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I have a handful of static "shape" classes that I am using in my program, and since each of the static classes needs to perform the same kind of operations, I'm wondering if there's a way to genericize the method call. If the classes weren't static, I'd simply use an interface.

Here's the gist of my situation:

public static Triangle
{

  public int getNumVerts()
  {
    return 3;
  }

  public bool isColliding()
  {
    return Triangle Collision Code Here
  }

}

public static Square
{

  public int getNumVerts()
  {
    return 4;
  }

  public bool isColliding()
  {
    return Square Collision Code Here
  }

}

What I'd prefer to do is simply call Shape.getNumVerts(), instead of my current switch statement:

switch (ShapeType)
{
  case ShapeType.Triangle:
      Triangle.GetNumVerts();
  case ShapeType.Square:
      Square.GetNumVerts();
}

I could simply use polymorphism if I used singletons instead of static classes, but singletons are to be avoided, and I'd need to pass a ton of references around so that I could do processing, as needed, on the individual shapes.

Is there a way to group these static classes, or is the switch statement as good as it's going to get?

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Why are singletons to be avoided? You have a scenario where sinlgetons would solve your problems, why not use them? – SWeko Dec 27 '12 at 7:11
up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's not clear if you need separate Triangle and Square classes. You could eliminate them and have only Shape class with methods accepting ShapeType argument. But it also comes withswitch actually.

public static class Shape
{
    public static int GetNumVerts(ShapeType type)
    {
        switch (type)
        {
            case ShapeType.Triangle:return 3;
            case ShapeType.Square:return 4;
            //...
        }
    }
}

As for switch, I guess it's quite common and normal to use it this way.

Yet you may have separate Triangle and Square classes, and have your switch within Shape.GetNumVerts method. It will let you call Shape.GetNumVerts(ShapeType.Triangle);, i.e. switch is encapsulated within Shape class and used only once there.

public static class Shape
{
    public static int GetNumVerts(ShapeType type)
    {
        switch (type)
        {
            case ShapeType.Triangle:return Triangle.GetNumVerts();
            case ShapeType.Square:return Square.GetNumVerts();
            //...
        }
    }
}
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