Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have to deal with (a variation of) the following scenario. My model classes are:

class Car {
    String brand;
    Engine engine;
}

abstract class Engine {
}

class V12Engine extends Engine {
    int horsePowers;
}

class V6Engine extends Engine {
    String fuelType;
}

And I have to deserialize (no need for serialization support ATM) the following input:

<list>

    <brand id="1">
        Volvo
    </brand>

    <car>
        <brand>BMW</brand>
        <v12engine horsePowers="300" />
    </car>

    <car>
        <brand refId="1" />
        <v6engine fuel="unleaded" />
    </car>

</list>

What I've tried / issues:

I've tried using XStream, but it expects me to write tags such as:

<engine class="cars.V12Engine">
    <horsePowers>300</horsePowers>
</engine>

etc. (I don't want an <engine>-tag, I want a <v6engine>-tag or a <v12engine>-tag.

Also, I need to be able to refer back to "predefined" brands based on identifiers, as shown with the brand-id above. (For instance by maintaining a Map<Integer, String> predefinedBrands during the deserialization). I don't know if XStream is well suited for such scenario.

I realize that this could be done "manually" with a push or pull parser (such as SAX or StAX) or a DOM-library. I would however prefer to have some more automation. Ideally, I should be able to add classes (such as new Engines) and start using them in the XML right away. (XStream is by no means a requirement, the most elegant solutions wins the bounty.)

share|improve this question
1  
Just to make this clear. Do you want deserialization from XML into a java object AND, in reverse, serialization of a object into XML? –  Michel Feldheim Dec 29 '12 at 11:33
    
Ah sorry, no, I'm only interested in deserialization (parsing) ATM. (Question clarified.) –  aioobe Dec 29 '12 at 12:34
    
Have you looked at XMI? Not sure that the element name can be used to select the property sub-type of an element - usually this is done with the "xsi:type"... –  Tonny Madsen Dec 29 '12 at 13:38
    
Nope, haven't looked into XMI. I'll take a look. –  aioobe Dec 29 '12 at 13:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted
+500

JAXB (javax.xml.bind) can do everything you're after, though some bits are easier than others. For the sake of simplicity I'm going to assume that all your XML files have a namespace - it's trickier if they don't but can be worked around using the StAX APIs.

<list xmlns="http://example.com/cars">

    <brand id="1">
        Volvo
    </brand>

    <car>
        <brand>BMW</brand>
        <v12engine horsePowers="300" />
    </car>

    <car>
        <brand refId="1" />
        <v6engine fuel="unleaded" />
    </car>

</list>

and assume a corresponding package-info.java of

@XmlSchema(namespace = "http://example.com/cars",
           elementFormDefault = XmlNsForm.QUALIFIED)
package cars;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;

Engine type by element name

This is simple, using @XmlElementRef:

package cars;
import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;

@XmlRootElement
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
public class Car {
    String brand;
    @XmlElementRef
    Engine engine;
}

@XmlRootElement
abstract class Engine {
}

@XmlRootElement(name = "v12engine")
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
class V12Engine extends Engine {
    @XmlAttribute
    int horsePowers;
}

@XmlRootElement(name = "v6engine")
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
class V6Engine extends Engine {
    // override the default attribute name, which would be fuelType
    @XmlAttribute(name = "fuel")
    String fuelType;
}

The various types of Engine are all annotated @XmlRootElement and marked with appropriate element names. At unmarshalling time the element name found in the XML is used to decide which of the Engine subclasses to use. So given XML of

<car xmlns="http://example.com/cars">
    <brand>BMW</brand>
    <v12engine horsePowers="300" />
</car>

and unmarshalling code

JAXBContext ctx = JAXBContext.newInstance(Car.class, V6Engine.class, V12Engine.class);
Unmarshaller um = ctx.createUnmarshaller();
Car c = (Car)um.unmarshal(new File("file.xml"));

assert "BMW".equals(c.brand);
assert c.engine instanceof V12Engine;
assert ((V12Engine)c.engine).horsePowers == 300;

To add a new type of Engine simply create the new subclass, annotate it with @XmlRootElement as appropriate, and add this new class to the list passed to JAXBContext.newInstance().

Cross-references for brands

JAXB has a cross-referencing mechanism based on @XmlID and @XmlIDREF but these require that the ID attribute be a valid XML ID, i.e. an XML name, and in particular not entirely consisting of digits. But it's not too difficult to keep track of the cross references yourself, as long as you don't require "forward" references (i.e. a <car> that refers to a <brand> that has not yet been "declared").

