Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

My jsp page gets refreshed after each second. There are two images on page. One weighs 13 KB and other weighs 4 KB. Firefox doesn't load the images again and again but chrome keeps on loading the two images again and again. And it looks very bad ! Is there any way I can keep the browser from requesting the same image again and again ?

share|improve this question
2  
Why don't you use AJAX and refresh only the part of the page you need? – svz Dec 27 '12 at 8:02
    
@svz I can't. Is there any way with java – saplingPro Dec 27 '12 at 8:03
    
why is there no way to use AJAX? – Kevin Esche Dec 27 '12 at 8:06
1  
based on this side coderanch.com/t/443223/HTML-CSS-JavaScript/… it says: Don't be spending much of your time on this. I am pretty confident it is browser behavior in how it handles the iframe on refresh. I opened the code through FireFox, then I changed the URL in the file, saved, then refreshed the page. It proceeded to reload the original URL (prior to the refresh), then triggered the onLoad function loading the iframe with the new URL. So the whole thing is browser speficific. If you would like to have dynamic refreshes you should learn AJAX – Kevin Esche Dec 27 '12 at 8:20
1  
@saplingPro is your page served via HTTPS? Do you have a proper Cache-Control header when serving your images? – mtrbean Dec 27 '12 at 8:33
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should set an appropriate Expire header and Last-Modified header. From the maker of Chrome:

Recommendations

  • Set caching headers aggressively for all static resources. For all cacheable resources, we recommend the following settings: Set Expires to a minimum of one month, and preferably up to one year, in the future. (We prefer Expires over Cache-Control: max-age because it is is more widely supported.) Do not set it to more than one year in the future, as that violates the RFC guidelines. If you know exactly when a resource is going to change, setting a shorter expiration is okay. But if you think it "might change soon" but don't know when, you should set a long expiration and use URL fingerprinting (described below). Setting caching aggressively does not "pollute" browser caches: as far as we know, all browsers clear their caches according to a Least Recently Used algorithm; we are not aware of any browsers that wait until resources expire before purging them.

  • Set the Last-Modified date to the last time the resource was changed. If the Last-Modified date is sufficiently far enough in the past, chances are the browser won't refetch it.

If you are serving under HTTPS, you need to have properly signed certificate on your server otherwise Chrome wouldn't cache anything.

share|improve this answer

based on this side:

Don't be spending much of your time on this. I am pretty confident it is browser behavior in how it handles the iframe on refresh. I opened the code through FireFox, then I changed the URL in the file, saved, then refreshed the page. It proceeded to reload the original URL (prior to the refresh), then triggered the onLoad function loading the iframe with the new URL.

So the whole thing is browser specific. If you would like to have dynamic refreshes you should learn AJAX

share|improve this answer

A professional solution is to get the media-files from another server (ie facebook uses fbcdn instead of www) there you have always the full control over all caching mechanism in dedicated environment.

Another good solution is to use the etag-functionality ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP_ETag ), this must respect https-certificated as mtrbean's suggested.

The last-modified date is also a good solution, use this in combination with "Pragma: no-cache".

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.