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creating objects - new object or object literal notation?

What exactly is the difference between the following:

var myData = new Object();
myData["name"] = "ATOzTOA";
myData["site"] = "atoztoa";

and

var myData = {};
myData["name"] = "ATOzTOA";
myData["site"] = "atoztoa";

Update

What I got is this...

var myData = {
    "name" : "ATOzTOA",
    "site" : "atoztoa",
};

is a shortcut to

var myData = new Object({
    "name" : "ATOzTOA",
    "site" : "atoztoa",
});

Am I right?

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marked as duplicate by Holger Just, m90, SztupY, Kees C. Bakker, M42 Dec 27 '12 at 12:02

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no difference (technically). {} is just a shortcut for new Object().

However, if you assign an object literal, you may directly form a new object with multiple properties.

var myData = {
    name:   'ATOzTOA',
    size:   'atoztoa'
};

..which might feel more convenient. Also, it reduces the access on the object and is ultimately faster. But that is about microoptimizations. More important is that its a lot less to type.

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Nothing. {} just a short hand for new Object()

Its same logic as your full name is 'Mark Zuckerberg' and people call you ' Hi Mark'

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No difference in my view , Both are initializing the object. nothing else , it is a shortcut.

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