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I have two processes that may access the same file concurently and wanted to implement file locking. The trouble seems to be that one process is written in java and the other in C and it is not clear how low level locking is implemented on java side. The platform is Solaris 10. I tried to introduce locking on the file to prevent updates being done by Java process while C process is reading the file. My idea was to attempt to acquire a lock from the java code 10 times and only then to unconditionaly write to the file (I assumed the lock type was an advisory lock). However, the java tryLock() breaks C process' lock on the second attempt and corrupt the reading.

Here is the code, simplified (Java):

    int iAttemptCnt = 0;
              FileChannel wchannel = new FileOutputStream(new File(fileName), false).getChannel();;
              FileLock flock;
    while(true){
        try{
            MyLog.log(MyLog.LVL_INFO, "attempt to lock  file");
            if( (flock = wChannel.tryLock()) == null ){
                // lock held by another program
                if(++iAttemptCnt >= 10 
                    break;                  
            }
            else{
                MyLog.log(MyLog.LVL_INFO, " file locked");
                break;
            }
        }catch(OverlappingFileLockException ofle){
            .......                     
            if(++iAttemptCnt >= 10 ){
            ...
                break;          
            }                   
        }catch(IOException ioe){
            throw new IOException("failed to lock the  file");
        }
        try{
            MyLog.log(MyLog.LVL_INFO, "File already locked, retrying in one second");
            Thread.sleep(1000);
        }catch(InterruptedException ie){
            .....
        }

    }

C code uses fcntl:

fd = open(filename, O_RDONLY);

.....

lck.l_type = F_RDLCK;/* F_RDLCK setting a shared or read lock */ 

lck.l_whence = 0; /* offset l_start from beginning of file */ 

lck.l_start = 0LL; 

lck.l_len = 0LL; /* until the end of the file address space */ 

....

while(  fcntl(fd, F_SETLK64, &lck) < 0){ 

  if( errno == EAGAIN )

    ....    
  else if (errno == EIO )

     ...

  else if( errno == ENOLCK)

     ...

  else if (errno == EDEADLK)

     ...
  if(++ii == 10 ){     

    break;
  }

  ...    

  sleep(1);
} 

 MyLongLastingRead();

...
lck.l_type = F_UNLCK;

fcntl(fd, F_SETLK, &lck);

close(fd);

Does tryLock() really checks for lock?

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1 Answer 1

I am not sure if this will solve your problem or not but in the examples that I had seen flock structure's l_pid field was set as below.

fl.l_pid = getpid();

In your question you are not setting this field. Try and see if it makes any difference. I hope it helps.

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Unfortunately it did not help. Anyway, thanks for the answer. –  homerski Jan 3 '13 at 14:44

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