The first step is to define a JAXB class to represent the <brand>

package cars;

import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;

@XmlRootElement
public class Brand {
  @XmlValue // i.e. the simple content of the <brand> element
  String name;

  // optional id and refId attributes (optional because they're
  // Integer rather than int)
  @XmlAttribute
  Integer id;

  @XmlAttribute
  Integer refId;
}

Now we need a "type adapter" to convert between the Brand object and the String required by Car, and to maintain the id/ref mapping

package cars;

import javax.xml.bind.annotation.adapters.*;
import java.util.*;

public class BrandAdapter extends XmlAdapter<Brand, String> {
  private Map<Integer, Brand> brandCache = new HashMap<Integer, Brand>();

  public Brand marshal(String s) {
    return null;
  }


  public String unmarshal(Brand b) {
    if(b.id != null) {
      // this is a <brand id="..."> - cache it
      brandCache.put(b.id, b);
    }
    if(b.refId != null) {
      // this is a <brand refId="..."> - pull it from the cache
      b = brandCache.get(b.refId);
    }

    // and extract the name
    return (b.name == null) ? null : b.name.trim();
  }
}

We link the adapter to the brand field of Car using another annotation:

@XmlRootElement
@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
public class Car {
    @XmlJavaTypeAdapter(BrandAdapter.class)
    String brand;
    @XmlElementRef
    Engine engine;
}

The final part of the puzzle is to ensure that <brand> elements found at the top level get saved in the cache. Here is a complete example

package cars;

import javax.xml.bind.*;
import java.io.File;
import java.util.*;

import javax.xml.stream.*;
import javax.xml.transform.stream.StreamSource;

public class Main {
  public static void main(String[] argv) throws Exception {
    List<Car> cars = new ArayList<Car>();

    JAXBContext ctx = JAXBContext.newInstance(Car.class, V12Engine.class, V6Engine.class, Brand.class);
    Unmarshaller um = ctx.createUnmarshaller();

    // create an adapter, and register it with the unmarshaller
    BrandAdapter ba = new BrandAdapter();
    um.setAdapter(BrandAdapter.class, ba);

    // create a StAX XMLStreamReader to read the XML file
    XMLInputFactory xif = XMLInputFactory.newFactory();
    XMLStreamReader xsr = xif.createXMLStreamReader(new StreamSource(new File("file.xml")));

    xsr.nextTag(); // root <list> element
    xsr.nextTag(); // first <brand> or <car> child

    // read each <brand>/<car> in turn
    while(xsr.getEventType() == XMLStreamConstants.START_ELEMENT) {
      Object obj = um.unmarshal(xsr);

      // unmarshal from an XMLStreamReader leaves the reader pointing at
      // the event *after* the closing tag of the element we read.  If there
      // was a text node between the closing tag of this element and the opening
      // tag of the next then we will need to skip it.
      if(xsr.getEventType() != XMLStreamConstants.START_ELEMENT && xsr.getEventType() != XMLStreamConstants.END_ELEMENT) xsr.nextTag();

      if(obj instanceof Brand) {
        // top-level <brand> - hand it to the BrandAdapter so it can be
        // cached if necessary
        ba.unmarshal((Brand)obj);
      }
      if(obj instanceof Car) {
        cars.add((Car)obj);
      }
    }
    xsr.close();

    // at this point, cars contains all the Car objects we found, with
    // any <brand> refIds resolved.
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Looks amazing. I'm going to try this out tomorrow! –  aioobe Dec 29 '12 at 18:44
    
Thanks :) I just finished setting up a java environment at home. I was going to try a solution in with jaxb, now I will try XStream instead :) –  Michel Feldheim Dec 29 '12 at 19:14

Here's a solution with XStream, since you seem to already be familiar with it and since it's an incredibly flexible XML tool. It's done in Groovy because it's just so much nicer than Java. Porting to Java would be fairly trivial. Note that I opted to do a little post-processing of the result instead of trying to make XStream do all the work for me. Specifically, the "brand references" are handled after the fact. I could do it inside the marshalling, but I think this approach is cleaner and leaves your options more open for future modification. In addition, this approach allows "brand" elements to occur anywhere throughout the document, including after cars that refer to them--something I don't think you could accomplish if you were doing replacements on the fly.

Solution with annotations

import com.thoughtworks.xstream.XStream
import com.thoughtworks.xstream.annotations.*
import com.thoughtworks.xstream.converters.*
import com.thoughtworks.xstream.converters.extended.ToAttributedValueConverter
import com.thoughtworks.xstream.io.*
import com.thoughtworks.xstream.mapper.Mapper

// The classes as given, plus toString()'s for readable output and XStream
// annotations to support unmarshalling. Note that with XStream's flexibility,
// all of this is possible with no annotations, so no code modifications are
// actually required.

