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As title stated, what's the runtime of equals() in java.util.Arrays ?

For example if it's comparing two int[] , does it loop through every element in the array, so O(n)? And for all equals() in individual classes' equals() in java, can we assume that the runtime is always O(n) ?

Thanks.

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5  
why dont you check the source ?? –  PermGenError Dec 27 '12 at 10:42
1  
In the general case, it is unspecified (because a class could have its own equals). However, it is a deep compare, so probably is O(n) for comparing two int[] –  Basile Starynkevitch Dec 27 '12 at 10:44
    
what do you mean by default equals? –  vishal_aim Dec 27 '12 at 10:48
    
@vishal_aim the default equals is defined "Two arrays are considered equal if both arrays contain the same number of elements, and all corresponding pairs of elements in the two arrays are equal. In other words, two arrays are equal if they contain the same elements in the same order. Also, two array references are considered equal if both are null." –  cinnamon toast Dec 27 '12 at 10:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

As title stated, what's the runtime of default equals() in java.util.Arrays?

The default equals could mean Object.equals. The Arrays.equals() is usually what you really want.

For example if it's comparing two int[], does it loop through every element in the array, so O(n)?

yes, thats what the source suggests.

And for all default equals() in java, can we assume that the runtime is always O(n)?

For some collections this is true, but for Tree collections it can be O(n log n). The worst case for HashMap is O(N^2) For non-collections n has no meaning.

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Is this defined in the JVM spec, as being how to implement Array.equals(), or is the implementation left up to the particular JVM writers. i.e. will this also be true of IBMs JVM, and the Dalvik VM, or could this change in a future Oracle JVM? –  Samuel Walker Dec 27 '12 at 11:34
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@SamuelWalker While I doubt it is part of the spec, the behaviour of long standing methods don't change much on the basis that you never know what it might break if it did. In this case, it is hard to imagine why you would implement it another way esp. given you have a reference implementation. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 27 '12 at 11:39
    
How can it be O(n log n) for a Tree? Isn't it O(n*n log n)? –  soandos Dec 27 '12 at 12:37
    
@soandos A Tree needs to make N lookups which are O(log N) each, so O(N log N) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 27 '12 at 12:42
    
@wvxvw For hash-maps, you'll get the worst-case O(n^2) behavior if you're very unlucky (or have an evil user) and all of your objects' hash values are the same. In that case, you end up having no real choice but to do an n x n comparison. hash-map equals will typically have an average runtime of O(n), but the worst-case for the obvious equality-checking implementation is O(n^2). –  Edward Loper Dec 27 '12 at 14:34

Grabbed from the source code (source code is worth 100 words :P):

/**
 * Returns <tt>true</tt> if the two specified arrays of ints are
 * <i>equal</i> to one another.  Two arrays are considered equal if both
 * arrays contain the same number of elements, and all corresponding pairs
 * of elements in the two arrays are equal.  In other words, two arrays
 * are equal if they contain the same elements in the same order.  Also,
 * two array references are considered equal if both are <tt>null</tt>.<p>
 *
 * @param a one array to be tested for equality
 * @param a2 the other array to be tested for equality
 * @return <tt>true</tt> if the two arrays are equal
 */
public static boolean equals(int[] a, int[] a2) {
    if (a==a2)
        return true;
    if (a==null || a2==null)
        return false;

    int length = a.length;
    if (a2.length != length)
        return false;

    for (int i=0; i<length; i++)
        if (a[i] != a2[i])
            return false;

    return true;
}
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This isn't the default equals. –  Henry Dec 27 '12 at 10:45
    
Sorry I meant the equals in java.util.Array, not the default equals in Object –  cinnamon toast Dec 27 '12 at 11:17

It first checks the length, and if equal, loops over all elements and calls equals on them.

So, if you want to ignore the cost of the individual equals, yes, that would be O(n). But if the entries are Strings, for example, it will also get longer as the Strings get longer, not just as they get more (because the comparisons themselves are O(m) as well).

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The javadoc states: two arrays are equal if they contain the same elements in the same order. So it is clear that this is going to be an O(n) operation as it will need to loop over all the items (at least if they are all equal).

The default equals (i.e. Object#equals) is an O(1) operation, it is a simple reference comparison:

for any non-null reference values x and y, this method returns true if and only if x and y refer to the same object (x == y has the value true)

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