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preg_match("/(11|10|12)([*0-9]+)/i", "11*&!@#")

Above is the one i tried.

My requirement is total of 6 characters.

10****   
102***
1023**
10234*
102345

First two characters should be either 10 or 11 or 12 and the rest of the four characters should be like the pattern above.

How can i achieve it?

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3 Answers 3

1[0-2][0-9*]{4}

This should met your requirements:

  • 1 at the begining
  • then 0 or 1 or 2
  • then a digit or *, four times

EDIT

To avoid inputs like 102**5 you can do the pattern more complex:

1[0-2](([*]{4})|([0-9][*]{3})|([0-9]{2}[*]{2})|([0-9]{3}[*])|([0-9]{4}))
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+1 but it would pass 102**5 too. –  Taha Paksu Dec 27 '12 at 7:17
    
@tpaksu: I've edited my answer and add more complex solution to avoid wrong passes like yours –  MarcinJuraszek Dec 27 '12 at 7:25
    
... Why not just remove the *? I don't get it. Can someone give me a real explanation as to why you would use * in square brackets? –  David Harris Dec 27 '12 at 7:27
1  
Because that is the requirement from the question? –  MarcinJuraszek Dec 27 '12 at 7:32
    
Oh. I guess I didn't fully understand the question, I thought OP ONLY wanted a six digit number with 10, 11 or 12 at the start. –  David Harris Dec 27 '12 at 7:33

Like this:

#(10|11|12)([0-9]{4})#

Outputs:

enter image description here

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I think you forgot to add the * in your pattern. –  Taha Paksu Dec 27 '12 at 7:16
    
What does the * denote in brackets? –  David Harris Dec 27 '12 at 7:17
    
Yes, we all wonder what that is, but if it doesn't mean random number, it means character *. –  Taha Paksu Dec 27 '12 at 7:20
    
so wait.... do exactly the opposite of what OP wants then? –  David Harris Dec 27 '12 at 7:20

How about:

^(?=.{6})1[0-2]\d{0,4}\**$

this will match all your examples and not match strings like:

1*2*3*

explanation:

The regular expression:

(?-imsx:^(?=.{6})1[0-2]\d{0,4}\**$)

matches as follows:

NODE                     EXPLANATION
----------------------------------------------------------------------
(?-imsx:                 group, but do not capture (case-sensitive)
                         (with ^ and $ matching normally) (with . not
                         matching \n) (matching whitespace and #
                         normally):
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  ^                        the beginning of the string
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  (?=                      look ahead to see if there is:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    .{6}                     any character except \n (6 times)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of look-ahead
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  1                        '1'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  [0-2]                    any character of: '0' to '2'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \d{0,4}                  digits (0-9) (between 0 and 4 times
                           (matching the most amount possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \**                      '*' (0 or more times (matching the most
                           amount possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  $                        before an optional \n, and the end of the
                           string
----------------------------------------------------------------------
)                        end of grouping
----------------------------------------------------------------------
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