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I would like to parse a string of French dates using Antlr.

I have three types of date :

  • date_day : 3 Octobre 2004 (the hour/minutes is midnight)
  • date_time : 12h (the day, month and year are completed with the current date)
  • date_complete : 3 Octobre 2004 12h. As you can see date_complete : date_day date_hour

The document I want to parse is just a chain of date_day, date_time and date_complete (with no separator).

Here's an example of the strings I want to parse

3 Octobre 2005 12h 13h 5 Octobre 2004 3 Septembre 2005 11h
Expected : date_complete date_time date_day date_complete

12h
Expected : date_time

3 Octobre 2005 5 Octobre 2004 12h 13h 3 Septembre 2005 11h
Expected : date_day date_complete date_time date_complete

**// NEW REQUIREMENTS**

3 Octobre 2005
Expected : date_day 

3 Octobre 
Expected : date_day 

3 
Expected : date_day 

I tried many things, and Antlr v3 always says that my grammar is ambiguous :

warning(200): /meleo.dates/src/Grammar.g:25:48: 
Decision can match input such as "{FRI, MON..TUE, WED} TWO_DIGITS DECEMBER FOUR_DIGITS {FRI..HOURG, MON..WED}" using multiple alternatives: 1, 2
As a result, alternative(s) 2 were disabled for that input
 |---> date_day (date_day | date_complete | date_hour)+

What is the proper to write that grammar ?

Here's the grammar :

grammar MeleoDates;

options {
  language = Java;
}

@header {
  package meleo.data.dates ; 

  import rainstudios.meleo.crawler.data.Dates ;
  import rainstudios.meleo.crawler.data.EventDate ;
}

@lexer::header {
  package meleo.data.dates ;   

  import rainstudios.meleo.crawler.data.EventDate ;
 }

input           returns [Dates dates] 
                @init {Dates r = new Dates() ; } : 
                (   date 
                    {r.addDay($date.date);}
                    DATE_SEP?)+ 
                EOF
                    {$dates = r ;}
                ;

date            returns [EventDate date] :
                (date_complete)=> date_complete 
                    {$date = $date_complete.date;}
                | date_day 
                    {$date = $date_day.date;}
                | date_time 
                    {$date = $date_time.date;}
                ;

date_complete  returns  [EventDate date]   
                @init   {EventDateBuilder builder = new EventDateBuilder() ; } : 
                 day=date_day 
                    {builder.addDay($day.date);}
                 HOUR_SEP? 
                 time=date_time 
                    {builder.addTime($time.date);}
                    {$date = builder.toDate();}
                ;

date_day        returns [EventDate date] 
                @init   {EventDateBuilder builder = new EventDateBuilder() ; } :
                (
                dayOfWeek=( 
                     MON
                   | TUE
                   | WED
                   | THU
                   | FRI
                   | SAT
                   | SUN
                )?
                (day=INT)=> INT 
                    {builder.addDay($day.text);}
                (   m=ID 
                        {builder.addMonth($m.text);}
                    year=INT ?
                        {builder.addMonth($year.text);}
                )?
                )
                    {$date = builder.toDate();}
                ;

date_time       returns [EventDate date]  
                @init   {EventDateBuilder builder = new EventDateBuilder() ; } :
                    TIME 
                    {builder.addTime($TIME.text);}
                    {$date = builder.toDate();}
                ;

month   : DECEMBER | JANUARY ;

MON 
 : 'lundi'  
 | 'lun' 
 ;

 TUE 
 : 'mardi'  
 | 'mar' 
 ;

 WED 
 : 'mercredi'  
 | 'mer' 
 ;

 THU 
 : 'jeudi'  
 | 'jeu' 
 ;

 FRI 
 : 'venredi'  
 | 'ven' 
 ;

 SAT 
 : 'samedi'  
 | 'sam' 
 ;

 SUN 
 : 'dimanche'  
 | 'dim' 
 ;

DECEMBER    : 'dec' | 'decembre' ;
JANUARY     : 'jan' | 'janvier' ;

DATE_SEP    : 'et'| ',' | '-'; 
HOUR_SEP    : 'à' | 'a' ;
INT         : ('0'..'9')+;
TIME_SEP    : ':'  | 'h' ;
TIME        : INT TIME_SEP INT?;
ID          : ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z')+;

WS : (' ' | '\t' | '\n' | '\r' | '\f')+ {$channel = HIDDEN;};

** edited : added new requirements (optional month and year for date_day) **

share|improve this question
1  
Could you please post your grammar here? –  Xiao Jia Dec 27 '12 at 2:41
    
Now with the grammar, as per @tenterhook suggestion –  Name is carl Dec 27 '12 at 14:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Consider using a syntactic predicate:

input      : date+;
date       : (date_complete) => date_complete
           | date_day
           | date_time
           ;

This, in effect, tells ANTLR to try for a date_complete before trying to match whatever it finds like usual (this is probably not a technically accurate description, but you get the idea). Without this, the date rule can match multiple options with the same input and ANTLR (v3, anyway) can't address that itself.

