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I have a data frame with 3 columns: custId, saleDate, DelivDateTime.

> head(events22)
     custId            saleDate      DelivDate
1 280356593 2012-11-14 14:04:59 11/14/12 17:29
2 280367076 2012-11-14 17:04:44 11/14/12 20:48
3 280380097 2012-11-14 17:38:34 11/14/12 20:45
4 280380095 2012-11-14 20:45:44 11/14/12 23:59
5 280380095 2012-11-14 20:31:39 11/14/12 23:49
6 280380095 2012-11-14 19:58:32 11/15/12 00:10

Here's the dput:

> dput(events22)
structure(list(custId = c(280356593L, 280367076L, 280380097L, 
280380095L, 280380095L, 280380095L, 280364279L, 280364279L, 280398506L, 
280336395L, 280364376L, 280368458L, 280368458L, 280368456L, 280368456L, 
280364225L, 280391721L, 280353458L, 280387607L, 280387607L), 
    saleDate = structure(c(1352901899.215, 1352912684.484, 1352914714.971, 
    1352925944.429, 1352925099.247, 1352923112.636, 1352922476.55, 
    1352920666.968, 1352915226.534, 1352911135.077, 1352921349.592, 
    1352911494.975, 1352910529.86, 1352924755.295, 1352907511.476, 
    1352920108.577, 1352906160.883, 1352905925.134, 1352916810.309, 
    1352916025.673), class = c("POSIXct", "POSIXt"), tzone = "UTC"), 
    DelivDate = c("11/14/12 17:29", "11/14/12 20:48", "11/14/12 20:45", 
    "11/14/12 23:59", "11/14/12 23:49", "11/15/12 00:10", "11/14/12 23:35", 
    "11/14/12 22:59", "11/14/12 20:53", "11/14/12 19:52", "11/14/12 23:01", 
    "11/14/12 19:47", "11/14/12 19:42", "11/14/12 23:31", "11/14/12 23:33", 
    "11/14/12 22:45", "11/14/12 18:11", "11/14/12 18:12", "11/14/12 19:17", 
    "11/14/12 19:19")), .Names = c("custId", "saleDate", "DelivDate"
), row.names = c("1", "2", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8", "9", 
"10", "11", "12", "13", "14", "15", "16", "17", "18", "19", "20"
), class = "data.frame")

I'm trying to find the DelivDate for the most recent saleDate for each custId.

I can do that using plyr::ddply like this:

dd1 <-ddply(events22, .(custId),.inform = T, function(x){
x[x$saleDate == max(x$saleDate),"DelivDate"]
})

My question is whether there is a faster way to do this as the ddply method is a bit time consuming (the full data set is ~ 400k lines). I've looked at using aggregate() but don't know how to get a value other than the one I'm sorting by.

Any suggestions?

EDIT:

Here's the benchmark results for 10k lines @ 10 iterations:

      test replications elapsed relative user.self
2   AGG2()           10    5.96    1.000      5.93
1   AGG1()           10   20.87    3.502     20.75
5 DATATABLE()        10   61.32        1     60.31
3  DDPLY()           10   80.04   13.430     79.63
4 DOCALL()           10   90.43   15.173     88.39

EDIT2 : While being quickest AGG2() doesn't give the correct answer.

    > head(agg2)
     custId            saleDate      DelivDate
1 280336395 2012-11-14 16:38:55 11/14/12 19:52
2 280353458 2012-11-14 15:12:05 11/14/12 18:12
3 280356593 2012-11-14 14:04:59 11/14/12 17:29
4 280364225 2012-11-14 19:08:28 11/14/12 22:45
5 280364279 2012-11-14 19:47:56 11/14/12 23:35
6 280364376 2012-11-14 19:29:09 11/14/12 23:01
> agg2 <- AGG2()
> head(agg2)
     custId      DelivDate
1 280336395 11/14/12 17:29
2 280353458 11/14/12 17:29
3 280356593 11/14/12 17:29
4 280364225 11/14/12 17:29
5 280364279 11/14/12 17:29
6 280364376 11/14/12 17:29
> agg2 <- DDPLY()
> head(agg2)
     custId             V1
1 280336395 11/14/12 19:52
2 280353458 11/14/12 18:12
3 280356593 11/14/12 17:29
4 280364225 11/14/12 22:45
5 280364279 11/14/12 23:35
6 280364376 11/14/12 23:01
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I, too, would recommend data.table here, but since you asked for an aggregate solution, here is one which combines aggregate and merge to get all the columns:

merge(events22, aggregate(saleDate ~ custId, events22, max))

