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I am relatively new to the R programming language. I have a dataframe (titled "DFA") with numerous lists of timeseries data headed "TS1", TS2", TS3", etc upto "TS1000". I require to add these as lines to an existing XY graph and wish to automate the addition of these timeseries by using a simple loop function. I have used the following simple code:

for (i in 1:1000) { 
    lines(DFA$year, DFA$ts[i], lty=1, col="grey", lwd=1) 
}

Unfortunately this produced nothing? When I added the lines 1 by 1 longhand (ie. without the loop), it works fine. Can anyone help point out failure of the loop to help me automate the process? Many thanks. Phil

Further to the above-mentioned initial post, a portion of the DFA dataframe looks like the following (each time-series has 157 points and there are 1000 time-series):

    ts1 ts2 ts3 ts4
1   6871    6855    6843    6870
2   6872    6858    6848    6872
3   6873    6861    6854    6874
4   6874    6865    6859    6877
5   6876    6868    6864    6879
6   6877    6871    6869    6881
7   6879    6875    6874    6883
8   6880    6878    6879    6886
9   6882    6881    6884    6888
10  6883    6884    6889    6890
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4  
may I suggest you provide a minimal working example (we don't know what DFA is or what it looks like). Maybe provide a small data set of 10 rows or simulate. And also provide a sample of what the output should look like. –  Tyler Rinker Dec 27 '12 at 2:22
    
Did you initiate plot() first? Do the lines fall w/i the plotting region? –  gung Dec 27 '12 at 2:40
    
In response to the question from Gung, the plot() function was called first and all lines fit within the plotting region. I can add the lines to the plot manually, but, unfortunately the loop routine did not work? –  Phil W Dec 27 '12 at 3:38
1  
you can't index variable DFA$ts1 using DFA$ts[1]. You need something like DFA[[paste0("ts",i)]] or DFA[,i+1] (assuming that year is the first column and the other columns are all time series. See ?matplot, ?matlines too ... –  Ben Bolker Dec 27 '12 at 3:55
    
Hi all,Thank-you for your assitance, I have actually worked it out in the interim by using the following script: for (i in 1:1000) { lines(DFA$year, DFA[,i], lty=1, col="grey", lwd=1) } –  Phil W Dec 27 '12 at 4:20

1 Answer 1

A loop is not necessary here, if I understand your end goal. Instead, you can transform your dataset into an actual time-series dataset and plot the resulting data.

Here's the sample data you supplied:

temp <- read.table(header = TRUE, text = "    ts1 ts2 ts3 ts4
1   6871    6855    6843    6870
2   6872    6858    6848    6872
3   6873    6861    6854    6874
4   6874    6865    6859    6877
5   6876    6868    6864    6879
6   6877    6871    6869    6881
7   6879    6875    6874    6883
8   6880    6878    6879    6886
9   6882    6881    6884    6888
10  6883    6884    6889    6890")

We'll imagine this data spans 1990 to 1999 and is yearly data.

temp.ts <- ts(temp, start = 1990, end = 1999, frequency = 1)
plot(temp.ts, plot.type = "single")

The result:

enter image description here

I would think this is the most efficient way to approach this.

Another approach is to add in a variable for "year" and reshape your data from wide to long (but I'm not sure how that would work with 1000 time series variables). The basic approach would be something like:

temp$year <- seq(1990, length.out=10)
temp1 <- reshape(temp, direction = "long", idvar="year", 
                 varying=names(temp)[grepl("ts", names(temp))], sep ="")
plot(temp1$year, temp1$ts, type = "l")

There are other approaches (in particular using lapply, which will go through your data.frame by columns) that you might find useful.

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