Here's a full grammar for testing:

grammar AmbiguousDates;


input           : date+ EOF;

date            : (date_complete)=> date_complete 
                    {System.out.println("date_complete: " + $date_complete.str);}
                | date_day 
                    {System.out.println("date_day: " + $date_day.str);}
                | date_time 
                    {System.out.println("date_time: " + $date_time.str);}
                ;

date_complete   returns [String str]
                : date_day date_time 
                    {$str = String.format("\%s \%s", $date_day.str, $date_time.str);}
                ;

date_day        returns [String str]
                : day=INT ID year=INT 
                    {$str = String.format("\%s \%s \%s", $day.text, $ID.text, $year.text);}
                ;

date_time       returns [String str]
                : TIME 
                    {$str = $TIME.text;}
                ;

INT     : ('0'..'9')+;
TIME    : INT 'h';
ID      : ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z')+;
WS      : (' '|'\t'|'\f'|'\r'|'\n')+ {skip();};

Input

3 Octobre 2005 12h 13h 5 Octobre 2004 3 Septembre 2005 11h

Output

date_complete: 3 Octobre 2005 12h
date_time: 13h
date_day: 5 Octobre 2004
date_complete: 3 Septembre 2005 11h
share|improve this answer
    
Now, I would like to make the month and year optional. date_day returns [String str] : day=INT ID? year=INT? But I got the dreaded ambiguous grammar again. Any idea ? –  Name is carl Dec 27 '12 at 14:34
1  
@Nameiscarl date_day can't tell if INT INT means "date_day=day year" or "date_day=day date_day=day". Try making lexer rules like DAY that matches one or two numbers and YEAR which matches four numbers, then change date_day to DAY ID? YEAR? If you run into problems, it might be easier to start a new question. –  user1201210 Dec 27 '12 at 18:17

I don't think you gain anything by using ANTLR. You can instead use SimpleDateFormat#parse along with some additional work to check for a trailing hour (i.e. "h") marker to accomplish your goal as follows:

package question;

import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.ParsePosition;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Locale;

public class FrenchDateParser {
    private static SimpleDateFormat date_complete = new SimpleDateFormat("d MMMM yyyy h", Locale.FRENCH);

    private static SimpleDateFormat date_day = new SimpleDateFormat("d MMMM yyyy", Locale.FRENCH);

    private static SimpleDateFormat date_time = new SimpleDateFormat("h", Locale.FRENCH);

    private static String parse(String input) {
        ParsePosition parsePosition = new ParsePosition(0);
        StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
        int inputSize = input.length();
        while (parsePosition.getIndex() < inputSize) {
            int startingParsePositionIndex = parsePosition.getIndex();

            if (date_complete.parse(input, parsePosition) != null) {
                if (input.charAt(parsePosition.getIndex()) == 'h') {
                    stringBuilder.append("date_complete ");
                    parsePosition.setIndex(parsePosition.getIndex() + 1);
                    continue;
                }
                parsePosition.setIndex(startingParsePositionIndex);
            }

            if (date_day.parse(input, parsePosition) != null) {
                stringBuilder.append("date_day ");
                continue;
            }

            if (date_time.parse(input, parsePosition) != null) {
                if (input.charAt(parsePosition.getIndex()) == 'h') {
                    stringBuilder.append("date_time ");
                    parsePosition.setIndex(parsePosition.getIndex() + 1);
                    continue;
                }
                parsePosition.setIndex(startingParsePositionIndex);
            }

            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Unable to parse input [" + input + "]");
        }
        return stringBuilder.toString().trim();
    }

    public static void main(String... args) throws ParseException {
        String[] inputs = {"3 Octobre 2005 12h 13h 5 Octobre 2004 3 Septembre 2005 11h", "12h",
                "3 Octobre 2005 5 Octobre 2004 12h 13h 3 Septembre 2005 11h"};

        String[] expecteds = {"date_complete date_time date_day date_complete", "date_time",
                "date_day date_complete date_time date_complete"};

        for (int i = 0; i < inputs.length; i++) {
            String actual = parse(inputs[i]);
            System.out.println(expecteds[i].equals(actual));
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I simplified date_day and date_time for the sake of the question. –  Name is carl Dec 27 '12 at 7:41
    
Using ANTLR still does not ensure valid dates - for instance dealing with leap years - and does produce values with the defaults you want (e.g. "date_day" the hour/minutes is midnight). –  orangepips Dec 27 '12 at 14:12
    
Indeed, the validation is done in other part of the code. –  Name is carl Dec 27 '12 at 14:27
    
So given that, still not seeing what ANTLR gives you over Java's built in parser. Using Java's built in date parser does both for you - parsing and validation. –  orangepips Dec 27 '12 at 14:29
    
The next step is to add interval : "from 12h30 to 15h45" and many other things, like parsing a dash of natural languages "midnight, noon, tomorrow". A proper parser looked the way to go. –  Name is carl Dec 27 '12 at 15:01

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