Or just aggregate if you only want the "custId" and "DelivDate" columns:

aggregate(list(DelivDate = events22$saleDate), 
          list(custId = events22$custId),
          function(x) events22[["DelivDate"]][which.max(x)])

Finally, here's an option using sqldf:

library(sqldf)
sqldf("select custId, DelivDate, max(saleDate) `saleDate` 
      from events22 group by custId")

Benchmarks

I'm not a benchmarking or data.table expert, but it surprised me that data.table is not faster here. My suspicion is that the results would be quite different on a larger dataset, say for instance, your 400k lines one. Anyway, here's some benchmarking code modeled after @mnel's answer here so you can do some tests on your actual dataset for future reference.

library(rbenchmark)

First, set up your functions for what you want to benchmark.

DDPLY <- function() { 
  x <- ddply(events22, .(custId), .inform = T, 
             function(x) {
               x[x$saleDate == max(x$saleDate),"DelivDate"]}) 
}
DATATABLE <- function() { x <- dt[, .SD[which.max(saleDate), ], by = custId] }
AGG1 <- function() { 
  x <- merge(events22, aggregate(saleDate ~ custId, events22, max)) }
AGG2 <- function() { 
  x <- aggregate(list(DelivDate = events22$saleDate), 
                 list(custId = events22$custId),
                 function(x) events22[["DelivDate"]][which.max(x)]) }
SQLDF <- function() { 
  x <- sqldf("select custId, DelivDate, max(saleDate) `saleDate` 
             from events22 group by custId") }
DOCALL <- function() {
  do.call(rbind, 
          lapply(split(events22, events22$custId), function(x){
            x[which.max(x$saleDate), ]
          })
  )
}

Second, do the benchmarking.

benchmark(DDPLY(), DATATABLE(), AGG1(), AGG2(), SQLDF(), DOCALL(), 
          order = "elapsed")[1:5]
#          test replications elapsed relative user.self
# 4      AGG2()          100   0.285    1.000     0.284
# 3      AGG1()          100   0.891    3.126     0.896
# 6    DOCALL()          100   1.202    4.218     1.204
# 2 DATATABLE()          100   1.251    4.389     1.248
# 1     DDPLY()          100   1.254    4.400     1.252
# 5     SQLDF()          100   2.109    7.400     2.108
share|improve this answer
    
AGG2 may be fast because you're not returning all columns. –  Tyler Rinker Dec 27 '12 at 5:11
    
@TylerRinker, neither does ddply from the OPs current method. –  Ananda Mahto Dec 27 '12 at 5:37
1  
Yes, in that linked question @mnel was showing how not to benchmark and explained why setting replications to 100 on a small dataset results in significant differences of insignificant times. The task being timed here takes between 0.00285 and 0.021 seconds. If that matters then the task should probably be coded in a compiled language. Also, dt[, .SD[which.max(saleDate), ], by = custId] is not the fastest way of doing that in data.table but we hope to optimize it in future to turn that into the fastest way automatically, since it is the most natural. –  Matt Dowle Dec 27 '12 at 10:58
1  
@AnandaMahto If you create some random data for the benchmark (e.g. using rnorm and sample) you can easily play with variables like: the unique number of levels of a factor, the total size of the dataset etc. –  Paul Hiemstra Dec 27 '12 at 12:01
1  
@AnandaMahto: AGG2 is fastest but doesn't seem to be returning the correct values. See above EDIT2. –  screechOwl Dec 27 '12 at 14:39

Here's a much faster data.table function:

DATATABLE <- function() { 
  dt <- data.table(events, key=c('custId', 'saleDate'))
  dt[, maxrow := 1:.N==.N, by = custId]
  return(dt[maxrow==TRUE, list(custId, DelivDate)])
}

Note that this function creates a data.table and sorts the data, which is a step you'd only need to perform once. If you remove this step (perhaps you have a multi-step data processing pipeline, and create the data.table once, as a first step), the function is more than twice as fast.

