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I'm conducting an experiment to see how long it takes the TCP in java. First I start the server. Then call the function client_tcp many times, more than 50000 times. And measure the time it takes to connect, and send and receive 1 byte. When the server get more than 16384 requests (sometimes varies), the client can't connect to the server.

I don't know if it is because of the receive buffer size in the server socket. In my case, ss.getReceiveBufferSize() = 131072.

Here is the code:

public synchronized void server_tcp(int port) {
    ServerSocket ss;
    Socket       so;
    InputStream  is;
    OutputStream os;

    try {           
        ss = new ServerSocket(port);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        System.out.println("Unable to connect to port " + port +
                " TCP socket.");
        return;
    }

    while (true) {
        try {
            so = ss.accept();
            is = so.getInputStream();
            os = so.getOutputStream();
            int ch = is.read();
            os.write(65);
            so.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("Something went wrong.");
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            System.out.println("Bye.");
        }
    }
}

public void client_tcp(String host, int port) {

    Socket       so = null;
    InputStream  is = null;
    OutputStream os = null;

    try {
        so = new Socket(host, port);
    } catch (UnknownHostException e) {
        System.err.println("Error Host not found.");
        return;
    } catch (IOException e) {
        Syste.err.println("Error Creating socket.");
        return;
    }

    try {
        os = so.getOutputStream();
        is = so.getInputStream();

        os.write(65);

        is.read();

        os.close();
        is.close();
        so.close();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        System.err.println("Error.");
        return;
    }
}

What's wrong?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
try running "netstat -a" from a console window it takes time for the system to free up closed sockets. when you connect to the local machine from the local machine you are taking up two sockets the machine has at most 64k and a good proportion of those will be used by other programs. –  BevynQ Dec 27 '12 at 1:32
    
It will be a low level stuff (JVM, native code), not a problem in your code, also not with buff size: you aren't storing the read value into a buff. –  user529543 Dec 27 '12 at 1:34
    
Your test is meaningless. No sanely written client would ever send and receive just one byte and then close the connection. Try testing and measuring things that are really going to happen. @BevynQ You are confusing sockets with ports. –  EJP Dec 27 '12 at 17:23
    
I'm testing the time it takes to create the connection to the server. I'm not testing the time it takes for data sent. –  escrichov Dec 28 '12 at 16:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are creating a massive number of sockets almost at once and the OS is not having time enough to release them. You could add a tiny delay (to be experimentally tuned) to the loop that invokes the client_tcp() method.

for(int i=0; i<50000; i++) {
    new SocketReuse().client_tcp("127.0.0.1", 4444);
    Thread.sleep(2); // 2 milliseconds delay
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried it and it works fine. Thank you very much. –  escrichov Dec 27 '12 at 16:54

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