1:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

"We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: Premature optimization is the root of all evil."

http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?PrematureOptimization

Those two ways share the same complexity, setting\changing a four chars variable won't be the bottle-neck in your app.

The only things I'm concerned here is the readability of your code, if either way you want sprite.state to have the value left why do you need to check what was the previous value?
(ohh, and it saves like 20 bits of bandwidth which is just like the performance gain here...)

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2  
What does the complexity matter? One O(1) can still be a lot slower than another O(1). –  Thilo Dec 27 '12 at 0:53
3  
Comeone - the only valid answer here "relax, it doesn't matter" –  zerkms Dec 27 '12 at 0:54
    
@Thilo, O(1) +2 == O(1) +3 to me(and math...) –  gdoron Dec 27 '12 at 0:55
    
@zerkms, my point exactly! –  gdoron Dec 27 '12 at 0:55
2  
@gdoron I wasn't trying to take away the shout, just the ear bleed (the clots are counter productive) :) –  user166390 Dec 27 '12 at 1:03

The latter should be faster.

The former will have to test for string equality, which is O(N) (dependent on string length). Assignment operation only writes one pointer.

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1  
do you know how strings are implemented for sure? In several programming languages (say C#) strings are compared by references (because each string object is allocated in a heap, so you always have the same immutable object). –  zerkms Dec 27 '12 at 0:48
3  
Speaking about O(N) when the N is known to be four chars is ridicules and incorrect! –  gdoron Dec 27 '12 at 0:48
1  
Correct answer (the first sentence), but I still want to downvote :-( Please delete that O(N) nonsense. –  Thilo Dec 27 '12 at 0:50
3  
What does it matter how fast the string comparison is depending on string length? All it matters is if the retrieval + comparison is faster or slower than the assignment (and I think it can only be slower). –  Thilo Dec 27 '12 at 0:59
2  
Any way, I fully endorse @gdoron's answer - at the level we're talking about, the speed difference should be minimal, and readability should be a bigger concern. –  Amadan Dec 27 '12 at 1:11

Wouldn't something like this be a lot faster than looping through the keys? You can continuously check a variable very quickly.

var keyleft=false;

window.onkeydown = keydown;
window.onkeyup = keyup;

function keydown(event)
{
    var keyCode = ('which' in event) ? event.which : event.keyCode;
    if (keyCode==37) keyleft=true;
}

function keyup(event)
{
    var keyCode = ('which' in event) ? event.which : event.keyCode;
    if (keyCode==37) keyleft=false;
}

No guarantees this code will work, I've forgotten how to do things without jQuery

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2  
He is not looping through keys. He is storing currently pressed keys in a hash (insert at keydown, remove at keyup), so he can test for any key at any time if it is down or not. The loop is the game loop (animation speed), not the key loop. –  Amadan Dec 27 '12 at 1:06
    
Oh is that what he means by (37 in keysDown) –  Popnoodles Dec 27 '12 at 1:17
    
popnoodles, he's not: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/… I knew this, but in my comment had a brainfart and referenced the wrong thing. This use of in is correct and not indicative of a loop in the if. –  Jared Farrish Dec 27 '12 at 1:17
    
It's the same as in_array in PHP but for some reason I was under the impression it was checking keys. –  Popnoodles Dec 27 '12 at 1:19

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