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What would be a good pattern to use here?

I don´t want to return nulls, that just does not feel right.

Another thing is, what if I want to return the reason that causes it to null? If caller knows why it is null, it can do some extra things so I want caller knows it and acts that way

Public CustomerDetails getCustomerDetails(){
   if(noCustomer){    
     ..log..etc..
     return null;
   }

   if(some other bad weird condition){    
     ..log..etc..
     return null;
   }

   CustomerDetails details= getCustomerDetailsFromSomewhere();

   if (details!=null){
      return details;
   }
   else {
     ..log..etc..
     return null;
   }

}
share|improve this question
    
why do you think returning null is bad ?? any specific reason ? – PermGenError Dec 27 '12 at 10:04
1  
One possibility is, you can throw an IllegalArgumentException. Or create your own CustomException, and use it. But, trust me, that will take more of your time than returning null. Now why you don't want to return null? – Rohit Jain Dec 27 '12 at 10:05
    
@GanGnaMStYleOverFlowErroR I will do a null check everytime I have to call it so prone to errors, but main reason is it just "feels" wrong in this case. I might be wrong – Spring Dec 27 '12 at 10:06
    
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you mean that the null does not explain its state, you can wrapper CustomerDetails with another class that can give more details. For example:

class Feedback()
{
    private CustomerDetails result;
    private int status;

    public static final int STATUS_OK = 0;
    public static final int STATUS_NULL = 1;
    public static final int STATUS_NO_CUSTOMER = 2;
    public static final int STATUS_BAD_CONDITION = 3;

    public Feedback(CustomerDetails result, int status)
    {
        this.result = result;
        this.status= status;
    }

    public CustomerDetails getResult(){return result;}
    public int getStatus(){return status;}
}

and change your method with:

Public Feedback getCustomerDetails()
{
   if(noCustomer)
   {
       ..log..etc..
       return new Feedback(null, Feeback.STATUS_NO_CUSTOMER);
   }

   if(some other bad weird condition)
   {
       ..log..etc..
       return new Feedback(null, Feeback.STATUS_BAD_CONDITION);
   }

   CustomerDetails details = getCustomerDetailsFromSomewhere();

   if(details != null)
   {
        return new Feedback(details, Feeback.STATUS_OK);
   }
   else
   {
       ..log..etc..
       return new Feedback(null, Feeback.STATUS_NULL);
   }
}

Then you can get the status by feedback.getStatus().

share|improve this answer
    
tnx I updated the question – Spring Dec 27 '12 at 10:17
    
I think there is a small mistake, you return details instaed of a Feedback object after null check – Spring Dec 27 '12 at 10:20
    
@Spring You are right. I updated my answer accordingly. – Eng.Fouad Dec 27 '12 at 10:22
    
and could you compare this approach by just throwing a custom exception? that somehow looks simpler to me – Spring Dec 27 '12 at 10:26
1  
@Spring In case you throw different exceptions instead of throwing the same exception everytime, then the caller can know the exact reason by having multiple catch statements. – Eng.Fouad Dec 27 '12 at 10:39

I think you have 3 main options:

  • If null is a valid state I see no problem in returning null
  • If null is an invalid state you should throw an exception
  • Or make use of the Null object pattern

If you are using googles Guava libraries you can also use the Optional class.

share|improve this answer

The more natural way in Java is to throw an exception on an error condition.

public CustomerDetails getCustomerDetails(){
   if(noCustomer){    
     ..log..etc..
     throw new NoSuchCustomer(customerName);
   }

   if(some other bad weird condition){    
     ..log..etc..
     throw new IllegalStateException("some other bad weird condition occurred");
   }

   CustomerDetails details= getCustomerDetailsFromSomewhere();

   if (details==null)
      throw new IllegalStateException("Failed to get customer details for "+ customerName);

   return details;
}

The method getCustomerDetailsFromSomewhere() could throw an exception instead of returning null.

share|improve this answer
    
tnx, could you tell what is the pros and cons of this approach instead of using null object design pattern or use a Feedback wrapper class – Spring Dec 27 '12 at 10:24
1  
@Spring: exceptions are used to signal exceptional, non expected situations. If having no customer is a normal situation, returning null or an Optional is fine. On the contrary, if having no customer, or having this "bad weird" condition, is not expected, then an exception could be thrown. If you wrote the contract of the method, and describe what "noCustomer" and "bad weird condition" actually are, we could give you a better advice. – JB Nizet Dec 27 '12 at 10:37
1  
@JB Nizet those are user is loggedin in and is user auhorized checks, and I need to return a proper http code to the caller class cause it will be used by Jersey rest service and there are many other similar of these methods and I want to decouple this service methods from all rest related classes, – Spring Dec 27 '12 at 11:47
    
@JB Nizet in this case writing a wrapper feedback class(as Eng.Fouad sugegsted) which handles these situations by returning an appropriate web exception I think is the way to go – Spring Dec 27 '12 at 11:49
    
@JB Nizet are you agree? – Spring Dec 27 '12 at 12:36

Try Guava's Optional. See this article on avoiding null: http://code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/wiki/UsingAndAvoidingNullExplained

share|improve this answer

Use Google Guava Optional.

This will help.

Many of the cases where programmers use null is to indicate some sort of absence: perhaps where there might have been a value, there is none, or one could not be found. For example, Map.get returns null when no value is found for a key.

Optional is a way of replacing a nullable T reference with a non-null value. An Optional may either contain a non-null T reference (in which case we say the reference is "present"), or it may contain nothing (in which case we say the reference is "absent"). It is never said to "contain null."

Optional<Integer> possible = Optional.of(5);
possible.isPresent(); // returns true
possible.get(); // returns 5
share|improve this answer

You could try;

CustomerDetails details = setDetailsToEmpty();

or some equivalent.

You still have to check, either for null or empty customer details.

share|improve this answer

If you really don't want null create a special CustomerDetails object

...
        public static final CustomerDetails EMPTY_CUSTOMER_DETAILS = new CustomerDetails();
...    
        public CustomerDetails getCustomerDetails(){
            ...
            if (details!=null){
                return details;
            }
            ...
            return EMPTY_CUSTOMER_DETAILS;
share|improve this answer

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