@XStreamAlias("car")
// A custom converter for handling the oddities of parsing a Car, defined
// below.
@XStreamConverter(CarConverter)
class Car {
    String brand
    Engine engine
    String toString() { "Car{brand='$brand', engine=$engine}" }
}

abstract class Engine {
}

@XStreamAlias("v12engine")
class V12Engine extends Engine {
    @XStreamAsAttribute int horsePowers
    String toString() { "V12Engine{horsePowers=$horsePowers}" }
}

@XStreamAlias("v6engine")
class V6Engine extends Engine {
    @XStreamAsAttribute @XStreamAlias("fuel") String fuelType
    String toString() { "V6Engine{fuelType='$fuelType'}" }
}

// The given input:
String xml = """\
    <list>
        <brand id="1">
            Volvo
        </brand>
        <car>
            <brand>BMW</brand>
            <v12engine horsePowers="300" />
        </car>
        <car>
            <brand refId="1" />
            <v6engine fuel="unleaded" />
        </car>
    </list>"""

// The solution:

// A temporary Brand class to hold the relevant information needed for parsing
@XStreamAlias("brand")
// An out-of-the-box converter that uses a single field as the value of an
// element and makes everything else attributes: a perfect match for the given
// "brand" XML.
@XStreamConverter(value=ToAttributedValueConverter, strings="name")
class Brand {
    Integer id
    Integer refId
    String name
    String toString() { "Brand{id=$id, refId=$refId, name='$name'}" }
}

// Reads Car instances, figuring out the engine type and storing appropriate
// brand info along the way.
class CarConverter implements Converter {
    Mapper mapper

    // A Mapper can be injected auto-magically by XStream when converters are
    // configured via annotation.
    CarConverter(Mapper mapper) {
        this.mapper = mapper
    }

    Object unmarshal(HierarchicalStreamReader reader,
                     UnmarshallingContext context) {
        Car car = new Car()
        reader.moveDown()
        Brand brand = context.convertAnother(car, Brand)
        reader.moveUp()
        reader.moveDown()
        // The mapper knows about registered aliases and can tell us which
        // engine type it is.
        Class engineClass = mapper.realClass(reader.getNodeName())
        def engine = context.convertAnother(car, engineClass)
        reader.moveUp()
        // Set the brand name if available or a placeholder for later 
        // reference if not.
        if (brand.name) {
            car.brand = brand.name
        } else {
            car.brand = "#{$brand.refId}"
        }
        car.engine = engine
        return car
    }

    boolean canConvert(Class type) { type == Car }

    void marshal(Object source, HierarchicalStreamWriter writer,
                 MarshallingContext context) {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Don't need this right now")
    }
}

// Now exercise it:

def x = new XStream()
// As written, this line would have to be modified to add new engine types,
// but if this isn't desirable, classpath scanning or some other kind of
// auto-registration could be set up, but not through XStream that I know of.
x.processAnnotations([Car, Brand, V12Engine, V6Engine] as Class[])
// Parsing will create a List containing Brands and Cars
def brandsAndCars = x.fromXML(xml)
List<Brand> brands = brandsAndCars.findAll { it instanceof Brand }
// XStream doesn't trim whitespace as occurs in the sample XML. Maybe it can
// be made to?
brands.each { it.name = it.name.trim() }
Map<Integer, Brand> brandsById = brands.collectEntries{ [it.id, it] }
List<Car> cars = brandsAndCars.findAll{ it instanceof Car }
// Regex match brand references and replace them with brand names.
cars.each {
    def brandReference = it.brand =~ /#\{(.*)\}/
    if (brandReference) {
        int brandId = brandReference[0][1].toInteger()
        it.brand = brandsById.get(brandId).name
    }
}
println "Brands:"
brands.each{ println "  $it" }
println "Cars:"
cars.each{ println "  $it" }

Output

Brands:
  Brand{id=1, refId=null, name='Volvo'}
Cars:
  Car{brand='BMW', engine=V12Engine{horsePowers=300}}
  Car{brand='Volvo', engine=V6Engine{fuelType='unleaded'}}

Solution without annotations

P.S. Just for grins, here's the same thing with no annotations. It's all the same except that instead of annotating the classes, there are several additional lines under the new XStream() that do everything the annotations were doing before. The output is identical.

