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I have the following problem: I developped a tool that extracts styles from the HTML tags and put them into the header (i.e. it makes inline CSS internal). It seems however that line-height renders differently when having more than one CSS class:

This is the sample before tool-extraction: calling 1 internal CSS class + specifying 1 inline CSS style

<html>
<head>
<style>
<!--
 p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
    {margin-top:0cm;
    margin-right:0cm;
    margin-bottom:10.0pt;
    margin-left:0cm;
    line-height:115%;
    font-size:11.0pt;
    font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";}
-->
</style>
</head>
<body>
<p class=MsoNormal style='text-align:justify;line-height:normal'>
<span style='font-size:20.0pt'>
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, 
sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore 
magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud 
exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo 
consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate 
velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur 
sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia 
deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</span></p>
</body>
</html>

And this is the sample after tool-extraction: calling 2 internal CSS classes -> line-height renders differently!

<html>
<head>
<style>
<!--
 p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
    {margin-top:0cm;
    margin-right:0cm;
    margin-bottom:10.0pt;
    margin-left:0cm;
    line-height:115%;
    font-size:11.0pt;
    font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";}
.inlineClass009
    {text-align:justify;line-height:normal}
-->
</style>
</head>
<body>
<p class="MsoNormal inlineClass009">
<span style='font-size:20.0pt'>
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, 
sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore 
magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud 
exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo 
consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate 
velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur 
sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia 
deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.</span></p>
</body>
</html>

share|improve this question
    
What is an "internal CSS class"? –  BoltClock Dec 27 '12 at 10:49
    
an internal CSS is defined in the header, while an inline CSS is defined in a "style" tag attribute and an external CSS (out of the scope of this example) is defined in a standalone file with .css extension. see w3schools.com/css/css_howto.asp –  user1931838 Dec 27 '12 at 13:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In both samples, there are two declarations for line-height on the element. In the first sample, the declaration line-height:normal in the style attribute wins, by the specificity rules. In the second sample, the declaration line-height:115% wins, because the selector p.MsoNormal is more specific than the selector .inlineClass009, by the specificity rules.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, this is clearly a lead. then how could I prioritize my second class .inlineClass009 (created with the extractor) over the p.MsoNormal selector? –  user1931838 Dec 27 '12 at 13:02
    
Given the current order, p.inlineClass009 would suffice; then the specificity would be equal, so the order would matter. It would be safer to use higher specificity, e.g. p.MsoNormal.inlineClass009 (double class selector, i.e. the element must be in both classes). –  Jukka K. Korpela Dec 27 '12 at 13:49
    
I found another way that works quite well: add the !important rule to the elements of the inline style that I make internal. I found it in the same page that you linked: w3.org/TR/CSS21/cascade.html#important-rules Which solution would you recommend, double class selector or !important rule? –  user1931838 Dec 27 '12 at 14:01
1  
A more specific selector is a better way. The !important specifier should be used as last resort if at all. Besides, it would not help if the other rule has !important, too. –  Jukka K. Korpela Dec 27 '12 at 14:05
    
Again thanks, it works good and solved my problem –  user1931838 Dec 27 '12 at 14:42

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