I also modified all the previous functions to return the result, for easier comparison:

DDPLY <- function() { 
  return(ddply(events, .(custId), .inform = T, 
               function(x) {
                 x[x$saleDate == max(x$saleDate),"DelivDate"]}))
}
AGG1 <- function() { 
  return(merge(events, aggregate(saleDate ~ custId, events, max)))}

SQLDF <- function() { 
  return(sqldf("select custId, DelivDate, max(saleDate) `saleDate` 
             from events group by custId"))}
DOCALL <- function() {
  return(do.call(rbind, 
                 lapply(split(events, events$custId), function(x){
                   x[which.max(x$saleDate), ]
                 })
  ))
}

Here's the results for 10k rows, repeated 10 times:

library(rbenchmark)
library(plyr)
library(data.table)
library(sqldf)
events <- do.call(rbind, lapply(1:500, function(x) events22))
events$custId <- sample(1:nrow(events), nrow(events))

benchmark(a <- DDPLY(), b <- DATATABLE(), c <- AGG1(), d <- SQLDF(),
 e <- DOCALL(), order = "elapsed", replications=10)[1:5]

              test replications elapsed relative user.self
2 b <- DATATABLE()           10    0.13    1.000      0.13
4     d <- SQLDF()           10    0.42    3.231      0.41
3      c <- AGG1()           10   12.11   93.154     12.03
1     a <- DDPLY()           10   32.17  247.462     32.01
5    e <- DOCALL()           10   56.05  431.154     55.85

Since all the functions return their results, we can verify they all return the same answer:

c <- c[order(c$custId),]
dim(a); dim(b); dim(c); dim(d); dim(e)
all(a$V1==b$DelivDate)
all(a$V1==c$DelivDate)
all(a$V1==d$DelivDate)
all(a$V1==e$DelivDate)

/Edit: On the smaller, 20 row dataset, data.table is still the fastest, but by a thinner margin:

              test replications elapsed relative user.self
2 b <- DATATABLE()          100    0.22    1.000      0.22
3      c <- AGG1()          100    0.42    1.909      0.42
5    e <- DOCALL()          100    0.48    2.182      0.49
1     a <- DDPLY()          100    0.55    2.500      0.55
4     d <- SQLDF()          100    1.00    4.545      0.98

/Edit2: If we remove the data.table creation from the function we get the following results:

dt <- data.table(events, key=c('custId', 'saleDate'))
DATATABLE2 <- function() { 
  dt[, maxrow := 1:.N==.N, by = custId]
  return(dt[maxrow==TRUE, list(custId, DelivDate)])
}
benchmark(a <- DDPLY(), b <- DATATABLE2(), c <- AGG1(), d <- SQLDF(),
           e <- DOCALL(), order = "elapsed", replications=10)[1:5]
              test replications elapsed relative user.self
2 b <- DATATABLE()           10    0.09    1.000      0.08
4     d <- SQLDF()           10    0.41    4.556      0.39
3      c <- AGG1()           10   11.73  130.333     11.67
1     a <- DDPLY()           10   31.59  351.000     31.50
5    e <- DOCALL()           10   55.05  611.667     54.91
share|improve this answer

This should be pretty fast but data.table is likely faster:

do.call(rbind, 
    lapply(split(events22, events22$custId), function(x){
        x[which.max(x$saleDate), ]
    })
)
share|improve this answer

The fastest between ddply and aggregate, I suppose would be aggregate, especially on huge data as you have. However, the fastest would be data.table.

require(data.table)
dt <- data.table(events22)
dt[, .SD[which.max(saleDate),], by=custId]

From ?data.table: .SD is a data.table containing the subset of x's Data for each group, excluding the group column(s).

share|improve this answer
    
Good call on data.table here. –  Ananda Mahto Dec 27 '12 at 4:29

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