import com.thoughtworks.xstream.XStream
import com.thoughtworks.xstream.converters.*
import com.thoughtworks.xstream.converters.extended.ToAttributedValueConverter
import com.thoughtworks.xstream.io.*
import com.thoughtworks.xstream.mapper.Mapper

class Car {
    String brand
    Engine engine
    String toString() { "Car{brand='$brand', engine=$engine}" }
}

abstract class Engine {
}

class V12Engine extends Engine {
    int horsePowers
    String toString() { "V12Engine{horsePowers=$horsePowers}" }
}

class V6Engine extends Engine {
    String fuelType
    String toString() { "V6Engine{fuelType='$fuelType'}" }
}

String xml = """\
    <list>
        <brand id="1">
            Volvo
        </brand>
        <car>
            <brand>BMW</brand>
            <v12engine horsePowers="300" />
        </car>
        <car>
            <brand refId="1" />
            <v6engine fuel="unleaded" />
        </car>
    </list>"""

class Brand {
    Integer id
    Integer refId
    String name
    String toString() { "Brand{id=$id, refId=$refId, name='$name'}" }
}

class CarConverter implements Converter {
    Mapper mapper

    CarConverter(Mapper mapper) {
        this.mapper = mapper
    }

    Object unmarshal(HierarchicalStreamReader reader,
                     UnmarshallingContext context) {
        Car car = new Car()
        reader.moveDown()
        Brand brand = context.convertAnother(car, Brand)
        reader.moveUp()
        reader.moveDown()
        Class engineClass = mapper.realClass(reader.getNodeName())
        def engine = context.convertAnother(car, engineClass)
        reader.moveUp()
        if (brand.name) {
            car.brand = brand.name
        } else {
            car.brand = "#{$brand.refId}"
        }
        car.engine = engine
        return car
    }

    boolean canConvert(Class type) { type == Car }

    void marshal(Object source, HierarchicalStreamWriter writer,
                 MarshallingContext context) {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Don't need this right now")
    }
}

def x = new XStream()
x.alias('car', Car)
x.alias('brand', Brand)
x.alias('v6engine', V6Engine)
x.alias('v12engine', V12Engine)
x.registerConverter(new CarConverter(x.mapper))
x.registerConverter(new ToAttributedValueConverter(Brand, x.mapper, x.reflectionProvider, x.converterLookup, 'name'))
x.useAttributeFor(V12Engine, 'horsePowers')
x.aliasAttribute(V6Engine, 'fuelType', 'fuel')
x.useAttributeFor(V6Engine, 'fuelType')
def brandsAndCars = x.fromXML(xml)
List<Brand> brands = brandsAndCars.findAll { it instanceof Brand }
brands.each { it.name = it.name.trim() }
Map<Integer, Brand> brandsById = brands.collectEntries{ [it.id, it] }
List<Car> cars = brandsAndCars.findAll{ it instanceof Car }
cars.each {
    def brandReference = it.brand =~ /#\{(.*)\}/
    if (brandReference) {
        int brandId = brandReference[0][1].toInteger()
        it.brand = brandsById.get(brandId).name
    }
}
println "Brands:"
brands.each{ println "  $it" }
println "Cars:"
cars.each{ println "  $it" }

P.P.S. If you have Gradle installed, you can drop this into a build.gradle and one of the above scripts into src/main/groovy/XStreamExample.groovy, and then just gradle run it to see the result:

apply plugin: 'groovy'
apply plugin: 'application'

mainClassName = 'XStreamExample'

dependencies {
    groovy 'org.codehaus.groovy:groovy:2.0.5'
    compile 'com.thoughtworks.xstream:xstream:1.4.3'
}

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1? Really? Did I miss something blatantly obvious? –  Ryan Stewart Dec 30 '12 at 5:03
    
+1 from me anyway! I'll give it a try, thanks! –  aioobe Dec 30 '12 at 11:37

You can try referencing here to get some ideas.

Personally, I would use a DOM Parser to get the contents of the XML file.

Example:

import java.io.*;
import javax.xml.parsers.*;

import org.w3c.dom.*;

public class DOMExample {

  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

    DocumentBuilder builder = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance().newDocumentBuilder();

    File file = new File("filename.xml");
    Document doc = builder.parse(file);

    NodeList carList = doc.getElementsByTagName("car");
    for (int i = 0; i < carList.getLength(); ++i) {

        Element carElem = (Element)carList.item(i);

        Element brandElem = (Element)carElem.getElementsByTagName("brand").item(0);
        Element engineElem = (Element)carElem.getElementsByTagName("v12engine").item(0);

        String brand= brandElem.getTextContent();
        String engine= engineElem.getTextContent();

        System.out.println(brand+ ", " + engine);

        // TODO Do something with the desired information.
    }       
  }
}

If you know the possible contents of the tag names, this would work pretty well. There are many ways to parse through an XML file. Hopefully you can come up with something that works for you. Good luck!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.