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I'm actually using this code to print an HTML file in my JSP from a "not available" folder on my server (I mean that if I'm writing the correct URL of my files, I can't view them on my browser):

InputStreamReader isr = new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(request.getParameter("path")));
BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(isr);    
String line = br.readLine();
while(line!=null){
    out.println(line);
    line = br.readLine();
}

In "path" there is my file's URL. This actually works, but it shows my HTML file in the same page where I launch this piece of code. I actually need to do this on a new page, like when you set this HTML A tag in this way:

<a href="www.mywebsite.com" TARGET="_new">LINK</a>
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1  
Why are you reading and writing ? Why don't you forward it using Request dispatcher ... like this ... .RequestDispatcher rd = getServletContext().getRequestDispatcher(destination); rd.forward(request, response); –  AurA Dec 27 '12 at 10:59
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1 Answer

up vote -1 down vote accepted

I solved it like this:

<a href="www.mywebsite.com/print?id=1&file=myfile.html" TARGET="_new">View</a>

and in servlet print I put this code into the processRequest(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) who is called by doGet/doPost:

String path1 = "mydir1/";
String path2 = "mydir2/";
String file = request.getParameter("file");    
InputStreamReader isr;
BufferedReader br;
String line = "";
char id = request.getParameter("id").charAt(0);
if(id == '1') {
    isr = new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(mydir1 + file));
    br = new BufferedReader(isr);
    line = br.readLine();
    while(line!=null){
        out.println(line);
        line = br.readLine();
    }
}
else if(id == '2') {
    isr = new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(mydir2 + file));
    br = new BufferedReader(isr);
    line = br.readLine();
    while(line!=null){
        out.println(line);
        line = br.readLine();
    }
}
else {
    out.println("Error");
}

With this there are no more security issues, because the enduser/hacker can't view the entire path, or passing it throug get method.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 for the major security hole. This approach allows the enduser/hacker to get every single file from the disk file system to display on a web page by just editing the request parameter value to e.g. /Users/Administrator/passwords.txt, including those which are not intented to be publicly accessible such as web.xml, user documents, operating system files, etc. –  BalusC Dec 27 '12 at 18:55
    
Edited with a new solution. –  abierto Dec 28 '12 at 11:21
    
It can still pass ../../../../some.ext. Just don't use FileInputStream at all. Put it on classpath or webcontent and get it from there. Or, depending on the functional requirement, which is not clear from the question at all, you could also go for the forward() call. –  BalusC Dec 28 '12 at 11:24
    
As you understood, my files aren't and can't be on the classpath/webcontent folder, they are outside the webapp folder. I've already tried to use the forward() function, but of course it didn't work. How the enduser can see other path if they are on the servlet? The cliend can't see their path, just the file name (which is already shown on a list). This webapp is for internal use anyway. –  abierto Dec 28 '12 at 12:59
1  
Map servlet on /print/* and open it by /print/myfile.html?id=1 instead. You can get the file part by request.getPathInfo(). This way any ../ navigation would affect only the request URL (and end up in 404), not the file path. –  BalusC Dec 28 '12 at 13:00
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