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I have a file file.txt containing a very long line:

1|34|2012.12.01 00:08:35|12|4|921-*203-0000000000-962797807950|mar0101|0|00000106829DAE7F3FAB187550B920530C00|0|0|4000018001000002||962797807950|||||-1|||||-1||-1|0||||0||||||-1|-1|||-1|0|-1|-1|-1|2012.12.01 00:08:35|1|0||-1|1|||||||||||||0|0|||472|0|12|-2147483648|-2147483648|-2147483648|-2147483648|||||||||||||||||||||||||0|||0||1|6|252|tid{111211344662580792}pfid{10}gob{1}rid{globitel} afid{}uid1{962797807950}aid1{1}ar1{100}uid2{globitel}aid2{-1}pid{1234}pur{!GDRC RESERVE AMOUNT 10000}ratinf{}rec{0}rots{0}tda{}mid{}exd{0}reqa{100}ctr{StaffLine}ftksn{JMT}ftksr{0001}ftktp{PayCall Ticket}||

I want to print only the word after "ctr" in this file, which is "StaffLine", and I don't how many characters there are in this word.

I've tried:

awk '{comp[substr("ctr",0)]{print}}'

but it didn't work. How can I get hold of that word?

share|improve this question
    
You've written "thanks; didn't work" or thereabouts to four answers. That's very odd; all four answers work for me. That suggests there's a problem at your end. What system are you using (you said 'Unix', but that covers a lot of territory)? Which shell are you using? What is the error message when any given answer fails? Did you try the answers on the text copied from the question, or did you try it on the text you copied into the question? We've only got what was copied into the question to work with, of course. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 27 '12 at 15:14

4 Answers 4

Here's one way using awk:

awk -F "[{}]" '{ for(i=1;i<=NF;i++) if ($i == "ctr") print $(i+1) }' file

Or if your version of grep supports Perl-like regex:

grep -oP "(?<=ctr{)[^}]+" file

Results:

StaffLine
share|improve this answer
    
thanks didnt word –  eyadgh Dec 27 '12 at 11:56
1  
@eyadgh: What error message did you receive? Is your system broken? What versions of awk and sed are you using? The other answers here should all work too. Also, what is your environment? –  Steve Dec 27 '12 at 12:04

Using sed:

sed 's/.*}ctr{\([^}]*\).*/\1/' input
share|improve this answer
    
Were you reading my screen? :D –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 27 '12 at 7:45
1  
Your mind, not your screen :) –  perreal Dec 27 '12 at 7:46
    
thanks didnt work –  eyadgh Dec 27 '12 at 11:58

One way of dealing with it is with sed:

sed -e 's/.*}ctr{//; s/}.*//' file.txt

This deletes everything up to and including the { after the word ctr (avoiding issues with any words which have ctr as a suffix, such as a hypothetical pxctr{Bogus} entry); it then deletes anything from the first remaining } onwards, leaving just StaffLine on the sample data.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks didnt work –  eyadgh Dec 27 '12 at 11:55
    
Curious: in what way did it not work for you? Given the sample data row copied from the question and the sample sed script copied from the answer, I got the output StaffLine which was what I understood was required. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 27 '12 at 15:06
perl -lne '$_=m/.*ctr{([^}]*)}.*/;print $1' your_file

tested below:

> cat temp
1|34|2012.12.01 00:08:35|12|4|921-*203-0000000000-962797807950|mar0101|0|00000106829DAE7F3FAB187550B920530C00|0|0|4000018001000002||962797807950|||||-1|||||-1||-1|0||||0||||||-1|-1|||-1|0|-1|-1|-1|2012.12.01 00:08:35|1|0||-1|1|||||||||||||0|0|||472|0|12|-2147483648|-2147483648|-2147483648|-2147483648|||||||||||||||||||||||||0|||0||1|6|252|tid{111211344662580792}pfid{10}gob{1}rid{globitel} afid{}uid1{962797807950}aid1{1}ar1{100}uid2{globitel}aid2{-1}pid{1234}pur{!GDRC RESERVE AMOUNT 10000}ratinf{}rec{0}rots{0}tda{}mid{}exd{0}reqa{100}ctr{StaffLine}ftksn{JMT}ftksr{0001}ftktp{PayCall Ticket}||
> perl -lne '$_=m/.*ctr{([^}]*)}.*/;print $1' temp
StaffLine
> 
share|improve this answer
    
thanks what is "per1 -lne" didnt work in unix –  eyadgh Dec 27 '12 at 11:55
1  
@eyadgh: Try perl instead of per1. You will need to install Perl first... –  Steve Dec 27 '12 at 12:07
    
i use unix ????? –  eyadgh Dec 27 '12 at 12:14
    
are you sure your are using perl and not per1.you have written numeric one instead of alphabet l in the word perl! –  Vijay Dec 27 '12 at 12:17
    
You could omit both .* patterns from your regex without affecting the result. You might use \bctr to ensure that ctr is a word on its own. But what you've got should work. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 27 '12 at 15:11

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