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Using global variables in a function other than the one that created them

I will not be posting any code here yet, although I can add them if you ask me to. I have a little problem with my little program and I knew what the problem was but I didn't know what was the solution. I know, I'm still a noob so please explain it simply.

I'm using functions so that my program won't be a mess but I don't know how to make a local variable into global.

Please help me.

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marked as duplicate by mgibsonbr, Bill the Lizard Dec 27 '12 at 14:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
If you use functions, but make their variables global, you haven't actually gained much ;-) –  delnan Dec 27 '12 at 8:57
4  
"I'm using functions so that my program won't be a mess", so just don't and refactor your code so that you wont need them. –  Rik Poggi Dec 27 '12 at 8:58
    
No, I will not make all their variables global, probably just a few. –  user1396297 Dec 27 '12 at 8:58
1  
So what? Still neither necessary nor good. Use return values and parameters. –  delnan Dec 27 '12 at 9:00
1  
Can you give us a short example of how you'd be using global values? (Edit your question) We might be able to suggest a better approach. –  Alex L Dec 27 '12 at 9:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here are two methods to achieve the same thing:

Using parameters and return (recommended)

def other_function(parameter):
    return parameter + 5

def main_function():
    x = 10
    print x    
    x = other_function(x)
    print x

When you run main_function, you'll get the following output

>>> 10
>>> 15

Using globals (never do this)

x = 0   # The initial value of x, with global scope

def other_function():
    global x
    x = x + 5

def main_function():
    print x    # Just printing - no need to declare global yet
    global x   # So we can change the global x
    x = 10
    print x
    other_function()
    print x

Now you will get:

>>> 0    # Initial global value
>>> 10   # Now we've set it to 10 in `main_function()`
>>> 15   # Now we've added 5 in `other_function()`
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Wait, how did the other_function() in your first example get a value of 10? You did not assign a value to its parameter, so it will not be able to know that the value was 5. –  user1396297 Dec 27 '12 at 9:21
1  
@HwangYouJin The original value is 10. You passing the variable x which has the value 10 to the other_function. It's like feeding into a machine. You give the machine a piece of bread (x in this case). You want to make toast. You give it a bread. Now the machine has the bread so it can use the bread. I think you should ask more questions to clear up confusions you have. –  CppLearner Dec 27 '12 at 9:24
1  
@HwangYouJin We set x to 10 with x = 10. We then ran other_function(x), which means that we're passing the value of x (10) into other_function. In other_function the parameter is called parameter, rather than x, but it still has the value 10. Inside other_function we return parameter + 5, which is 10 + 5 = 15! –  Alex L Dec 27 '12 at 9:27
    
@HwangYouJin Does this make more sense now? –  Alex L Dec 27 '12 at 10:18
    
Ah...Ok... I already noticed you gave x its value before calling other_function()... sorry. Anyway, how do you turn a value returned from a function into a variable, or to say it otherwise, how do you give a variable a value which is the value returned by a function? –  user1396297 Dec 27 '12 at 12:52

Simply declare your variable outside any function:

globalValue = 1

def f(x):
    print(globalValue + x)

If you need to assign to the global from within the function, use the global statement:

def f(x):
    global globalValue
    print(globalValue + x)
    globalValue += 1
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I have already used the global statement, but what I need is the current value of the global variable, which is in the function. –  user1396297 Dec 27 '12 at 9:06
3  
Your request doesn't seem to make sense. The current value of the global variable is in the global variable. Perhaps you could show your code to ease understanding. –  Greg Hewgill Dec 27 '12 at 9:08
    
No, the function supposedly should change the variable and return its value and update the global variable, but I can't seem to do that –  user1396297 Dec 27 '12 at 9:12

Using globals will also make your program a mess - I suggest you try very hard to avoid them. That said, "global" is a keyword in python, so you can designate a particular variable as a global, like so:

def foo():
    global bar
    bar = 32

I should mention that it is extremely rare for the 'global' keyword to be used, so I seriously suggest rethinking your design.

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I just used a global variable because many of my functions share it and I don't want to assign lines of code to update every variable in each of the functions. –  user1396297 Dec 27 '12 at 9:09

If you need access to the internal states of a function, you're possibly better off using a class. You can make a class instance behave like a function by making it a callable, which is done by defining __call__:

class StatefulFunction( object ):
    def __init__( self ):
        self.public_value = 'foo'

    def __call__( self ):
        return self.public_value


>> f = StatefulFunction()
>> f()
`foo`
>> f.public_value = 'bar'
>> f()
`bar`
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You could use module scope. Say you have a module called utils:

f_value = 'foo'

def f():
    return f_value

f_value is a module attribute that can be modified by any other module that imports it. As modules are singletons, any change to utils from one module will be accessible to all other modules that have it imported:

>> import utils
>> utils.f()
'foo'
>> utils.f_value = 'bar'
>> utils.f()
'bar'

Note that you can import the function by name:

>> import utils
>> from utils import f
>> utils.f_value = 'bar'
>> f()
'bar'

But not the attribute:

>> from utils import f, f_value
>> f_value = 'bar'
>> f()
'foo'

This is because you're labeling the object referenced by the module attribute as f_value in the local scope, but then rebinding it to the string bar, while the function f is still referring to the module attribute.

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